Volume 14, Issue 175, May 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 175, May 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

It’s getting really nippy up here on the Highveld! How I dread winter…

The News section this month is, like just about every month, dominated by bad news for wolves in the US. Well, what can you expect? It is important though to stay up-to-date and sign every petition or protest there is, though, if we want to help these marvellous creatures survive.

An interesting report about the wolves in Yellowstone came our way. It is all the more interesting considering the perils these flagship wolves face at the borders of this park.

We also have a wolf tale, one of how things should be, which might make you forget for a short moment how it really is.

Till the next newsletter,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration here

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone at 

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (committee@huskyromi.co.za)

Sanctuary Update

The month of April has been a terrible month. It is with sad hearts we had to say goodbye to Chekhov and Wolfie. We had to send Chekhov to the Sanctuary in Thesky because of old age and poor Wolfie was being brave as always and decided to take on a Rinkhals, unfortunately the Rinkhals got the better of Wolfie. Chekhov and Wolfie will roam free in our memories always.

The rains have been difficult to contend with, in one day we had 91 mm of rain causing a lot of damage, but we won’t harp on all the bad. On a happy note our rondavel is now at the stage where we start working on the roof, the trusses go up and stay up now, beginning of May we start with the brandering, and then it’s the tiles with the insulation underneath.

This has been a very long and slow process, with only one builder on site but I wouldn’t do it another way, everyone who knows anything about building has told me what a wonderful job Robert is doing, Thank you Robert for all the hard work. We look forward to seeing some of you out here in the near future, we should throw a roof wetting party, when we have a roof to wet.

To keep the wolves and huskies safe and homed we are continuously busy with maintenance projects at the sanctuary and in order to keep it a sanctuary for the beautiful wolves and huskies we have noticed that the easiest way to get involved and help is to donate the much used and needed supplies for these projects.

Should you know of anyone who can assist or you yourself can support by supplying any of the following, we would highly appreciate the assistance.

Jackal Fencing 1,2 m high

Y-Standards 1,5 m high

Droppers 1,2 m high

Wooden Corner Posts of 1,5 m or longer.

Building materials for shelters and dens

Lavender Bushes to protect against flies

Walk for Wolves Netherlands

Nederland Duinreservaat, Netherlands 14 April 2019.

What an amazing journey for such a great cause, the full story is on our Facebook page @huskyromi, please take a moment to read it as it’s full of tips and tricks.

“I would like to thank all participants, sponsors and supporters that helped HuskyRomi on this amazing day, with special mention of Conny who came up with the idea and helped me set it up, and Tahira of Paws & Hands for her contribution in the form of a workshop”.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly illustrated newsletter, mail larry@huskyromi.co.za or committee@huskyromi.co.za and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (defenders@mail.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Stop this death sentence for wolves

The Trump administration wants to abandon wolves once and for all.

The Department of the Interior (DOI) is trying to prematurely strip Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections from nearly all Grey wolves in the lower 48 states. This could be a death sentence for wolves!

Wolves across the country need your help right now – it’s up to us to ensure the continued protection of these majestic animals who have already come so close to extinction.

Tell the DOI to keep ESA protections for imperiled wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=iTFfQ8oFckknqU__ywxS4g

Despite what anti-wolf groups and politicians claim, gray wolves are still in the early stage of their recovery. Today, these wolves occupy just a tiny fraction of their historic range.

Delisting Grey wolves could ruin that progress by leaving them to the mercy of states, many of which are dominated by politicians that see wolves as vermin to be wiped out.

No other species is actively persecuted by politicians the way that wolves are. In the northern Rockies states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, political pressure forced wolves off the endangered species list. Here’s how those states are managing wolves now:

  • In Wyoming, the vast majority of the state is a free-fire zone where hunters can kill a wolf at any time.
  • The wolves of Yellowstone National Park can be hunted once they set foot outside the Park’s boundary.
  • And in Idaho, taxpayer money is used to subsidize wolf extermination through a permanent wolf kill fund.

Act now: Keep Wolf Protections here

Anti-wolf groups in these states have already spread wolf hate that has led to thousands of these animals being killed.

Entire packs have been gunned down from helicopters, wolves have been poisoned with cyanide, shot, caught in cruel traps that starve them to death, and otherwise killed as vermin.

The vicious carnage happening in these states shows us what the future of gray wolves could be in the rest of the lower 48 states if the administration strips their federally protected status.

The DOI is currently taking public comments on this disastrous plan. This is your chance to call on them to protect America’s wolves!

Take action today: Help us fight to keep wolves on the endangered species list: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=BCNvF6NPiLZzOxS7XVOvTQ

Anti-wolf groups are waiting to take aim at more wolves as soon as they lose their protections. These animals need you more than ever – please speak up to keep them safe today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=EZzvlB7DoNNuzbcX2V_X7Q

  1. USA: This administration is abandoning wolves – have you?

No Grey wolf will be safe now that the Trump administration is getting its way.

Right now, the Interior Department is trying to strip nearly all Grey wolves in the lower 48 states of their federal protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

This will be a death sentence for recovering wolves.

Deadly threats like these are why we’ve extended our matching gift campaign: give now through April 30th and your gift will be matched 2-for-1 up to a total of $200,000: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=vhzMi-L25TDLKCcrz4WSQw

Defenders of Wildlife will do whatever it takes to keep this delisting from happening, but we urgently need your help.

We’ve seen what happens when premature delisting leaves wolves at the mercy of anti-wolf state politics. In Northern Rockies states such as Wyoming and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protections. Even the celebrated wolves of Yellowstone can be gunned down the instant they step outside the park boundaries!

Have your gift matched 2-for-1 here

If this ill-conceived plan goes forward, decades of hard-won wolf conservation progress could be halted. And the future of Grey wolf recovery would once again be in jeopardy.

Your urgent donation today will go three times as far. Support our all-out effort to keep gray wolves protected under the ESA here

It’s not too late to stop this. With you at our side Defenders is ready to fight back for wolves:

  • We’re engaging a network of thousands of wolf-lovers like you to demand that our nation’s wolves retain federal protection under the ESA;
  • Our experts are providing key ESA policy and legal analysis, making it clear that delisting is not only premature, but also sets a dangerous precedent for other imperiled animals; and
  • We will take this administration to court to fight this premature and lethal delisting of gray wolves.

Wolves are counting on you to stand up for their continued protection, and to speak out against a delisting that could halt or even reverse decades of progress.

Please donate today, while your gift will make 3x the difference: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=nUG9Hs8hE-bK-PTcqXT5jg

  1. eNews: Wherever wildlife needs a voice, we’re there

Concert for Conservation: http://action.defenders.org/site/r?i=1grm66fncwdnfmr-dumiuq

With red wolves in the south-east suffering from mismanagement and political antagonism, one North Carolina activist came up with an ingenious idea to raise awareness of the wolves’ plight: A Concert for Conservation.

Learn more here: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=_Qo4B8wioE8kW79EidQnzg

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Wolves Are Not Trophies – Oppose USFWS Nationwide Delisting Proposal

He is not a trophy.

On March 15, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) officially proposed removing federal Endangered Species Act protections for nearly all gray wolves across the lower 48 states, a plan that would allow trophy hunting to immediately resume in three states and put the future of the gray wolf and its proven benefits to ecosystems at serious risk.

Delisting wolves has deadly consequences.

History tells us that under the states’ authority to manage wolf populations, wolves die at the hands of trophy hunters. Since 2011, nearly 3,500 wolves have been killed in states where wolves are unprotected.

If Endangered Species Act protections are removed nationwide, more wolves will be trapped and shot. We’re not going to allow that happen without a fight.

Take Action Now: https://engage.nywolf.org/site/R?i=uIl-3O6GQCjDbO8UvrydGA

Sponsor a Wolf Mom
Show your love and appreciation for the mother in your life by sponsoring one of the Wolf Conservation Center’s endangered red wolf and Mexican gray wolf moms!

Learn more here: https://engage.nywolf.org/site/R?i=_Ueg7GYTjM9h01RNQ_MJlw

  1. USA: Mother’s Day Surprise – Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups Born at the Wolf Conservation Center

USA: Elusive. Endangered. Extremely Cute.

Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups Born at the WCC!

Mother’s day came early for Mexican gray wolf Trumpet!

On April 26, the mother of three gave birth to her second litter! Beyond being adorable, the pups represent the Wolf Conservation Center’s active participation in the effort to save a species on the brink of extinction.

The Mexican gray wolf or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998, the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Current estimates put the wild population at 131 in the United States.

To watch the family’s progress, tune in to their live webcams here

  1. Mexican Gray Wolf Pup Born at Wolf Conservation Center Released to the Wild

Endangered Wolf Pup Born at Wolf Conservation Center Joins Wild Den

One small step for an endangered pup, one giant leap for Mexican gray wolves.

SOUTH SALEM, NY (May 15, 2018) — Mother’s Day came early for a critically endangered Mexican gray wolf living at the Wolf Conservation Center (WCC), a non-profit environmental organization dedicated to wolf conservation. On April 26, Mexican gray wolf F1505 (affectionately named Trumpet) gave birth to a litter of five critically endangered pups.

Beyond being cute, the pups represent the WCC’s active participation in an effort to save a species from extinction.

The WCC is one of more than 50 institutions in the U.S. and Mexico participating in the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan a bi-national initiative whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of Mexican wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.

Most wolves born in captivity spend their lives there, but unbeknownst to the largest of the litter, the female pup was destined for a wild future.

On May 9, the two-week-old pup was flown to Arizona and successfully placed in the den of the Saffel wild wolf pack, where the breeding female had recently given birth to her own litter. Cross-fostering is a coordinated event where captive-born pups are introduced into a similar-aged wild litter to be raised by surrogate parents.

According to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (USFWS) Initial Release and Translocation Proposal for 2019, Mexican gray wolves within the wild population are as related to one another as full siblings. This cross-foster recovery technique provides the opportunity to augment the population’s genetics.

Addressing genetic imperilment requires an active program of releasing wolves from the more genetically diverse captive population to mitigate further inbreeding. USFWS’s goal for 2019 is to foster up to 12 pups into the wild in New Mexico and Arizona, with the hope that they will eventually spread their genes to the greater population.

The WCC has been a critical partner in the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program for nearly two decades. To date, three adult Mexican gray wolves from the center have been released in the wild. Participating in a cross-foster, however, is a historic first for the center.

“Trumpet’s pup is part of the critical effort to save her imperiled species,” said Maggie Howell, Executive Director of the WCC. “At just two pounds, she’s a North American superhero! She’s become a living, breathing part of the south-western landscape, and her story will help raise awareness for Mexican gray wolves and the active efforts to save them.”

“The WCC is thrilled to be a part of this important recovery mission,” stated WCC Curator Rebecca Bose. “The collaboration among all who had a hand in delivering Trumpet’s pup to her wild family is a true testament to the dedication of everyone involved. In addition to USFWS, the Arizona Game and Fish Department and WCC veterinarian Paul Maus, DVM were key. We are especially appreciative of a generous friend of the center for providing his plane to transport the precious passenger from New York to Arizona!”

Trumpet and her pups are not on public exhibit, but sixteen live webcams, available on the WCC website, invite an unlimited number of viewers to enter the private lives of these elusive creatures.

Background

The Mexican gray wolf or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of Mexican gray wolves in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998, the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Current estimates put the wild population at 131 in the United States.

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

  1. USA: Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, Monthly Update, March 1-31, 2019

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf  or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf . For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com  and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH .

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Updates

As part of the March 29, 2018 appropriations bills, the U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to obtain an independent assessment on the taxonomic validity of the Mexican gray wolf. The National Academy of Science’s report was published in March, 2019.  The report confirmed the taxonomy of Mexican wolves as a valid subspecies and further determined that there is no evidence that the Mexican gray wolf genome include introgression from domestic dogs.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The end of year census for 2018 was a minimum of 131 Mexican wolves in the wild (64 in AZ and 67 in NM). This was about a 12% increase in the population from a minimum of 117 wolves counted at the end of 2017.Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable.

At the end of March, there were 27 packs (13 in AZ and 14 in NM) and six single collared wolves. There were 80 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wolves are collared. Studbook numbers following individual pack names below denote wolves with functioning radio collars.

IN ARIZONA:

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In March, the IFT continued to document M1477 travelling with an uncollared wolf in their usual territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697)

In March, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1681, mp1789, and f1830)

In March, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Hoodoo Pack was hazed by the IFT on multiple occasions during the month of March to mitigate wolf-livestock conflict on private land. The IFT also established a diversionary food cache to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict with this pack.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, fp1794, and fp1825)

In March, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)

In March, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Rocky Prairie Pack (collared F1489)

In March, the IFT documented F1489 travellling separately from M1829 in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, fp1792 and fp1833)

In March, the Saffel Pack was located within their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Saffel Pack was hazed on multiple occasions to mitigate wolf-livestock conflict near private land.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In March, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1683

In March, f1683 was documented travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF and occasionally on the FAIR.

Single collared AM1382

In March, AM1382 of the Panther Creek Pack was not located. AM1382 was last documented in February, travelling with f1683 of the Bear Wallow Pack in the east central portion of the ASNF and occasionally on the FAIR.

Single collared M1574

In March, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF and the SCAR.

Single collared f1686

In March, the IFT documented yearling f1686 continuing to make dispersal movements within the north central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF) in New Mexico and the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1829

In late March, M1829 was documented making large movements into the western portion of the GNF in New Mexico.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In March, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)

In March, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559 and AF1283)

In March, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory and occasionally documented north of their territory on the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared F1679 and AM1338)

In March, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.  AM1338, formerly of the Bear Wallow Pack, has been documented consistently travelling with F1679 and now meets criteria for being considered part of the Tu dil hil Pack.

Poker Pack (collared F1674)

In March, F1674 was documented travelling separately from Tsay-O-Ah pack on the eastern FAIR and occasionally on the SCAR. F1674 was documented travelling with an uncollared wolf for a period of time that meets the criteria for being consider a new pack.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (F1444)

During March F1444, the only wolf with a functioning collar in the Copper Creek Pack, was documented making wide dispersal movements in New Mexico outside the pack’s traditional range.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354, AF1456, and mp1717)

During March, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Datil Mountain Pack (collared F1685)

During March, the Datil Mountain Pack travelled within their traditional territory in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF), as well as portions of the ASNF in Arizona.  F1685 was documented travelling with Iron Creek M1821 for most of March.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and fp1702)

During March, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, f1670, m1821, fp1721, mp1710 and fp1712)

During March, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  In March, M1556 was located dead in New Mexico; the incident is under investigation.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285, AF1405, and mp1715)

During March, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leon Pack (single collared M1824 and f1578)

In March, M1824 was documented travelling with San Mateo f1578 in the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico. They have been named the Leon Pack.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During March, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and mp1831)

During March, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1705 and m1832)

During March, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential conflict with livestock in March.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, and mp1827)

During March, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. During March, fp1835 and fp1836 were captured and removed to captivity as part of a management order. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock in March.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399, fp1822, and fp1834)

During March, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During March, AF1553 was confirmed travelling in the traditional territory of the SBP Pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788 and M1349)

During March, the Squirrel Springs Pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single F1684

During March F1684 was located travelling with M1827 of the Prieto Pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

MORTALITIES

During the month of March, M1556 of the Iron Creek Pack was located dead in New Mexico. Single M1677 was also located dead in Arizona during March. Both incidents are under investigation.

From January 1, 2019 to March 31, 2019, there have been a total of six documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of March, there were 20 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock and one confirmed wolf depredation on a dog.  There was one nuisance incident investigated in March.  From January 1, 2019 to March 31, 2019 there have been a total of 42 confirmed and three probable wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and five confirmed depredation incidents in Arizona.

On March 3, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead dog in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the dog was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf and two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined that the calf and one cow were confirmed wolf depredations. The cause of death for the second cow was unknown.

On March 11, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 12, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 14, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both cows were confirmed wolf depredations.

On March 19, Wildlife Services investigated four dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined three cows were confirmed wolf depredations, one cow died from unknown cause.

On March 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 22, the IFT took a report of an elk killed by wolves next to a house near Alpine, AZ.  The IFT investigated the report and determined wolves from the Hoodoo Pack had killed a cow elk overnight within 50 feet of the residence. The carcass was removed to eliminate any attractant to wolves returning to the area.

On March 23, Wildlife Services investigated an injured horse that later died from injuries in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the horse was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 24, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull and a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined the bull and calf were both confirmed wolf depredations.

On March 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a probable wolf depredation.

On March 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow and calf in Greenlee County, AZ.  The investigation determined the two animals were confirmed as having been killed by wolves and classified as one depredation incident.

On March 28, Wildlife Services investigated three dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined one cow was a confirmed wolf depredation and two were probable wolf depredations.

On March 28, Wildlife Services investigated a colt that was injured and later euthanized in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the colt was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On March 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

The USFWS attended a USFS Forest Leadership Team meeting in Reserve, NM.

The USFWS and AZGFD attended the Mexican Wolf Livestock Council meeting in Springerville, AZ.

In March, WMAT contributed an article to “Nature’s Newsletter”, a publication of the Delaware Valley Eagle Alliance, on the WMAT Mexican Wolf Tribal Youth Conservation Program.

On March 6, 2019, the Alpine Conservation Law Enforcement Officer (CLEO) provided outreach training to students from the University of the Southwest in Hobbs, New Mexico.  The Alpine CLEO spoke to criminal justice and vertebrate zoology students providing an overview of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and endangered species to include the Mexican gray wolf.

On March 11, WMAT presented to Canyon Day Cattle Association in Whiteriver, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

Sara Eno started with USFWS at the end of March.  Sara was a part of the IFT as the WMAT Field Team Leader and will be transitioning into the role of the Pinetop biologist for the USFWS.  Sara did an outstanding job as the WMAT Field Team Leader and will continue to work with the WMAT and AGFD in her new role.  Congratulations Sara!

  1. USA: Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, Monthly Update, April 1-30, 2019

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update
On March 30, 2019, a court ruling from the District Court of Arizona regarding several alleged violations of the Endangered Species Act and the Administrative Procedures Act of the 2017 Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, First Revision, were denied while the court accepted one element for review; therefore, USFWS will provide an administrative record to the court for further review of the basis for the recovery plan’s criteria and actions.

USFWS staff presented Mexican wolf updates and future recovery recommendations at the Canada/Mexico/U.S. Trilateral Committee meeting in Victoria, British Columbia from April 8 through 12. Also participating were representatives from the Arizona and New Mexico Game and Fish Departments.

On April 17, the 25-month timeline to revise the 10(j) rule for the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area was initiated by the District Court of Arizona, resulting in a deadline of May 1, 2021 for the revised final 10(j) rule.  The 2015 10(j) rule will stay in effect until the new revision is finalized.
CURRENT POPULATION STATUS
The end of year census for 2018 was a minimum of 131 Mexican wolves in the wild (64 in AZ and 67 in NM). This was about a 12% increase in the population from a minimum of 117 wolves counted at the end of 2017.Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable.

At the end of April, there were 27 identified wolf packs (13 in AZ and 14 in NM) and three single collared wolves. There were 80 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wolves are collared. Studbook numbers following individual pack names below denote wolves with functioning radio collars.

IN ARIZONA:
Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)
In April, the IFT continued to document M1477 traveling with an uncollared wolf in the pack’s territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, F1668, M1671, m1695, f1696, and f1697) 
In April, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF in Arizona and New Mexico. A male yearling, m1693, was captured by Wildlife Services in New Mexico and transported to captivity for veterinary care. Yearling m1693, was cross-fostered as a neonatal pup from captivity into the Elk Horn Pack in 2018.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, M1681, F1830, and m1789)
In April, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Hoodoo Pack was hazed by the IFT on one occasion during the month of April to mitigate wolf-livestock conflict. This month, three neonatal pups, born in captivity at the Mesker Park Zoo, were cross-fostered by the IFT into the Hoodoo Pack den. One wild born pup was removed to reduce the Hoodoo Pack litter number and subsequently cross-fostered into the Panther Creek Pack den. The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for livestock-related conflict.  The Hoodoo Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted.

Panther Creek Pack (AM1382 and AF1683)
In April, AM1382 and AF1683 were documented traveling together in the east central portion of the ASNF and are now considered Panther Creek Pack. This month the IFT cross-fostered one wild-born neonatal pup taken from the Hoodoo Pack into the Panther Creek den subsequent to a cross-foster event of genetically valuable pups from captivity into the Hoodoo Pack den. The IFT initiated a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort. The Panther Creek Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, f1794, and f1825)
In April, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, m1790, f1791, and f1823)
In April, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. In April, the IFT cross-fostered one neonatal pup, born in captivity at the Endangered Wolf Center into the Prime Canyon den. The IFT initiated a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for conflict. The Prime Canyon Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted.

Rocky Prairie Pack (collared F1489)
In April, the IFT documented F1489 in the east central portion of the ASNF. The Rocky Prairie Pack began to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning at the end of April.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, f1792 and f1833)
In April, the Saffel Pack was located within their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Saffel Pack exhibited behaviour consistent with denning at the end of April.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)
In April, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Sierra Blanca Pack exhibited behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Single collared M1574
In April, the IFT documented M1574 traveling in the east central portion of the ASNF and the SCAR.

Single collared F1686
In April, the IFT documented subadult F1686 continuing to make dispersal movements within the north central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF) in New Mexico and the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1829
In April, M1829 was documented making wide dispersal movements in the GNF and in the east central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR: 

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)
In April, the Baldy Pack was located in their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and north central portion of the ASNF. 

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and f1828)
In April, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF. Maverick Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559 and AF1283)
In April, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and occasionally documented north of their territory on the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared F1679 and AM1338)
In April, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented traveling in the eastern portion of the FAIR. Tu dil hil Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Poker Pack (collared F1674)
In April, the Poker Pack was documented traveling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the SCAR.
IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack 
During April, F1444 was captured by a private trapper.  The IFT was notified and subsequently removed the wolf to captivity due to livestock depredations.  F1444 was the only remaining wolf in the Copper Creek Pack, which is now considered defunct.  F1444 subsequently died in captivity.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354, AF1456, and m1717)
During April, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented traveling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF). The Dark Canyon Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared F1685)
During April, the Datil Mountain Pack traveled within their traditional territory in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443, f1701, and f1702)
During April, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. This month, five neonatal pups born in captivity at the Endangered Wolf Center were cross-fostered by the IFT into the Frieborn Pack den. Three wild pups were transported back to captivity. The IFT initiated a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for livestock-related conflict. The Frieborn Pack exhibited behaviour and movements consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted. A female subadult, f1701, was captured, collared, and released in April.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, F1670, M1821, f1721, m1710 and f1712)
During April, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. The Iron Creek Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285, AF1405, and m1715)
During April, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  The Lava Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April. 

Leon Pack (single collared M1824 and F1578)
In April, the Leon pack was documented within the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.
 
Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During April, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness. The Leopold Pack exhibited behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and m1831)
During April, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The Luna Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, F1705 and M1832)
During April, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential conflict with livestock. The Mangas Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, and m1827)
During April, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock in April.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1822)
During April, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  In mid-April, f1834 slipped free of its radio collar. The San Mateo Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)
During April, AF1553 was confirmed traveling in the traditional territory of the SBP Pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788 and M1349)
During April, the Squirrel Springs Pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF. The Squirrel Springs Pack showed behaviour consistent with denning in April.

Whitewater Canyon Pack (F1684 and M1827) 
During April F1684 and M1827 continued to be documented traveling together in the north central portion of the GNF and are now considered the Whitewater Canyon Pack.

MORTALITIES

There were no documented mortalities during the month of April. From January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2019, there have been a total of six documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of April, there were 37 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock.  From January 1, 2019 to April 30, 2019 there have been a total of 77 confirmed and five probable wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 11 confirmed depredation incidents in Arizona.

On April 3, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 5, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows and two dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined all four were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull and two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the all three were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 8, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined that both cows were confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 8, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 10, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 12, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both cows were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 14, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 14, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow and a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 16, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows and three dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both cows and all three calves were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 18, Wildlife Services investigated two dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both calves were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 20, Wildlife Services investigated two dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined both calves were confirmed wolf depredations.

On April 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead yearling bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the yearling bull was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 24, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 24, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined calf was a probable wolf depredation.

On April 26, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a probable wolf depredation.

On April 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On April 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead yearling bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the yearling bull was a confirmed wolf depredation.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On April 2, IFT staff attended a livestock grazing workshop in Alpine, Arizona, hosted by Defenders of Wildlife.

On April 17, IFT staff attended a ranching workshop hosted by the X Diamond Ranch in Arizona and provided a Mexican Wolf Recovery Program update.

On April 26, WMAT staff hosted an educational booth in coordination with the Tribal Environmental Protection Office, for Earth Day.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

Tracy Melbihess was re-hired by the USFWS as the Classification, Recovery, and Litigation Coordinator for the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program from her position as a Conservation and Consultation Branch Chief at the Idaho Ecological Services Field Office.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AZGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

From Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

Our chance to speak out against the Trump Administration’s outrageous plan to strip gray wolves of protections ends at midnight on May 14th. Have you submitted your comment?

Submit your public comment opposing the Trump Administration’s proposed national wolf delisting here

Gray wolves have only begun to recover. They occupy a fraction of their historic range and have yet to re-establish themselves in suitable wild spaces from California to Colorado to Maine. The work is not finished and the Department of Interior has no business declaring “victory” and walking away. Yet, that is just what they are proposing to do by stripping virtually all gray wolves in the lower-48 of Endangered Species Act protections.

Tell the Department of Interior to keep wolves protected until they are truly recovered  here 

From Brigitte Sommer via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

  1. Germany: Escalating media harassment revolving around the wolf – Please support us!

Elections are coming up in some federal states and for the EU parliament. Lobbyist groups are now pulling all the stops to radically press through their interests. Many of the media have jumped on the hype and publish hair-raising reprints of statements from the hunter and farmer lobby without bothering with checking facts first. Even primetime news joined in.

We oppose this might with our pro-wolf documentary and our media initiative “Menschen für Wölfe” [“People pro Wolves”]. But we urgently need support for our work if we are to be able to counter these powerful lobbies. They have nearly unlimited funding – we don’t! … We need our Earth. It is our base, our home, and we can only conserve it if we eventually stop being the most destructive species on our planet.

The wolf returned to Germany on his own. He offers us a chance to turn around, because he is able to reverse damages we have inflicted on Nature. We must make the best of this opportunity. With your donation to our new Crowdfunding initiative,

www.gofundme.com/menschen-fur-wolfe,

you can help the wolf keep his home in Germany.

You can also support us via PayPal at PayPal.Me/menschenfuerwoelfe  

or by EFT, the details for which can be requested from menschenfuerwoelfe@pr-nanny.de

And: Every donator stands a chance of winning something!

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolf numbers in Yellowstone Park decline

by Mark Davis (mark@powelltribune.com)

A member of the Wapiti Lake Pack is silhouetted by a nearby hot spring in Yellowstone National Park last year. The park’s wolf population has declined in recent years.

The Grey wolf population in Yellowstone National Park has dropped to about 80 wolves, officials say — less than half of the high population mark in the park.

While Yellowstone leaders won’t have an accurate count until the fall after surviving pups are visible, the park’s top biologist doesn’t expect numbers to rise dramatically after litters are included in population estimates.

“Unfortunately, many of them die. Grey pup survival is about 7 percent,” Doug Smith, long-time project leader for the Wolf Restoration Project in Yellowstone, said in a Wednesday video broadcast on the park’s Facebook page.

“Eighty wolves is kind of a drop from what we had,” Smith said, noting that Yellowstone had as many as 174 wolves in the park back in 2003.

Numbers leveled off in 2008 at about 100 individuals in the park, but have since dropped; Smith largely blamed outbreaks of disease — including distemper, mange and the parvo virus — and packs moving out of the park for the decline.

Smith said the leading cause of natural mortality is wolves killing wolves.

“They’re ferociously territorial,” he said.

Wolves in the park have about an 80 percent chance surviving through a given year, Smith said, and the species typically only lives five to six years in the park’s wilderness. He said a 20 percent mortality rate is high, but typical of wolf ecology.

“They were built to endure mortality,” Smith said. “They have a high turnover rate; they deal with death.”

There are about 250 wolves still in the wild outside Yellowstone in Wyoming, according to Wyoming Game and Fish Department estimates.

Smith said his staff is working to avoid any unnecessary mortality to individuals in packs inside Yellowstone.

“The rules change when wolves leave the park,” he said. “The task of large carnivore biologists inside the park is preservation of the species. But once a wolf wanders beyond the invisible boundaries of the park, the treatment of wolves then changes to conservation.”

Wyoming’s second hunting season recently ended with hunters unable to fill a 58-wolf quota, even with an expanded season. Wolves that venture outside the north-western corner of the state are not counted toward population estimates and can be killed without limit year round. More than 80 wolves were killed by hunters last year between the north-western trophy zone and the so-called predator zone.

Approximately another 50 wolves were lethally removed by the Game and Fish and USDA Wildlife Services trappers in conflict management last year.

Smith suggested that only a few wolves from Yellowstone packs are killed in hunts near park boundaries, but he said the harvest of the wrong individual can upset pack dynamics. Yellowstone biologists are studying the effects of hunting in conjunction with other national parks — including Grand Teton and Denali. That’s part of an effort to preserve not just a secure population, but social structure.

“If you lose the wrong individual at the wrong time, it can destabilize the pack dynamics,” Smith said.

As he took questions on Facebook Live, Smith disputed complaints that the wrong wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone. Some take issue with the fact that the animals brought to the park were the subspecies Canis lupus occidentalis (the north-western or Canadian wolf) instead of Canis lupus irremotus (the northern Rocky Mountain wolf).

“A lot of people that don’t like [wolves] emphasize the word Canadian,” Smith said. “These wolves are a whiskers difference than the wolves that were here.”

Smith said all wolves can interbreed and there is very little geography that can isolate wolf subspecies, saying they should all be called “North American wolves.” He did say that wolves are smaller in the south than the north, and that the wolves reintroduced in Yellowstone were latitudinal different from wolves that previously lived in Wyoming. However, he said the difference wasn’t significant enough to make a difference.

Smith also defended the reintroduction and pointed to the species popularity with most visitors to the region.

“Wolves are one of the top attractions in Yellowstone,” he said. “And it’s one of the best places in the world to view wolves.”

Original article at

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 161

Wolf Pups Dream

by Jennifer Tissot

From within the warm, secure den, I watch Father, his coat thick and white as the snow under his paws, disappears into the deep woods beyond for the night’s hunt.

I whine in disappointment of not being able to hunt with them because I’m still young.

“Very soon,” begins my older brother sitting beside me, “you’ll be out there leading the pack just like him and mother.”

I know this is true but it seems so far away when I think about it.

My sister nuzzles me with her stout nose to play a game with her.

My brother is amused and tells me to not think of hunting, but to live and enjoy my precious moments as a pup.

“You’ll be a grown wolf soon enough,” he says.

Feeling a twitch of hope within my heart, I race after my sister and over the cold, powdery face of Mother Earth.

I tumble and roll within the flying flakes of Mother Earth’s hair so white and clean, knowing that I will someday be a leader, a hunter, and a father of a pack all my own.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

Nothing to report this month, but

Will be continued…

Volume 14, Issue 174, April 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 174, April 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

Actually, I dread every new newsletter that I have to go through and edit, simply because it will be then at the latest that I have to read about all the gunk the least civilized bipedal population on Earth has been up to for the past four weeks. It is no different this time. Read the News section to see what I mean.

One good thing from this doomed continent is scientific research that has now irrefutably confirmed the separate taxonomic statuses of Red and Mexican Gray Wolves. Anti-wolf lobbyists now may find it more difficult to just bang away at them, at least in the eyes of the law, I hope.

I would to draw your attention to the excerpt of Husky Romi’s last newsletter that we have reprinted here. Neighbours that threaten somebody with shooting at a neighbour because they don’t want him walking his leashed canine in the street? What is that? I was really shocked to read it.

And – if you happen to live in The Netherlands or nearby: There is something for you!

A wolf tale and Erin’s latest update round off the newsletter for this month.

Till the next,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration here

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration: https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=d1c0d9f9d6&e=c4f881378d

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From the Sanctuary

We are so glad to see the back end of March. This has been a terrible month for us, the freezer packed up and the repairs were just way out of our price range. We ended up installing a new compressor and refrigeration unit that doesn’t come from Germany with German price tags on everything.  R56 000.00 later and we are up and running. Kim raised a sizable amount of money in Europe and other smaller much appreciated donations. We are still R21 000.00 short, but we needed the freezer for all our chicken.

On a positive note, we still have Frans Badenhorst around and he will be helping me with the newsletter, thank you from the bottom of my heart.

A Ranting from Frans

Well, I am still around. We had no takers for the distribution of the newsletter and the upkeep of the mailing list, so for now I will attempt to do it to the best of my ability. Somebody did offer to do the final proof read, but that alone will unfortunately not solve our problem.

After an altercation with somebody this morning, while I was taking Titus out for his regular walk, where I was threatened that both my dog and myself will be shot, I realized what exactly my biggest problem in my life is. It is other people. This is probably also the reason why I have difficulty in keeping up with my duties with the newsletter because I just cannot keep up any longer with the arrogance, negativity and ignorance being flung at me from people who are supposed to be on the same side.

Those of you that know me will know that I in general mind my own business as far as that it is possible. I have almost no friends and no social life at all. I spend my time at home when I am not working. I only leave the sanctuary of my home to go to work, drop Lindi off at school, walk the animals, or quickly go to the supermarket to get supplies, avoiding interaction even with people I know as much as possible. My support structure consists solely of my wife and my daughter. So, yes, I am becoming more and more of a recluse by the day. I know it and I am quite content with it.

Enough of my rant, but please, can somebody finding it easier to deal with people in general take over from me, even if it is just for a while to give me a break?

Frans.

Ps – After I have written the above “ranting”, I obtained some legal advice regarding the issues I am having more and more while out on the streets walking my dogs. Even though it is my right to do what I do in the way I do it, I was advised to rather stop walking the animals in the area where the residents refuse to keep their dogs off the streets while unleashed. I was informed to rather keep my animals safe than wait for somebody (or some other dog) to harm them or me. It is sad because my almost daily walks have been an important part of my life as well as the life of my furry friends for quite a number of years, but I must agree that it is probably better to play it safe.

To add on to this – I mentioned to Cathy this morning that it is a week now since I stopped taking the animals out for a walk and it does not seem if they are worried about it at all. The time that we would have taken to walk, I now play with them on the lawn in the back yard. The way they can run and tumble makes me think that the exercise they get is just as good as what they could get from a three km walk. Maybe I am chatting myself in, but it seems positive thus far although I am still extremely upset about the whole situation. Waiting for Karma ……….

Walk for Wolves Netherlands

I have been volunteering at the sanctuary since last year May I was with Larry and all the animals from mid May to end September, give or take a week or two in between. I have always wanted to work with and help animals and HuskyRomi has become the place where I know I want to stay for the long haul The sanctuary to me is a place of lost and found – I lost a piece of my heart there, and I found a piece that was missing – the immense beauty of the Free State and the unconditional love and connections with the animals brought a feeling of coming home. With this I decided to help where I could, including when I am in Holland where I live.

Conny, a dear friend of mine who also does a lot for animal welfare gave me so many ideas, and after many phone calls and brainstorming sessions we came up with our first Dutch event. So, we kick off with Walk for Wolves! Walk for Wolves is an event where people can sign up to participate in a 10km walk, a workshop, something to eat and drink, and a small present as a memory of their participation, all for €20,00. The place we have chosen for this year (I plan to turn this into a recurring event with different locations) is in the stunning area of the Noordhollands Duinreservaat. Stretching over 5.300 hectares, the reservation is one of the biggest natural areas in Holland, the dunes are important for their function as natural seawalls, an area of natural recreation, and water extraction! It is criss-crossed with a network of well-maintained trails and grazing areas for the various animals that the reservation is well known for I hope Walk for Wolves will be a success and that it is the start of many more amazing events and experiences, helping realize part of Larry’s dream – creating the start of HuskyRomi Holland and in doing so taking steps towards making Romi the most famous Husky in the world.

If you have any friends, family, fans, vague acquaintances in Holland please be so kind as to forward them the details of the event and ask them to participate? For people with Facebook you can follow: https://www.facebook.com/events/2254039858182075/

Links to give you an impression of the sanctuary and Heemskerk: https://www.facebook.com/huskyromi/ HuskyRomi Facebook page http://huskyromi.co.za/wp/ HuskyRomi website http://www.gasterijkruisberg.nl/ the Gasterij Restaurant To join please send me an email (committee@huskyromi.co.za) with your phone number and email details

Video details: https://youtu.be/BtLnLhWe3P4

Animal Facts – Marijuana / Cannabis Use

You can read this article in the HuskyRomi Newsletter

Comment from the Sanctuary

I’m no expert when it comes to medication, Frans is a medical doctor so I can only talk from personal experience. We started using cannabis oil at the sanctuary and we have seen a lot of good since we have started using it, my only concern is the amount of THC that is still in some of the cannabis oil that we have used. My recommendation is that when buying cannabis oil is that you use someone with a very good reputation and not just anyone who sells it, remember this is your animals’ life, it may cost a little more but these people have done a lot of research and only use the right plant for the job, a lot of other people are just using cannabis to make oil and don’t care about the THC content in the oil.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (defenders@mail.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Seven wolves killed in Idaho!

Heart breaking news from Idaho. We just learned that seven wolves were killed in the remote northern Lolo region of the state. The killings are intended to boost elk numbers so that hunters will have more elk to shoot.

This is just another example of the deadly risks to wolves when they lose federal Endangered Species Act protection.

And it’s why your support today is so urgently important

We hoped this day would never come.

The Interior Department is moving forward with a plan to strip Grey wolves of all protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

As their latest and most heinous attack on our nation’s wildlife, this is nothing short of a death sentence for countless wolves.

Please donate today and help support our all-out effort to protect Grey wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=V8YtFAku0kY98rLnXy8kbg

We’ve seen what happens when premature delisting leaves wolves to the mercy of anti-wolf politics and politicians that are unwilling to protect them. In Northern Rockies states such as Wyoming and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protections.

If this disastrous plan goes forward, decades of hard-won wolf conservation progress could be destroyed, and the future of gray wolf recovery would once again be in jeopardy. Defenders of Wildlife will do whatever it takes to keep this from happening, but we urgently need your help.

Your urgent donation today will help support our all-out effort to keep Grey wolves protected under the ESA: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=ftLGb37OaK4MPtTGIhctJQ

It’s not too late to stop this despicable proposal. Defenders is ready to fight back for wolves:

  • We’re engaging a network of thousands of wolf-lovers like you to demand ongoing wolf protections at the first sign of this outrageous proposal moving forward;
  • Our experts are providing key ESA policy and legal analysis, making it clear that delisting is not only premature, it also sets a dangerous precedent for other imperiled animals; and
  • We will take this administration to court to fight this premature delisting of gray wolves.

Wolves are counting on you to stand up for their continued protection, and to speak out against a delisting that could halt or even reverse decades of progress.

Please donate today, while we can still make a difference

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Feds Launch New Effort to Delist Wolves and Allow Trophy Hunting Seasons

He is not a trophy.

Last week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) formally announced (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=9c1a2b2c3c&e=c4f881378d) its plan to remove federal Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states – a plan that would allow trophy hunting to immediately resume in four states and put the future of the gray wolf and its proven benefits to ecosystems at serious risk.
Please take action today here

  1. USA: Scientific Report Finds Red Wolf and Lobo as “Taxonomically Valid”

Is the Red wolf a distinct species or, as critics in North Carolina have long contended, a hybrid unworthy of Endangered Species Act protection? What about the Mexican Grey wolf – is the Lobo a “real” subspecies?
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) recognizes both as valid and lists each as endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).
Although politicians should leave decisions about whether a species is deserving of protection to scientists and experts at wildlife agencies – these questions were posed by some members of Congress seeking to remove federal ESA protections the rare and at-risk wolves.
In a provision tucked away in the 2018 must-pass budget bill last March, Congress ordered the USFWS to get an independent analysis of whether red wolves and Mexican gray wolves are a taxonomically valid species and subspecies, respectively.
Over the past year, an expert panel appointed by the National Academies of Sciences (NAS), Engineering, and Medicine has been conducting an analysis of scientific literature to answer the following two questions:

  1. Is the Red wolf a taxonomically valid species?
  2. Is the Mexican Grey wolf a taxonomically valid subspecies?

In its new report released today, Evaluating the Taxonomic Status of the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf, NAS confirms that both Red wolves and Mexican Grey wolves are indeed valid taxa.

“A majority of experts on Red wolf taxonomy have concluded, time and time again, that the Red wolf represents a unique lineage that is worthy of conservation and should remain a listable entity under the ESA,” stated Maggie Howell, Wolf Conservation Center Executive Director. “No longer plagued by questions of taxonomy, USFWS needs to re-evaluate its recent decisions and management changes and bring its efforts back in line with the conservation mandate of the ESA. Today’s findings give USFWS no excuse to further delay its recommitment to recovering the red wolf within the current five-county Red Wolf Recovery Area in North Carolina.”

The Red wolf and Mexican Grey wolf are among the most endangered mammals in North America. Both species at one time were extinct in the wild. At last count, an estimated 114 wild Mexican Grey wolves remain in the U.S. Only 24 wild Red wolves are known to remain.

Read more here

 

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE February 1-28, 2019

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

The Federal government shutdown resulted in a delay of the annual helicopter count and capture operation by 19 days; however, the count was conducted in February within the appropriate time frame.

USFWS Regional Director Amy Lueders and Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator Brady McGee attended the WMAT Council Meeting on February 13.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

Year-end population counts for 2018 concluded during the month of February. The year-end minimum population count for 2018 will be released by the USFWS in March. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable.

At the end of February, there were 32 packs (15 in AZ and 17 in NM) and seven single collared wolves. There were 82 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wild wolves are collared. Studbook numbers following individual pack names below denote wolves with functioning radio collars.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338)

In February, the IFT documented AM1338 travelling with F1679 of the Tu dil hil Pack in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In February, the IFT continued to document M1477 travelling with an uncollared wolf in their usual territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697)

In February, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, mp1789, and f1830)

In February, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. During the annual helicopter count and capture, f1830 was captured, collared, and released.

New Pair (collared M1829 and F1489)

In February, the IFT documented F1489 travelling with M1829 in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture, M1829 was captured, collared and released. If this pair continues to travel together in March a new pack name will be determined before the March update is posted.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, fp1794, and fp1825)

In February, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. AF1562 died in AZ after being captured by the IFT to replace a non-functioning GPS collar during the annual helicopter count and capture.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)

In February, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, f1792 and fp1833)

In February, the Saffel Pack was located within their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. During the annual helicopter count and capture fp1833 was captured, collared and released.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In February, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1683

In February, f1683, a yearling from Bear Wallow Pack, was documented travelling with AM1382 of the Panther Creek Pack in the east central portion of the ASNF and occasionally on the FAIR.

Single collared AM1382

In February, M1382 of the Panther Creek Pack was documented travelling with f1683 of the Bear Wallow Pack in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the FAIR.

Single collared M1574

In February, the IFT documented M1574 travelling with an uncollared wolf in the east central portion of the ASNF and the SCAR.

Single collared f1686

In February, the IFT documented yearling f1686 continuing to make dispersal movements within the eastern portion of the ASNF and most recently in the north central portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

Single collared m1677

In February, Hoodoo m1677 was documented making wide dispersal movements in New Mexico and the central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In February, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)

In February, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture, a new collar was deployed on AF1291.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559, AF1283, and f1674)

In February, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory and occasionally documented north of their territory on the FAIR. Additionally, f1674 was documented on the SCAR. During the annual helicopter count and capture, a new collar was deployed on f1674.

Single collared F1679

In February, F1679 of the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR. F1679 was occasionally documented on the SCAR. During the annual count and capture, F1679 and Bear Wallow AM1338 were documented travelling together.

Single collared M1824

In February, M1824 was documented travelling with San Mateo f1578 in the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (F1444)

During February F1444, the only wolf with a functioning collar in the Copper Creek Pack, was documented making wide dispersal movements in New Mexico outside the pack’s traditional range.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354, AF1456, and mp1717)

During February, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, mp1717 was captured, collared and released. In May 2018, mp1717 was cross-fostered by the IFT from the wild Lava Pack litter into the Dark Canyon Pack litter to reduce litter size and increase the chance of survival of two genetically valuable pups from captivity fostered into the Lava Pack.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared F1685)

During February, the Datil Mountain Pack travelled within their traditional territory in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF), as well as portions of the ASNF in Arizona.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and fp1702)

During February, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, M1556, f1670, m1821, fp1721, mp1710 and fp1712)

During February, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, fp1712 was captured, collared and released. Female pup 1712 was cross-fostered by the IFT in May of 2018 from the Endangered Wolf Center into the Iron Creek den.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285, AF1405, and mp1715)

During February, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture, mp1715 was captured, collared, and released.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During February, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and mp1831)

During February, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  Also during February, a private trapper captured mp1831. The IFT was notified and processed, collared and released the animal on site.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1705 and m1832)

During February, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, m1832 was captured, collared and released. The IFT established a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential conflict with livestock in February.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, and mp1827)

During February, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. During February, M1678 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock in February.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399, f1578, fp1822, and fp1834)

During February, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  Collared female f1578 has continued to travel with single M1824 in the north central portion of the GNF. During the annual helicopter count and capture fp1834 was captured, collared, and released.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During February, AF1553 was confirmed travelling in the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788 and M1349)

During February, the Squirrel Springs pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared M1673

During February M1673 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident in under investigation.

Single F1684

During February F1684 was located travelling in the north central portion of the GNF.

MORTALITIES

During the month of February, AF1562 of the Pine Spring Pack died in AZ after being captured by the IFT to replace a non-functioning GPS collar during the annual helicopter count and capture. M1678 of the Prieto Pack was located dead in New Mexico. Single M1673 was located dead in New Mexico. All of the incidents are under investigation.

From January 1, 2019 to February 28, 2019, there have been a total of 4 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of February, there were eight confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock; determination of one investigation in NM is still pending. There was one nuisance incident investigated in February.  From January 1, 2019 to February 28, 2019 there have been a total of 18 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and two confirmed depredation incidents in Arizona.

On February 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On February 11, WMAT investigated a dead cow. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown illness.

On February 12, the IFT took a nuisance report involving wolves in Catron County, NM. The reporting party told the IFT he was on horseback with hounds and that six wolves came within 50 yards. The outfitter yelled and ran at the wolves and the wolves left the area.

On February 12, Wildlife Services investigated an injured horse in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation concluded the cause of the injuries were unknown.

On February 13, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined that one cow was a confirmed wolf depredation; the determination on the second cow is still pending.

On February 15, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined both cows were confirmed wolf depredations.

On February 19, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined both cows were confirmed wolf depredations.

On February 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On February 19, Wildlife Services investigated an injured cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation concluded the cause of the injuries were unknown.

On February 25, WS investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On February 8, WMAT presented an update on KNNB radio in Whiteriver, AZ.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

From SanWild Wildlife Trust (lizel@sanwild.org)

  1. Discounted accommodation offer to raise funds

This is an amazing offer that cannot be missed!

Imagine the entire camp to yourself and 10 friends/family for only R7000 / $500 a night.

This is a special fundraiser to help support our Counter Poaching Units on the ground, because without them, our wildlife and especially our rhinos are under constant threat. You will meet the animals that you are helping and see what SanWild is all about.

Please help us, help and safeguard all the animals at SanWild.

Email us now to book one of 5 vouchers available. We will offer 5 of these vouchers every month to support our rangers in the field. Dont miss out!

Vouchers can be bought now and used at a later stage. Vouchers are valid for 12 months and are subject to availability.

Email: reservations@sanwild.org for more info or phone us on 083 459 4913 or book your voucher now here

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

From Change.org, Salty Dog via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

1. USA: Suspected Rhino Poacher Killed by Elephant, Eaten by Lions in South Africa

I’d say well done. Poachers killed 769 rhinos in South Africa in 2018, according to the country’s environmental affairs ministry.

Read here what happened.

South African authorities say they have recovered the remains of a suspected rhinoceros poacher who was believed to have been killed by an elephant before his body was devoured by lions.

The victim’s family say they were informed of his death by fellow members of a poaching gang that entered Kruger National Park in northeastern South Africa on Tuesday, South African National Parks said in a release (https://www.sanparks.org/about/news/default.php?id=57777).

The family then called state police, who sent a search party to the area even as four other poachers from the group were arrested.

The man’s remains were found on Thursday — but not before a pride of lions got to them.

“Indications found at the scene suggested that a pride of lions had devoured the remains, leaving only a human skull and a pair of pants,” park authorities said.

The head of Kruger National Park expressed his condolences to the family of the deceased suspected poacher, saying that his death was a tragic reminder of the dangers of illegal entry into the park.

“Entering Kruger National Park illegally and on foot is not wise, it holds many dangers and this incident is evidence of that,” said the park’s managing executive Glenn Phillips.

“It is very sad to see the daughters of the deceased mourning the loss of their father — and worse still, only being able to recover very little of his remains.”

The four arrested individuals will appear in court in due course, officials said.

South Africa is believed to have around 80 per cent of the world’s rhino population of over 20,000, making it an epicenter of the global poaching crisis.

Poachers killed 769 rhinos in South Africa in 2018, according to the country’s environmental affairs ministry. That figure represents a 25 per cent drop from 2017.

Rhinos are targeted by poachers for their horns, which fetch big money from black markets in countries like Vietnam, where they are prized for their purported ability to cure health ailments ranging from cancer to erectile dysfunction.

There’s no evidence that rhino horn, made of the same substance as human fingernails, actually holds any medicinal value.

Rhino horn is also bought and consumed as a symbol of wealth, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

There is an international ban on the trade in rhino horn.

Article by By Rahul Kalvapalle National Online Journalist  Global News at

(Ed.: Very little sympathy from me here!)

Wolves and Wolfdogs

What do South Tyroleans think about the return of the Wolf?

In an Online research, run by Eurac Research, 1818 South Tyroleans [Switzerland] were asked about their thoughts on the return of the wolf and 70% of them said that they wanted to know more about the wolf, his behavior, and his appearance in their country. 43% of the people asked said that they have no idea how many wolves are presently living in their area. The majority of the interviewees prefer preventive protection measures like fences, livestock guard dogs or shepherds to shooting the animals. For the first time the researchers of Eurac Research have questioned the South Tyrolean public and tourists in their study about what they, apart from media reports, really think about the wolf.

Although the study does not claim to be representative it shows tendencies that were so far not being considered in the discussion about the return of the Wolf. The majority of the questioned South Tyroleans accept the wolf in their living area and are not scared of sharing it with wolves. The researchers also interviewed 46 livestock farmers, hunters and representatives of the tourist sector from all districts of South Tyrol. In contrast to the sympathetic public their answers were different: being directly emotionally and economically affected by losses of livestock they displayed a negative attitude towards the wolf.

Nevertheless half of them would make use of preventive protection measures if these were effective. But it is exactly the effectiveness of common solutions, such as protective fencing, which is doubted by livestock farmers. During the personal interviews another point was made that must be considered. Livestock farmers are under the impression that they don’t get enough support and appreciation for the daily challenges they have to deal with from politicians and the broad public, especially the city people. But they feel that they keep traditions alive, which are the basis of tourism in South Tyrol.

Damages caused by the wolf and suggestions for what they see as little-tested counter-measures are the final straw. The opinion of the questioned persons from the tourist sector is not as uniform: half of them fear a negative impact on tourism, while the other half sees the return of the wolf as a chance for a new tourism niche or is completely neutral. Even the tourists themselves had a word in the study. Close to 400 holidaymakers in South Tyrol from Germany, Italy, Austria and Switzerland were questioned. 60% of them were positive-minded towards the wolf and more than half of them showed interest in extracurricular activities in the wolf areas.

The research of the Institute for Regional Development of Eurac Research took place in summer 2018 and is the first scientific contribution to an emotionally heated discussion. What is needed now are educational work and encouragement of the exchange between all interest groups. That and to be open for compromises are the basis for lasting and efficient wildlife management.

The complete study can be downloaded free of charge at:  or:

Translated and summarized here from the original article in German at

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 160

Kai of the Wind

by: Kai

A wolf that was abandoned and left to die alone by his pack after losing his position as Alpha leader. He dragged his body across many mountains and hills, across mossy lands, lakes and rivers till he met the great spirit of life. He asked the great spirit to give him his strength back and to give him one more chance to regain his position as Alpha, the great spirit told him he must perform a task in order to see if he was able to be the rightful leader of the clan, he must help him retrieve a prize that was dearest to the great spirit. Kai accepted the task and was told to go to the top of the mountain to receive the strength he urged for, and was told to kill the new alpha leader.

Kai climbed for three days up the mountain, acquired his strength, and went back to his clan in Woodfalls, to kill the new Alpha leader. When Kai appeared, the wolves stared at him as if to see a ghost, the new Alpha leader, Kou, looked at him and snarled. He attacked Kai, but was no match for him, Kai dodged to the left and jumped up and landed on Kou and ripped his throat out. The rest of the clan looked at Kai and lowered their heads as Kai traveled back to the Great Spirit. He told the Great Spirit that he has done what was wished, but did not find what the Great Spirit wanted. The Great Spirit smirked and looked at Kai and told him you are the prize that I wanted. Kai was lifted to the air and his body shook and felt as if his body was going to turn inside out.

Kai lived, and the Great Spirit saw the element that suited Kai. He told Kai he would now be in control of the wind and was told that only he would be responsible for it. This was such a burden for Kia that he fled. The Great Spirit was angered, so he turned Kai into the wind itself. Kai was then made, and forever will remain as the wind.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

Gosh, time is running so fast I can hardly believe that’s almost Easter again. It feels like I packed away the Christmas tree just a week ago, hehe.

Although we still have good rain (luckily) you can feel winter approaching; the nights are pretty nippy now, but I hope it will stay warm for another good while. With having been sick for so long it feels like summer has been much too short, at least for my taste. In contrast to my opinion the furry pack seems to enjoy the cooler days and especially the cold nights and early mornings with thick fog and high humidity.

Ascar II is a real pest in the moment because Taima has taken to flirting with Kajack II quite often. I have no clue why she is so attracted to him lately, but it’s so cute to watch them. She muzzles and licks him and all over his face and then motivates him to play with her in a very love-sick lady-like manner, something Ascar cannot stand to watch. Although Kajack knows that very well and tries to stay out of Ascar’s way, the fact alone that Taima seems to prefer Kajack’s company more than his is something he cannot stand. Poor Kajack can now hardly move two steps without Ascar being hot on his heels, and if he gets too close to Taima Ascar will immediately demonstrate his dominance by mounting him. That has resulted in Ascar spending more time on Kajack’s back than doing anything else all day long. I really wonder where Kajack takes this amazing patience from to deal with that behaviour with almost no aggression at all. From time to time he growls at Ascar or even snaps at him, but most of the time he just throws him off and moves to a space too small for Ascar to follow. Shame, he is such a handsome and strong boy, physically much stronger than Ascar, but he is such a gentle and calm character that he just won’t even think of showing Ascar how strong he really is. Ted often calls him a sheep. No wonder that Taima loves Kajack’s gentle manner more than Ascar’s bold and hyperactive behaviour. When Kajack doesn’t want to play he will just walk off, but Ascar never accepts No for an answer and will not stop to pester him or Taima until he gets things going his way. He also always tries his luck with Ted and me, pushing, moaning and even climbing over us to get what he wants, but it doesn’t work with us and so he fully concentrates on the one pack member who just gives in to him.

I think that Taima and Kajack make an awesome couple, but for the peace in the house and Kajack’s sake I hope she will give up earlier or later.

Will be continued…

Volume 14, Issue 173, March 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 173, March 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

I do the final readings of every month’s newsletter, and having reached the end of this one, I am fuming once more. What’s new, you may rightfully ask. I won’t even begin to write down what I think of the criminals that dominate the News section, because it would inevitably lead to my using vocabulary unfit for printing. Instead, I urge you to read the news on what is going on in the US, and if you don’t fume as much as I do afterwards, then I don’t know. If you do, and I suppose you will, the least you can do to vent your anger a little is signing every single one of the petitions and protests available.

A stroke of bad luck has hit the Wolf Sanctuary in Reitz, and if you can help them with anything or in any way, please get to it without delay.

We have a wolf tale, as usually, but Erin takes a break, having nothing really important to convey about the pack.

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration here

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From the Sanctuary

The end of February already and this has been a month of disaster and rescues from beginning to end.

This will be the last month that we have Frans’s Ramblings, Frans needs to take a bit of a break; no, we are not losing Frans. Frans has been a rock for HuskyRomi right from when he joined us. Through Frans we reintroduced the newsletter, he did the final read and then sent it out to everyone. He coordinated the adoptions and the sponsorship of the wolves. He organized the Full Moon Festival which is still our most successful fund raiser to date, he introduced us to the world of going to events and selling wolf-related merchandise and we were doing very well while Frans was doing it. We only achieved similar success last year at Mutters Day when the new committee went and put up a strong presence and did well, it took a team of people to do what Frans did.

We have a wonderful committee that is taking HuskyRomi to new heights and this was one of Frans’s suggestions, to separate the sanctuary from the day to day running of HuskyRomi. We in a very short space of time have seen the benefits of this. The wolf trailer which he is donating to us, numerous rescues and some very challenging ones which meant going out day after day and never giving up, so many animals enjoy a good life thanks to Frans and the people he roped in to assist. I could go on because there is so much more.

Our 6m Freezer’s compressor has packed up, R 55,000 to replace the original one so we are going with a compromise one that should do the work, once fitted they discovered that the unit inside was full of micro holes and was leaking gas, this is wear and tear from ammonia gas omitted from the meat when some of it goes off, this set us back R 30,0000. Kim raised the bulk of the money for the compressor overseas and some of the committee members also contributed towards the compressor. The fans are an additional expense, so you are always welcome to contribute towards it, ref. Freezer.

We have been working on a pack of wolves down in Gordons Bay packed into a small garden for well over a year. The man has refused to cooperate with us until recently, soon after three of them attacked his son. We moved heaven and earth to move these wolves and a number of you contributed towards their airfare. We had Stan Kessel down in Cape Town coordinating the transport of the animals from the garden to the airport, flights are booked and everything is running smoothly. We’ve created a new enclosure for them at great cost, he’s contributing nothing, we ask him for vaccination certificates for the animals, nothing, not even an old one, these wolves have never seen an injection. Animals must have current certificates in order to fly and they cannot fly for at least fourteen days after they’ve been vaccinated.

The problem with the wolves is that they are being kept in two packs, one of three and the other one of four in a tiny garden and they are never taken out of the garden. They do not like the man and he’s scared to go to them, Stan didn’t experience anything from them. I believe he beat them for attacking his son. Back to the small garden; animals kept in cages and small runs develop kennel stress, so you can imagine two packs of wolves in a tiny garden; what’s the difference? The enclosure that they will be going into is far bigger than that.

Frans’s Ramblings

Well, what can I say. Here we are already at the end of February of 2019.

I am sitting in front of my computer reading through some of the columns that I have done over the last couple of years and wondering how to say what I intend to say this time round. I started my “ramblings” shortly after we started the newsletter. I used the column to share information about relocations and rescues that we were involved with. I also shared information about some of the things happening at the sanctuary and often just vented a bit about the way some people treated and cared for their animals and what their animals were up to. Sometimes I just shared a snippet or some interesting facts that I came across. I never really received any feedback if the readers liked or enjoyed my ramblings, but nonetheless continued with it most months.

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) the one thing we all can always be sure of, is change. Due to a very radical change in my personal circumstances, I do not see my way open to continue with the column any longer. I will also not be able any more to do the final proof read and distribution of the newsletter and require a new volunteer to contact me as soon as possible that I can explain the procedure and hand the mailing list over. Please contact me by email (caring.wolves@gmail.com) and let me know when it would be convenient to contact you, as I am seldom in a position to answer my phone during the day when it rings.

It is with quite a heavy heart that I have to move on, but I trust that I may be able to get actively involved again in the not too distant future.

Until we may meet again. Keep on howling.

Frans.

P.S. While reading through the insert below about a film, I remembered that I mentioned a film called “Alpha” a while ago. It was on the circuit locally for about a week (only at Hyde Park) and then disappeared. I managed to download a copy online and thoroughly enjoyed it. The good news is that it is now available on DVD and you should be able to source it from wherever you get your DVD’s. As I say, we really enjoyed it and if you enjoy wolves (and other canines) the way I do, you will probably love it as well.

For a detailed review of the movie How to be human: the man who was raised by wolves by Matthew Bremner, see Husky Romi’s February ’19 Newsletter.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (defenders@mail.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Wolves in Montana need your help

Montana’s wolves could once again be in extreme danger.

Anti-wolf extremists are pushing a bill in the Montana legislature that would essentially put a bounty on wolves throughout the state.

If this bill passes, it would be a lethal throwback to the draconian 19th century tactics that led to the extermination of wolves throughout the lower 48 states.

Defenders is on the ground in Montana right now, mobilizing opposition to this and other anti-wildlife bills. And we need you with us. Your emergency donation will help protect Montana wolves and other vulnerable animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=s0M6KrLI2YXVA8WtWHixoQ

The bill, HB 279, would offer ‘expense reimbursement’ to trappers who trap and kill wolves. In the past, similar reward systems for dead wolves nearly drove them to extinction.

We’ve stopped anti-wolf legislation like this before. But to keep up our efforts to protect wolves and vulnerable wildlife, we need your help

The bill also reminds us that wolves are still not safe.

Thanks to the support of wildlife lovers like you, Defenders maintains an involved presence in states like Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho.

The good news is many people in these states support wolf conservation. But the extreme anti-wolf minority remains powerful – and this cruel bill is their attempt to exterminate wolves once and for all.

We won’t abandon wildlife in need. Please give today to help keep us on the frontlines protecting vulnerable animals! http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Csu2RnkN6iNAEMBwGtY1oA

Your urgent donation will support our team of on-the-ground wolf experts, biologists, and wildlife lobbyists – both in wolf country and in Washington DC.

We will never rest until America’s wolves are fully recovered and safe from the threat of extermination.

Thank you in advance for your compassion, commitment, and generosity.

  1. USA: The deadliest place to be a wolf

In Idaho, it costs just $11.50 to kill a wolf.

As if that wasn’t bad enough – some hunters are now actually being paid to kill wolves. In fact, more than 500 of Idaho’s gray wolves have been killed for bounty since they were delisted as part of a coordinated multi-pronged attack by the state and anti-wolf groups.

Right now, these wolves are being killed during the peak of their annual breeding season. Wolves who would be raising new pups by the end of the spring are instead being killed for profit.

The situation is tragic, and I can’t think of a more dangerous place to be a wolf.

You can help protect our wolves today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=A3jrE42ANBAN9d0qVYUOhw

Wolf hatred has always run strong among many in Idaho. But right now, it’s blazing:

  • Since wolf management was turned over to Idaho, hundreds of wolves are killed every year by hunters and trappers.
  • Idaho’s Fish and Game department is proposing to open huge new areas of the state to wolf trapping and snaring. A trapped wolf faces a gruesome death: wounded, starved, or dying of thirst, often for days.
  • Idaho has adopted a new bounty program to pay hunters and trappers for dead wolves. More than 500 wolves have been killed for bounty so far. This is the same tactic that drove wolves to extinction in the West in the 20th century.
  • And the state has recently created a permanent wolf “kill fund,” funded by ranchers, elk hunters and tax dollars. Its goal: To eradicate as many wolves as possible.

These moves will result in hundreds of wolf deaths, if not more.

By going to

you say: << YES, I WANT TO PROTECT WOLVES >>

As a thank-you for your urgent support: Make a gift of $30 or more and we’ll send you a free wolf fleece blanket!

Many hunters and trappers want to end all restrictions on wolf hunting, clearing the way for mass wolf extermination.

This treatment of our wildlife is disgraceful – but with your help, Defenders is fighting back: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=dKdNx0Blyuix0oCkDpwysw

With your support, Defenders is working to protect wolves with coexistence programs in communities across the West. Defenders also uses your donations to fight illegal efforts to kill wolves, to hold states accountable for wolf recovery and to protect wildlife in courts across the country.

These are terrifying times for wolves and the people who love them. We’re asking you to stand with us today to fight for their right to survive in the wild.

Please give today to boost efforts to protect wolves and other vulnerable animals wherever they’re threatened: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=3faG6FqVXvVtaoY3Nd5LSA

Thank you for all you do for wildlife.

  1. USA: The worst-case scenario for America’s wolves

We hoped this day would never come.

The Interior Department is moving forward with a plan to strip gray wolves of all protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

As their latest and most heinous attack on our nation’s wildlife, this is nothing short of a death sentence for countless wolves.

Please donate today and help support our all-out effort to protect gray wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=gSrnfAqa4mQp7rs62qzeqA

We’ve seen what happens when premature delisting leaves wolves to the mercy of anti-wolf politics and politicians that are unwilling to protect them. In Northern Rockies states such as Wyoming and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protections.

If this disastrous plan goes forward, decades of hard-won wolf conservation progress could be destroyed, and the future of gray wolf recovery would once again be in jeopardy. Defenders of Wildlife will do whatever it takes to keep this from happening, but we urgently need your help.

Your urgent donation today will help support our all-out effort to keep gray wolves protected under the ESA: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=-jTbJXWq7PRnc1VTbjJvdQ

It’s not too late to stop this despicable proposal. Defenders is ready to fight back for wolves:

  • We’re engaging a network of thousands of wolf-lovers like you to demand ongoing wolf protections at the first sign of this outrageous proposal moving forward;
  • Our experts are providing key ESA policy and legal analysis, making it clear that delisting is not only premature, it also sets a dangerous precedent for other imperiled animals; and
  • We will take this administration to court to fight this premature delisting of gray wolves.

Wolves are counting on you to stand up for their continued protection, and to speak out against a delisting that could halt or even reverse decades of progress.

Please donate today, while we can still make a difference: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=qxnuq3ttrkyN9aRf-eP5yg

  1. USA: Trump administration announces gray wolf delisting

Today, the Trump administration formally announced their plan to strip gray wolves Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections.

This is a heinous attack on our nation’s wildlife and nothing short of a death sentence for countless wolves.

Please join us in the fight to protect wolves across America!

Donate today and help support our all-out effort to keep gray wolves protected under the ESA: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=bBApIOUlyzfss5TKVFehCg

We hoped this day would never come.

The Interior Department is moving forward with a plan to strip gray wolves of all protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

As their latest and most heinous attack on our nation’s wildlife, this is nothing short of a death sentence for countless wolves.

Please donate today and help support our all-out effort to protect gray wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=VgCcW8rwoeXOgnlSO_7rRw

We’ve seen what happens when premature delisting leaves wolves to the mercy of anti-wolf politics and politicians that are unwilling to protect them. In Northern Rockies states such as Wyoming and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protections.

If this disastrous plan goes forward, decades of hard-won wolf conservation progress could be destroyed, and the future of gray wolf recovery would once again be in jeopardy. Defenders of Wildlife will do whatever it takes to keep this from happening, but we urgently need your help.

Your urgent donation today will help support our all-out effort to keep gray wolves protected under the ESA: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=iSvI6Wwx3upJW4PB8vcNuA

It’s not too late to stop this despicable proposal. Defenders is ready to fight back for wolves:

  • We’re engaging a network of thousands of wolf-lovers like you to demand ongoing wolf protections at the first sign of this outrageous proposal moving forward;
  • Our experts are providing key ESA policy and legal analysis, making it clear that delisting is not only premature, it also sets a dangerous precedent for other imperiled animals; and
  • We will take this administration to court to fight this premature delisting of gray wolves.

Wolves are counting on you to stand up for their continued protection, and to speak out against a delisting that could halt or even reverse decades of progress.

Please donate today, while we can still make a difference: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=13O2Qvvke8qTGGL5wuaxyg

 

From Change.org, Salty Dog via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

1. USA: Trump Administration proposes stripping Wolf Protection across Nation

Today, acting Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced a proposal to strip federal Endangered Species Act protections for wolves across nearly the entire lower-48 states, reversing gray wolf recovery in the United States.

You can read the full article at http://earthjustice.org

From Change.org, Heather L. via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

USA Congress Spares Mexican Gray Wolves! At Least for Now…

I am happy to report that no anti-lobo legislation was passed into law during 2018. Thank you to everyone who fought against the anti-wolf legislation – this victory would not have been possible without your help! While we celebrate this victory, we should keep in mind that Congress might try to delist Mexican Gray Wolves again in the future, so we must keep an eye on them and ensure that they do not get away with this!

 

From Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

  1. USA: Add your name to tell Senator Tammy Baldwin: No more attacks on wolves and the Endangered Species Act

The Endangered Species Act is our nation’s most effective tool for protecting wildlife from extinction. It has saved some of our most iconic species from disappearing forever. The law works – but it only works if politicians let it.

Tell Senator Tammy Baldwin to end her repeated attempts to weaken the Endangered Species Act and legislatively delist gray wolves here

Wisconsin’s junior Senator Tammy Baldwin has repeatedly introduced legislation that would do an end run around the Endangered Species Act and ignore scientists and biologists by kicking gray wolves off of the endangered species list.

Most recently, she cosponsored an anti-wolf amendment to the Natural Resources Management Act–an important law that will protect public lands and reauthorize important conservation programs. The amendment that she cosponsored would remove Endangered Species Act protections from gray wolves in the Great Lakes. Thankfully that effort failed. But, she has introduced or cosponsored similar legislation or amendments that would delist wolves on multiple previous occasions.

Sign the petition to tell Wisconsin Senator Baldwin: No more anti-wolf, anti-Endangered Species Act riders or legislation here

Legislatively removing protections from gray wolves puts their continued recovery in real jeopardy. Without these protections, states are free to set hunting and trapping seasons on wolves. We know from past experience that Wisconsin aggressively manages wolves and have every indication that the state would do so again.

The damage extends to the Endangered Species Act itself. By allowing politicians to replace scientists in decisions around endangered species protections, Senator Baldwin is giving a green light to future politically-based assaults. Would she support slashing protections for other endangered species that big industry finds inconvenient? If not, she should not be attempting repeated rewrites of the rules for gray wolves. Please add your name to tell Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin to protect wolves and the Endangered Species Act by ending her attempts to legislatively delist our gray wolves here

Thank you for your commitment to Wisconsin’s wildlife and wild places.

  1. Wolves from coast-to-coast could lose Endangered Species Act protections

Every wolf in the continental U.S. is on the verge of losing crucial protections under a reckless proposal announced by Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt this week.

Please make an emergency gift to help fight the Trump Administration’s national wolf delisting here

Hunting, trapping, and habitat loss drove gray wolves from their rightful homes just decades ago and pushed them to the very brink of extinction. Thanks to the Endangered Species Act, wolves have begun to come back – but that recovery has only just begun. Gray wolves occupy a mere five percent of their historic range and barely more than a third of the suitable habitat.

If the Trump Administration succeeds, wolves from coast-to-coast could be faced with indiscriminate, deadly traps and trophy hunters’ bullets. In Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, where wolves have already lost Endangered Species Act protections, nearly 3,500 wolves have been killed just since 2011.

I need your help to fight this gutting of protection here

Gray wolves that have just begun to come back in Oregon and Washington could lose the protections that have brought them this far. Wolves in the Great Lake states that are just getting their foothold, could be subject to aggressive management by state agencies intent on favoring hunting and trapping over conservation.

Wolves everywhere could face terrible new threats, breaking up their packs and ending their historic comeback.

Walking away from its responsibility to protect these wolves is a betrayal of conservation and the spirit of the Endangered Species Act. We will fight this disgusting plan with every resource we have. Our field organizers around the country are already working tirelessly to organize and mobilize opposition–but I need your support. Please make a contribution today to keep the Endangered Species Coalition in this long, arduous fight to keep wolves protected until they are truly, fully recovered – and not a minute sooner

Thank you for your commitment to wildlife and wild places.

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. Feds Seek to Strip Protection for Gray Wolves Nationwide

Yesterday, Acting Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) will soon propose a rule to remove federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for gray wolves in the lower 48 states.

Wolves once ranged across most of North America, a vital part of many varied ecosystems. But an unremitting slaughter by humans brought wolves to the brink of extinction. By the 1960s, government-sponsored extermination had wiped out nearly all wolves in the Lower 48 states. Only a small population of gray wolves remained in extreme north-eastern Minnesota and on Isle Royale.

The Endangered Species Act, signed into law in 1973, gave us a second chance to right this wrong.

With ESA protections and the support of the American public, the gray wolf was able to return to limited portions of its native range. In areas where wolves began to recover, like the northern Rocky Mountain states and western Great Lakes states, scientists have noted more diverse plant and wildlife thriving where they had been suppressed for decades.

By stripping federal protections from nearly all gray wolves nationwide, wolves in historically occupied areas like the southern Rockies and Northeast may never be able to establish viable populations despite suitable habitat and availability of prey.

Losing federal ESA protections would also have deadly implications for wolves: in just the last few years, thousands of wolves have been shot or trapped in states where protections were temporarily or permanently lifted.

This isn’t the first attempt by USFWS to strip gray wolves of federal protection. The Obama administration had also proposed removing the wolves’ endangered status in 2013, but the effort was unsuccessful. In the Independent Peer Review of the 2013 delisting rule, the five-member panel of scientists agreed unanimously that USFWS’s proposal was based on insufficient science.

USFWS intends to publish the proposed rule in the Federal Register in the coming days, opening a public comment period on the proposal. This proposal will exclude Mexican gray wolves, which would remain a listed subspecies under the ESA.

Stay tuned for updates and ways to take action.

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE January 1-31 2019

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Recovery Program

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website www.atfws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

Due to the Federal government shutdown that lasted from December 22, 2018 until January 28, 2019, the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update for December did not include any project information for the State of New Mexico. The January Monthly Update will include project information from New Mexico for December and January. The shutdown also resulted in a delay of the annual helicopter count and capture operation by 18 days, however; the count will be conducted in February within the appropriate timeframe.

During the month of December, USFWS met with the San Carlos Apache Tribe, White Mountain Apache Tribe, and Zuni Departments of Game and Fish.

The captive reared Mexican wolf that escaped from a wildlife center in Divide, Colorado, on Nov 11, 2018, was captured near the center on December 12, 2018 and is being held for veterinary care at the Rio Grande Zoo in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable. Year-end population counts for 2018 continued during the month of January.

At the end of January, there were 25 packs (11 in AZ and 14 in NM) and seven single collared wolves. There were 76 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wild wolves are collared. Studbook numbers following individual pack names below denote wolves with functioning radio collars.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and f1683)

In January, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In January, the IFT continued to document M1477 travelling with an uncollared wolf in a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697)

In January, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)

In January, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Hoodoo m1677 was documented making dispersal movements in New Mexico and the central portion of the ASNF.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, fp1794, and fp1825)

In January, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)

In January, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, and fp1792)

In January, the Saffel Pack was located within their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In January, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In January, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In January, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared AM1382

In January, the IFT documented AM1382, of the Panther Creek Pack, travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1686

In January, the IFT documented yearling f1686 continued to make dispersal movements within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In January, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)

In January, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559, AF1283, and f1674)

In January, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory and occasionally documented north of their territory on the FAIR.

Single collared F1679

In January, F1679 of the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR. F1679 was occasionally documented on the SCAR.

Single collared M1824

In January, M1824 was documented travelling in the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (F1444)

During December and January, F1444, the only wolf with a functioning collar in the Copper Creek Pack, was documented making wide dispersal movements outside the pack’s traditional range.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354 and AF1456)

During December and January, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Datil Mountain Pack (collared F1685)

During December, the Datil Mountain Pack travelled within their traditional territory.  In January, the Datil Mountain Pack male, M1453, was confirmed dead. The incident is currently under investigation. F1685 continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and fp1702)

During December and January, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.

Hawks Nest Pack

During early December F1473 travelled within their traditional territory.  In late December, the Hawks Nest Pack female, F1473, was confirmed dead. The incident is currently under investigation. With the death of F1473 and the death of AM1038 in November, the Hawks Nest pack is considered defunct and will not be reported on in future updates.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, M1556, f1670, m1821, fp1721, and mp1710)

During December and January, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. M1556 was captured by a private trapper, processed and released.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285 and AF1405)

During December and January, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During December and January, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and f1684)

During December and January, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. Sub-adult female, f1684, continued to travel in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and f1705)

During December and January, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, m1678, and mp1827)

During December and January, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. In December, the IFT was notified that two wolves were potentially travelling with traps from a private trapper on their feet. A helicopter capture was immediately initiated and F1565 and m1669 were captured.  F1565 and m1669 were placed under veterinary care. Unfortunately, F1565 died the first night under veterinary care. This case is under investigation. Male 1669 was transferred to the Rio Grande Zoo Veterinary Clinic for continued care, but the injuries sustained required the amputation of the leg. On January 23, M1669 was moved to Sevilleta Wolf Management Facility. The IFT has also documented m1678 travelling with the SBP pack in December and January. The IFT established a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock in January.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399, f1578, and fp1822)

During December and January, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  Collared female f1578 has been traveling with single m1824 in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During December and January, AF1553was confirmed travelling with Prieto m1678 in the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788 and M1349)

During December and January, the Squirrel Springs pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT responded to a male wolf caught by a private trapper in December within the Squirrel Springs territory. The IFT confirmed the wolf was M1349, a formerly missing wolf from 2014, and successfully collared and released the wolf. M1349 is now considered a member of the Squirrel Springs pack.

Single collared M1673

During December and January, M1673 was not located.

MORTALITIES

During the month of December, the following wolves in New Mexico were confirmed mortalities: F1565 of the Prieto Pack and F1473 of the Hawks Nest Pack.  Both incidents are under investigation by USFWS Law Enforcement.

During the month of January, M1453 of the Datil Mountain Pack was located dead in New Mexico; the incident is under investigation.

From January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018, there were a total of 21 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of December 2018, there were two confirmed depredation incidents on livestock.  In January 2019, there were 18 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock.  There was one nuisance incident in January.

From January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2018 there were a total of 68 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 31 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On December 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On December 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 14, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 24, the IFT took a report of an elk calf killed by wolves near a residence in Nutrioso, AZ. The reporting party saw two uncollared wolves on the elk carcass. The animals ran off when the reporting party drove a vehicle toward them. The IFT removed the carcass from the property to eliminate further attractant to wolves.

On January 27, Wildlife Services investigated separately a dead cow and a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined both were confirmed wolf kills.

On January 28, Wildlife Services conducted six investigations: three dead cows and three dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined four were confirmed wolf kills, one calf was a coyote kill and one died of unknown causes.

On January 30, Wildlife Services investigated separately five dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined all five calves were confirmed wolf kills.

On January 31, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf and an injured cow in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation concluded the calf was a probable dog kill and the injuries caused to the cow were confirmed to have been caused by dogs.

On January 31, Wildlife Services investigated separately two dead cows and a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigations determined all three were confirmed wolf kills.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On January 8, WMAT presented an update on KNNB radio in Whiteriver, AZ.

In January, WMAT provided an article on the WMAT Mexican Wolf Tribal Youth Conservation Program in the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society newsletter.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

From Take Action! at GreaterGood Network (news@greatergood.com)

USA: Defend The Endangered Species Act

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) plays a crucial role in conserving national park wildlife. Currently supporting over 500 plant and animal species with habitat in our national parks, thus far it has helped save more than 99 percent of those listed. We have the ESA to thank for the bald eagle and Channel Island fox, to name just a few.

Rather than continuing this important preservation work, Congress has instead introduced dozens of bills and amendments that would turn this bedrock legislation into the ‘eliminating species act.’

This is a direct threat to the long-term conservation of iconic American wildlife and wild lands. Sign our petition to today to ensure that even our national parks’ most vulnerable species remain protected!

Take Action here

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in the USA

The biggest threat to Wolves in decades

U.S. wildlife officials plan to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, re-igniting the legal battle over a predator that’s run into conflicts with farmers and ranchers after rebounding in some regions, an official told The Associated Press.

Acting Interior Secretary David Bernhardt announced the proposal during a Wednesday speech at the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference in Denver, a weeklong conservation forum for researchers, government officials and others, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Spokesman Gavin Shire said in an interview with the AP.

The decision was based on gray wolves successfully recovering from widespread extermination last century, Shire said. Further details were expected during a formal announcement planned in coming days.

Wildlife advocates reacted with outrage and promised to challenge in court any attempt to lift protections. Agriculture groups and lawmakers from Western states are likely to support the administration’s proposal.

Long despised by farmers and ranchers, wolves were shot, trapped and poisoned out of existence in most of the U.S. by the mid-20th century.

They received endangered species protections in 1975, when there were about 1,000 left, only in northern Minnesota. Now more than 5,000 of the animals live in the contiguous U.S.

Most are in the Western Great Lakes and Northern Rockies regions. Protections for the Northern Rockies population were lifted in 2011 and hundreds of wolves are killed annually by hunters in Wyoming, Idaho and Montana.

State officials and government biologists have said wolves continue to thrive despite pressure from hunting. The animals are prolific breeders and can adapt to a variety of habitats.

But wildlife advocates have fought to keep federal protections kept in place until wolves repopulate more of their historic range that stretched across most of North America.

Since being reintroduced in Yellowstone National park and central Idaho in the mid-1990s, the Northern Rockies population has expanded to parts of Oregon, Washington and California.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has argued for years that gray wolves have recovered in the lower 48 states, despite experts who contend they occupy about 15 percent of the territory they once roamed. Agency officials insist that recovery of wolves everywhere is not required for the species no longer to be in danger of extinction.

John Vucetich, a wildlife biologist at Michigan Technological University, said most wolf experts probably would agree the species is not at imminent risk, but he said he considers dropping federal protections as a premature move.

He said he could not pinpoint a threshold at which he would consider the wolves to be recovered but that “it’s nowhere near as small as 15 percent” of the far-flung regions where they once lived.

Many people “still find it difficult to live with wolves,” primarily because they kill livestock as well as deer and elk that people like to hunt, Vucetich said. If wolves are returned to state management, he said, “I do worry that some of the states could be overly aggressive and that wolves could fare worse than their current condition.”

The government first proposed revoking the wolf’s protected status across the Lower 48 states in 2013, but backed off after federal courts struck down its plan for “delisting” the species in the western Great Lakes region states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

Fish and Wildlife Service officials disclosed to the AP  (https://www.apnews.com/0a9027ff419a4b3d9b547968e6042c32) last year that another scientific review of the animal’s status had been launched.

Shire declined to disclose the agency’s rationale for determining the species had recovered, but said members of the public would have a chance to comment before a final decision in coming months.

“Recovery of the gray wolf under the Endangered Species Act is one of our nation’s great conservation successes, with the wolf joining other cherished species, such as the bald eagle, that have been brought back from the brink,” Shire later added in an emailed statement.

Jamie Clark, a former director of the Fish and Wildlife Service now with the Defenders of Wildlife group, said endangered species protections were need to prevent “an all-out war on wolves” in states that would allow hunting.

“We don’t have any confidence that wolves will be managed like other wildlife,” she said. “We’re going to fight this I any way possible.”

Lawmakers in Congress frustrated with court rulings maintaining protections for wolves have backed legislation to forcibly strip protections in the Great Lakes region and beyond. A similar effort by lawmakers succeeded in 2011 for Northern Rockies wolves.

Original article at

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 159

Once in a Blue Moon by Jessica Bruce

A sharp breeze rustles through the open field. Numbness grips the weary bones of an ancient soul. Between the heavy swoosh of open air and the cracking of a forgotten soul’s heart, it’s as if the two were symbolic. Each had an untimely connection with each other. The cold wind each year would sweep the lands and take all life in its pass, followed by its brother the frost without thought or forgiveness. The frost kills life and so has robbed his spirit.

He knew his time would come. He knew there would be a time when it would be useless to carry on any longer.

“I’m old”, He said out loud.

But had he known that his kin, his own flesh and blood would a banded him for being the weak and slowing down the hunts, maybe one would have planned better. Maybe, one would have focused more on its surroundings and realized that the prey had moved on and there is simply nothing left in the barren lands.

A heavy wheeze escapes his nostrils in short breaths. He could see the mist from his breath. Gazing down his body, while laying on the ground, his once amber fur has turned a sleek gray with just a few strands of light brown left. His fur, now a matted jungle of dirt and leaves. Lifting his weary paw to scratch his side, he could feel the thick ribs sticking out of his body. His once powerful hind legs that used to pump him through the woods at high speed were nothing more than two frail sticks.

Pulling, himself up off the frosty ground, he began to stare at the deep blue sky and golden stars and started to remember a time when life was good and gracious. He had a name and rank. He knew there was a time when he was highly respected by all his fellow wolves for he was the Alpha. He had a family then. He had an identity.

There was a time when he thought his name meant respect among his pack. His name once was Shadow Fang. A name now that has been forgotten.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

Nothing major to report this month, but…

Will be continued…

Volume 14, Issue 172, February 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 172, February 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

When the Horror Clown was made King of America, one of my first thoughts was what he might have in mind for the wildlife of his realm – and the result of this contemplation was frightening. Now my nightmares are turned into reality, as you can read in the International News section…

We are happy to reprint another instalment of Rick Lamplugh’s sharp insights into the historic conflict of man vs. wolf here. If you are not yet following his blog – it is absolutely worth it…

As usual, we have wolf tale, and Erin updates us on her pack, this time calling on all readers to come forward if they have any useful calming strategy for canines during thunderstorms. And if you wonder how I felt after having been (indirectly) struck by lightning in the bath tub – it is something I just cannot recommend…

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs: http

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE: https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=2971075dd4&e=c4f881378d

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From Gary

I find it hard to believe that in the flick of a wolf’s tail we are already at the end of January with only eleven short months to go until we get to 2020, wow! Someone said to me many years ago when I was a child waiting for the excitement of Christmas and wishing that the days would stop dragging so, that I should not wish my life away because as we get older the years start to fly by at a faster and faster pace. Good grief, they were right on the button as the days now seem to go by like a charging elephant.

The good news is that we have very few (a handful) of calendars left. Well done to all those who made great work of selling them. If you have not managed to get hold of one yet or need another for someone special, please get hold of me but be quick as they are becoming as scarce as rocking horse droppings.

I have not been down to the Sanctuary since last year and Glenda and I are experiencing serious withdrawal symptoms and cannot wait to see the new additions, both animals and structures. Also, cannot wait to see how our special youngsters, Cheyenne and Cherokee have grown and matured.

I am also putting out an appeal to all those who would like to assist with the fund-raising efforts. Glenda and I both have full time jobs, and this takes up almost all of our time, we have also just taken on a new and very exciting agency which takes a great deal of time and nurturing, which means we do not have as much time as last year to devote to the Sanctuary. So please if you feel the calling to become involved in helping the animals and the Sanctuary evolve, please let us know as we do need extra hands this year.

Don’t forget to send Larry any news that may interest wolf people like us. Until then keep on howling and try to do it at least once in the Sanctuary, they all want to see you.

From the sanctuary

Well, the first month of 2019 has come and gone already, happened so fast I hardly had any time to enjoy it.

Volunteering

We had our first official volunteer, Kayla Smit who spent ten days here, she did a bit of everything from petting the animals, helping Yvonne with the cabin to brushing the wolves down at the house, even interacted nicely with the visitors and answering a lot of their questions during the tours, which helped me a lot with a large group.

Lightening / Storms

One of our concerns is the intensity of the storms that have been hitting us. Not only out here but elsewhere people and animals have been struck by lightning, not sure what to put this down to. We lost two animals, one was Damon, a youngster who was near and dear to me, and old Maya who had fought so well only for us to lose her to a strike that was too close and also left her old brother a bit shaken.

Durban Wolf Rescue

Went down to Durban to rescue two wolves. The owner was forced to sell his house and couldn’t take them with; Blackie, the young male, has never had any human interaction since he was born. Gillet (a Nordic name, which is where Gillian comes from) is an absolute sweetheart. As much as I like to be the hero, the real hero was Renata, a friend of mine down in Natal (she brought Marco to me) who worked really hard to capture Blackie. She got bitten five times in the process but never gave up.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (defenders@mail.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Trump to America’s wolves: Drop dead

When the federal government turns its back on wolves, wolves die.

That’s the simple heartbreaking truth. And it’s why the Trump administration’s imminent plan to strip gray wolves of all protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is nothing short of a death sentence for countless wolves.

Please donate today and help support our all-out effort to protect gray wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=qo7iMDp8lTs2tPipQOadSw

If this disastrous plan goes forward, decades of hard-won wolf conservation progress could be destroyed, and the future of gray wolf recovery would once again be in doubt. Defenders of Wildlife will do whatever it takes to keep this from happening, but we urgently need your help.

Your support will keep us on the frontline for vulnerable animals – please help out today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=H5RkKuTyyqm_yi_BQplUhw

We’ve seen what happens when premature delisting leaves wolves to the mercy of anti-wolf politics and politicians that are unwilling to protect them. In Wyoming and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protections.

And we continue to see some of Yellowstone National Park’s most iconic and beloved wolves shot and killed just across the park border.

Your urgent donation today will help support our all-out effort to keep gray wolves protected under the ESA: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=0MU5TAkC9tlXEBMMI_qO1w

It’s not too late to stop this reckless and cruel proposal. Defenders is ready to fight back for wolves:

  • We’re engaging a network of thousands of wolf-lovers like you to demand ongoing wolf protections at the first sign of this outrageous proposal moving forward;
  • Our experts are providing key ESA policy and legal analysis, making it clear that delisting is not only premature, it also sets a dangerous precedent for other imperiled animals; and
  • We stand ready to fight this administration in court if necessary to challenge any premature delisting of gray wolves.
  1. USA: Montana: A reward for killing wolves?

Montana’s wolves could once again be in extreme danger.

Anti-wolf extremists are pushing a bill in the Montana legislature that would essentially put a bounty on wolves throughout the state.

If this bill passes, it would be a lethal throwback to the draconian 19th-century tactics that led to the extermination of wolves throughout the lower 48 states.

Defenders is on the ground in Montana right now, mobilizing opposition to this and other anti-wildlife bills. And we need you with us.

Your emergency donation of $10 or more will help protect Montana wolves and other vulnerable animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=VVZ-OLiNcON5fVvjrV8N0Q

The bill, HB 279, would offer ‘expense reimbursement’ to trappers who trap and kill wolves. In the past, similar reward systems for dead wolves nearly drove them to extinction.

We’ve stopped anti-wolf legislation like this before. But to keep up our efforts to protect wolves and vulnerable wildlife, we need your help here

The bill also reminds us that wolves are still not safe.

Thanks to the support of wildlife lovers like you, Defenders maintains an involved presence in states like Montana, Wyoming, and Idaho.

The good news is many people in these states support wolf conservation. But the extreme anti-wolf minority remains powerful – and this cruel bill is their attempt to exterminate wolves once and for all.

We won’t abandon wildlife in need. Please give $10 or more today to help keep us on the frontlines protecting vulnerable animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=_HjdZD3g13159cs81tl7Xg

Your urgent donation will support our team of on-the-ground wolf experts, biologists, and wildlife lobbyists – both in wolf country and in Washington DC.

We will never rest until America’s wolves are fully recovered and safe from the threat of extermination.

Thank you in advance for your compassion, commitment, and generosity.

  1. USA: New Mexico: One wolf dead and another maimed

Another tragedy strikes Mexican Grey wolves.

We just learned that four wolves were found caught in traps.

It’s hard to know how long they were trapped there, struggling to escape, dying of thirst or hunger or exposure. And it’s heartbreaking to think how many more wolves could suffer this same fate if we don’t put a stop to this.

Won’t you please donate $10 or more to help us respond to this latest tragedy, to fight for wolves and other imperiled animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=ummE6k7rXpXASRFSANpI3A

One wolf, a female – possibly a mom – died after she was removed from the trap. Another, a young male, had his leg so severely injured it had to be amputated. Yet another had two legs caught in two separate traps. The few remaining Mexican Grey wolves in America cannot survive this kind of devastation.

For me, this is personal. I was present on that morning in 1998 when the first captive-bred Mexican Greys were released. You couldn’t watch them go free without tears in your eyes.

We were so optimistic then. And now leg hold traps, snares and poisons are scattered across the New Mexico landscape.

Help us fight for these wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=W9Dq2Zzaa6KvBUfrCIU_eQ

The fight to restore Mexican Grey wolves to the wild has been a long and at times bitter one. With their numbers in the wild hovering just above 100, lobos remain one of the most endangered mammals in North America and federal agencies have all but abandoned their recovery.

The loss of even one of these critically endangered wolves is heartbreaking, but it’s not too late.

$10 or more help provides the resources we need to meet these challenges everywhere they arise: In the field, in court, and in Washington, D.C.: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=jFks8wJNaItxQOT9d0CzYA

With your help, Defenders is on the ground in Arizona and New Mexico working at the state level, pushing for better wildlife policies in Washington D.C. and advocating to protect these animals in court. We will never stop fighting for wolves and so many other imperiled animals whose futures are in jeopardy.

Thank you in advance for your compassion and generosity.

From Change.org, Jan Olsson via Change.org (change@e.change.org), summarized and translated here from German)

1. Germany: Two Wolves will be shot by order of two Ministers of Environmental Affairs! Prepare for Action!

Two wolves, GW924m from Schleswig-Holstein and GW717m from Lower Saxony, will be shot and killed soon. The fate of the first-mentioned wolf was already determined on 31 January 2019 by the Minister of Environmental Affairs Jan Philipp Albrecht (Die Grünen), the shooting of the second wolf was ordered by the Minister for Environmental Affairs Olaf Lies (SPD).

This cannot be! It is a violation of the European and German Laws!

Beginning next week we will launch a number of measures and actions, so be ready! We must act against these shootings in unison!

We will keep you informed about further details and how you can participate. You can find background information about the planned shooting of the Schleswig-Holstein wolf at: https://www.w-i-s-z-v.de/

Everything for the Wolves!

From Change.org, Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, summarized and translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook

2. Germany: Please sign this Petition for the Rodewald pack!

Presently we try with all our power to save the lives of wolf Dani and the Rodewald pack. Not everybody can be active on site, but by signing the petition everybody can make a contribution to make politicians understand that the majority of the public does not agree with lobbyist despotism.

We think that the shooting of the Rodewald wolf or even the whole pack is politically motivated: therefore, please support this petition launched by a Lower Saxony wolf friend here

From Endangered Species Coalition Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

  1. USA: The Trump Extinction Plan

The Trump Administration has unleashed chaos and destruction at the Department of the Interior from the president’s first days in office. One of his administration’s first moves was to roll back a ban on shooting with lead ammunition in wildlife refuges–a rule put into place to prevent lead poisoning that puts bald eagles and other species at grave risk.

Since then, they have gone on to allow brutal killing of hibernating bears and denning wolf pups, starved critically endangered red wolves of needed recovery efforts, allowed the importation of elephant and big cat “trophies,” and moved to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and other wild places to oil and gas drilling.

Now they are coming for the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Fight back against the Trump Administration’s attack on the Endangered Species Act and keep it working to stop extinction with your online gift today here

The administration proposed a series of sweeping changes to the way they protect endangered species last year. Activists like you submitted hundreds of thousands of comments opposing this plan, and scientists spoke out against it, but the Trump Administration is pushing their extinction plan full speed ahead.

The Trump Extinction Plan will slash protections for species designated as threatened–potentially allowing them to be subject to hunting and trapping seasons.

The Trump Extinction Plan may allow policy makers to deny protections for vanishing plants, fish, and animals if industry lobbyists perceive an economic cost.

The Trump Extinction Plan will make it much harder to protect imperiled species from climate change.

The Trump Extinction Plan will make protecting habitat much more burdensome despite habitat loss being a leading cause of extinction.

It is the gravest threat to the Endangered Species Act in decades. Even after the administration puts their changes in place, we absolutely must and will continue to push back until the very last day of Trump’s term. We can’t let the next president leave these cuts to conservation in place.

Add your opposition to these attacks with your donation today. Your gift will allow us to continue to publicly hammer away at these rollbacks and to keep them front and center here

Thank you for your commitment to wildlife and wild places.

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

A Brief History of Wolves and Humans, Part 2 of 3

by Rick Lamplugh

Any partnership hunters and gatherers may have had with wolves soured after our ancestors became herders. Once we owned land and raised livestock, we came to hate wolves and treat them as unwanted competitors. Our history degenerated from a tale of two species partnering to a sad story of one species with a powerful arsenal—and few thoughts of long-term consequences—waging war on another.

To understand this war, let’s use the Middle Ages (5th-15th century) as a starting point. That was a time when horrifying rumors—some true—about rabid wolves killing humans spread across Europe. Governments declared war on wolves. In France in the 800s, the government hired an elite corps of hunters to control the wolf population. In England in the late 1200s, King Edward ordered the extermination of wolves in some parts of the country. In 1427, James of Scotland passed a law requiring three wolf hunts a year, even during denning season.

Those European wolf wars were not waged in a vacuum; Europeans were struggling with numerous deadly challenges. A Little Ice Age chilled Europe, and some experts believe it began as early as the 1300s and lasted until the mid 1800s. During that Little Ice Age, temperatures fell, snowfall increased, and the growing season shrank. This reduced harvests and created painful shortages of crops and livestock.

Also during the early 1300s, and perhaps due to the Little Ice Age, the Great Famine struck, killing 10 to 25 percent of the population of many European cities and towns.

To make matters worse, in the mid 1300s, the Black Death peaked. That plague eventually killed at least a third of all western Europeans.

With families and friends starving and dying, few would accept wolves taking livestock. I can imagine the war cry spreading across the countryside: Protect our families! Protect our livestock! Kill all wolves!

Once the Black Death subsided, western Europe’s population rebounded and doubled by the early 1600s. According to Jon T. Coleman, author of Vicious: Wolves and Men in America, more Europeans meant more mouths to feed. More food meant more land for livestock and crops. And less open land for wolves.

As Europe’s population grew and spread, wolves had to go. By the early 1500s, wolves had been hunted and trapped to extinction in England. They were eradicated from Scotland by the late 1600s and from Ireland by the late 1700s.

Wolf Hatred Sails to the New World

Increased European population also increased colonization of North America. When colonists disembarked in the New World, wolves probably watched from the woods; an estimated two million roamed most of North America, though colonists rarely saw them since wolves avoided humans. Nevertheless, another war on wolves was about to erupt.

The New World siege started quickly. By 1625, colonists were using tactics refined in the Old World to stop predation, according to Barry Lopez in Of Wolves and Men. They also had firearms and could kill from a distance. They hired wolf hunters and passed bounty laws—the first in Massachusetts in 1630. Other colonies followed including New Jersey in 1697.

Wolf Hatred American Style

The often told story says Old World wolf hatred begat New World wolf hatred. Even though most colonists had never lost livestock to wolves, had never seen or heard wolves, they stepped off the boats hating the predators.

But historian Coleman argues that these immigrants and their descendants—our ancestors—added an American twist to wolf hatred. Given the colonists’ Old World view of wolves as monsters, you would expect New World settlers to have avoided wolves. Yet Coleman discovered records from as early as 1621 that show just the opposite. A settler, in one example, stumbled upon wolves at a deer kill, chased the wolves away, and swiped the meat. Records also document colonists encountering wolves and the frightened animals turning tail.

If wolves were such cowards, why did colonists treat them so viciously? Religion was partly to blame, says Coleman. “The biblical version of wolves with its focus on greed, corruption, and theft flourished in New England…” Colonists thumped the Bible to rationalize wreaking havoc on wolves for the crime of killing livestock.

Yet settlers aided and abetted the predators’ crimes by grazing livestock in wolf country without proper supervision. Coleman found colonists entrusted their herds to teenage boys “short in stature and attention span.” Wolves—hungry and struggling because settlers had overhunted their natural prey—took some livestock. This scenario moved west with civilization: Everywhere settlers killed off wild game and brought in livestock, wolves came to dine. Settlers fought back. But they didn’t just kill wolves; they ravaged them, Coleman says, because Euro-Americans fantasized…”to overpower savagery one must lash out savagely.”

Lashing out included creating fantasies that were the opposite of reality. Colonists portrayed wolves preying on humans. Reality: humans preyed on wolves. Colonists described howling wolves surrounding humans and inducing panic. Reality: humans surrounded and panicked wolves. This belief in a savage wolf—a figment in minds fed with fantasies—prompted vicious eradication of wolves. By 1840 wolves were extinct in Massachusetts and vanishing elsewhere.

Wolves didn’t fight back. Their natural intelligence, speed, strength, and teeth were no match for our big brains and big arsenals. By the mid 1800s, that arsenal included more effective rifles and strychnine. By poisoning a carcass, hunters could kill an entire pack.

Wolf Hatred in Literature

But eliminating wolves wasn’t enough. Even as these essential predators vanished from the countryside, we kept wolves alive, feared, and hated in literature, especially in children’s stories.

Take Grimm’s Fairy Tales, for example. Though wolves were almost eradicated in Germany by 1812 when that book was published, it contained “Little Red Riding Hood,” with its infamous wolf.

Around the same time—on a continent almost devoid of wolves—Europeans resurrected two thousand-year-old Aesop’s Fables. Those stories contained “The Boy Who Cried Wolf,” with its wolf destroying the flock of a lying boy, and “The Dog and the Wolf,” with its wolf refusing to give up its freedom to become a collared, well-fed pet.

In 1886—more than three hundred years after the wolf was eradicated in England—“The Three Little Pigs” was published in The Nursery Rhymes of England. In that tale, a wolf with an insatiable appetite manages to eat two of the pigs before the third kills and eats him.

Stories such as these taught new generations to fear and hate wolves that didn’t even exist.

Stopping the War

The real danger for wolves today lies in this anti-wolf propaganda and hatred that sailed from the Old World to the New, underwent an American twist, and became imbedded in our culture.

This propaganda was institutionalized in the early 1900s by the U.S. Biological Survey—our government’s first wolf-killers. That agency and their prodigy, Wildlife Services—today’s secretive and out-of-control wolf killers—almost cleared the Lower 48 of wolves. Thanks to the Endangered Species Act, wolves have made a comeback. But even after seventy years with few wolves in the Lower 48, the propaganda, the lies, and the fantasies survived and today breed intolerance of wolves and spawn vicious anti-wolf acts.

Wolves suffer most where they are no longer federally protected, where states have the final word.  In states with powerful livestock industries, “wolf management” is a vow to kill all wolves except the minimum number required by a state’s federally approved wolf plan. Plans like those do nothing to reduce wolf hatred or wind down the war on wolves. Worse yet, they give the false impression that wolf survival is just a biological issue, a matter of the number of surviving breeding pairs.

Looking only at numbers obscures the truth: To protect wolves, we must transform our nation’s culture from one that wages war on wolves to one that respects wolves. Wolf hatred was centuries in the making and will not succumb to reason quickly. Until then, wolves need federal protection from hunting and trapping. Wolves need a national wolf recovery plan.

(based on a chapter for In the Temple of Wolves.)

You can find more of Rick’s blog here: https://ricklamplugh.blogspot.com/

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 158

Kia – A Wolf’s Love for a Leopard

Thousands upon thousands of years ago a legend was told by the too great clans, this is the legend known for of Kai and Midnight’s eve.

Many say that wolves travel in there pack and many say that animals should stay with their own kin….but this wolf is different for he does not care much what other wolves do or what the other animals think…for he loves a Leopard and that is normally forbidden for animals to love other animals like that. He travels alone searching for peace and his lost love but every time he gets closer, she gets further. He encounters many dangers on his quest and many friends, but doesn’t stay long to make himself rememberable.

One day, he goes out and crosses paths with another wolf and they stare each other down…the other wolf is part of the Kodaspring clan, his name is Kido, a strong and wise alpha leader that was on a way home from hunting and thought that Kai was going to steal his far share of the catch for himself, so he was ready and in defense mode. Kai did not like the idea that they were going to fight so he turned his back and walked away. Kido was confused by now and thought he was retreating to get his clan, so he attacked Kai. He tore at his side and scratched his right eye, making it a deep wound and blood of chunks flying everywhere. Kai stood up and still walked away, searching for his loved one, no time to waist was all he was thinking. Kido saw that he did not want to fight and figured he was no threat so picked he fare and left. Kai continued into the thick, foggy, forest until he came across an open field of hard, rocky ice land, for he was leaving the land he knew his whole life and would probably never return to Woodfall ever again. So he set forth for the long journey ahead, with high hopes of seeing Midnight’s eve very soon.

Kai was beginning to get dizzy from the wounds he was placed by from Kido and passed out on the icy cold ground. About a week later, he awoke to a cave of moss and trees so dark that light barely even shown threw the trees, he got up and went to the open area and meet up with a group of leopards. He looked around and realized that he was in the land called Piana, land of the Cats. He looked up to see the moon, only, the moon and sun was out and they had the sign of Leo, both were dark but shown light. Kai found this place fascinating and went on the search to find his love, he knew she was close by, he could smell her. He howled to let her know he was there and sure enough she came running to him. But she was attacked by a group of larger Leopards and dragged by the tail and neck to an opening in front of every clan member of Piana to be judged for treason. Kai went for her aid but was struck down. He awoke next to her and saw that the leopards were going to put them to death for her falling in love with a wolf and for a wolf to set foot on sacred land. Kai saw that Midnight’s eve was scared not for her, but for him, and went to aid off the leopards but was being over-powered, so Kai went for her assistance and they were able to make an opening threw them and ran for cover.

They hide until the opening was clear and left Piana to find a new life elsewhere, were they would be accepted. Before they could even set a paw out of Piana, a group of wolves and leopards were gathered there and the Alpha leader of Woodfall,

Kou, and the leader of Piana, Lansing, were in front of the two great clans to stop Kai and Midnight’s eve from leaving. Kai’s clan had tracked him down for leaving sanctuary of the land and had to punish him. Lansing was to decide what he should do to his daughter, the daughter of the clan’s leader! The leopards decide that she would be killed on sight and went for her throat. Midnight’s eve heard a loud rip and the sound of flesh being torn and blood filling the air, but she felt no pain… where did it come from she wondered? She looked down and saw that it was Kai, he had jumped in front of the attacking leopard and took the fatal kill to the throat. Midnight’s eve saw he love fall and was as cold as the ice land ground. Both clans saw the tears of the leopard leader’s daughter, fall to the ground and die next to her loved one.

The sky above started to shake and acid rain fell down upon the land like boulders, the ground shook and caved upward causing mountains to form, the moon shook away from the sun and disappeared and the sun was like a bright fire and no more shady and full of dark. The trees grew greener and some even turned different colors, the ground shot up grass that resembled small tiny trees over the icy land. The icy land was no more. The planet was blowing strong winds of anger. The clans looked down at the two dead bodies and saw their bodies no more, but to turn into a mere spirit being shot around all over their planet and disappear as a bright blue light. The clans believed that a wolf’s love caused all of this and called it a wolf’s curse. They believe every time the sky bleeds the water, a loved one is lost and Kai feels there pain as he did when he lost his own love. When the earth shakes, it is when someone is in pain and Kai shows his pain. When the sun comes out and the moon is gone, it shows that Kai is watching all of us, and when the sun goes down and the moon comes up, Kai is protecting us.

And when the wind blows, it is Kai running with Midnight’s eve.

Reader’s Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

It’s been raining cats and dogs until yesterday and I can hear the lawn and the weeds growing. I can only agree with Larry from HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary regarding the severity of our thunderstorms. We also have experienced quite a number of unusually heavy electrical storms up here, even though we are used to more severe lightning than what people in lower-altitude areas normally experience (okay, Larry’s place is a mere 60 m lower than our place, so that doesn’t really apply). Anyway, it began last season but this season it’s really bad and the pack has realized this too. Taima started to get nervous about thunder and lightning only three years ago when lightning struck the roof of the garden cottage, which is close to the main house, burning a sizable hole into it. I have to admit that the “bang” was so loud that even Ted and I almost slipped from the couch to under the table. Funny enough Kajack II and Ascar II got a fright too but quickly calmed down afterwards. Taima, on the other hand, was trying to find a place to hide, running around like a headless chicken and only calmed down when the storm was over. From then on she has always been getting nervous when a thunderstorm approached and also feels uncomfortable on New Year’s Eves because of fireworks. Kajack and Ascar in contrast couldn’t have care less.

This season it’s a different story – Kajack II now also clearly dislikes thunder and lightning, and although he does not panic as badly as Taima does he wants to be close to Ted and me, best to lie on the couch next to Ted with direct body contact or sit on my lap. The latter manoeuvre always gets him into trouble with Ascar II, because he thinks it to be disrespectful (or he is simply jealous that there is not enough space on my lap for the two of them). Taima starts to panic already when she hears thunder from what seems as far away as Bloemfontein. Ascar II is the only one now who stays calm, although he also gets as close to us as possible when the thunder gets really loud or rumbles so heavily that the floor starts shaking. And every time lightning strikes somewhere around us; meanwhile we can tell by the brightness of a lightning if it has hit and in such cases you automatically pull your head between the shoulders, hoping it has not struck the house, the power line or the cottage.

Recently, Ted was enjoying a hot bath to relax when a thunderstorm approached. I could see the clouds moving in on us quite fast, and from the direction it was coming I knew it would hit us full blast. I told Ted to better hurry to get out of the tub, because he had already been hit twice in the bath tub by lightning striking our water tower and electrifying his bath water (we have one of these large, deep, old cast-iron bath tubs). First Ted was reluctant to get out of the hot water so soon and he also had just shampooed his hair, but when he realized how fast the storm was closing in on us he quickly changed his mind. Better not to try your luck too hard and hope that you will survive the third hit too.

I have never believed in drugging our animals to calm them down but now I have started to investigate the different options available. The problem is that the moment you can hear the first thunder from afar you will get nothing down Taima’s throat, not even her most favourite treat, so it’s very difficult to find something suitable for her. I have heard (and also found on the Internet) about remedies that come in the form of room sprays or as burners with a liquid to stick into a wall plug similar to the mosquito killing stuff, but they must be run permanently, cost a fortune, and will last just for 10 days or so.

If you have a similar problem and have found something that works well without being a threat to the animal’s health, please share it with us. I’m sure there are many readers out there who are also trying to find the best solution and would be thankful for useful tips as well.

Will be continued…

Volume 14, Issue 171, January 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 171, January 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

A Happy New Year to all friends of wolves!

The festive season for me was one of very mixed emotions. Elated that Erin was finally getting better, even if slowly, one frustrating piece of news after the other hit me: The German Minister of Bad-taste Jokes, Klöckner, bitching about “making Germany safe of wolf attacks once more” in Trumpet style, locked-in-outdated-tradition Japan and the whales, the new Brazilian Über-Aryan tooting that his country’s rainforests were just “unused space”, and eventually the Horrorclown’s mock-administration trimming their sights on wolves once more. Criminals wherever you look these days! And then, just the day before yesterday, we learnt that two wolves, one of which I knew very intimately, were killed and one injured by a lightening strike at the sanctuary in Reitz. It was just too much!

What have we got for you in our first newsletter of the year, in the fourteenth year since we started it? News snippets, of course, and most of them bad. Sorry, but it is certainly not our fault.

We found a truly extraordinary contribution to the understanding of both man and wolf that we are very happy to reprint here and so make it available to an even broader public. I can only urge you to read what Rick Lamplugh has put together with his finely honed blade of a mind!

We have a wolf tale, of course, and Erin gives all of us an update.

Enjoy it! And if your New Year’s resolutions include doing something for needy wolves – 500 x 50 still needs a few people to join! Details can be found in the National News section.

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs.

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

  1. You Can Start the New Year with a Thrilling Adventure!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of adventure programs for people of all ages. Our programs are all led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts! Visit our website for a complete list of programs.

Tracking the Pack

April 26-28, 2019

Friday 5 p.m. CDT– Sunday 10 a.m. CDT

Adventure Programs.

Program Rates: Non-member $135, Member $120

Registration Deadline: April 12, 2019

Want to experience the life of a biologist? Join us for this wolf research weekend adventure! Discuss wolf research and management, learn what tools biologists use in the field to locate and study wild wolves and test your new skills with our telemetry equipment. We’ll even head into the field to search for the signal of wild wolves in the area. Enjoy our What’s for Dinner? program and observe our ambassador wolves feeding on their dinner before heading out on a wolf howling safari! Wrap up on Sunday morning with a Q&A.

Register here: https://www.wolf.org/programs/learning-adventures/tracking-the-pack/

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration: here.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From Gary

Well I can hardly believe that it is already the 28th of December as I sit and frantically bash this out. Christmas has come and gone in a blur with much of the shopping done on the 24th, something I have always desperately tried to avoid and usually failed. Glenda and I got off a plane from business meetings in Dubai on the 20th Dec and hit the ground running, to top it off I have picked up some bug, which has left me with a middle ear infection in my right ear.

I think about the short, (almost) four months since we had the meeting in Larry’s kitchen on the 8th September. Thanks to all the contributions, both financial and physical, I believe we have made a good start in this short time, and so may it continue into 2019. I am not going to bore you by listing all the thanks due to so many of you, and besides I am bound to leave somebody out unintentionally, it’s what happens at my advanced age. There is however 1 person I must single out for my (and I’m sure all ‘our’) heartfelt thanks, Larry Wayne Paul. You single-handedly did more than the rest of us put together and without your care and dedication, around three hundred (last count) animals would not have a home. Whilst the rest of us enjoyed a relaxing December and celebrated the New Year, Larry continued to take care of the animals no matter what day of the year or the weather or the finances….life at the sanctuary continues. Larry, what you do for these animals cannot be measured in normal terms, so from all of us a heartfelt THANK YOU and please continue to do what you are doing.

We have already started thinking of some new (for HuskiRomi) ways of bringing in additional badly needed funds to step up a gear in the New Year and I would urge all of you who think of things to put them on the table and let’s see greater participation from all the Wolf People in 2019.

I wish every single one of you everything of the best for the New Year and leave all of you with this challenge. Plan at least two visits to the sanctuary during the year and in doing so bring at least two ‘new’ visitors who have never been to our sanctuary. This is how we will spread the word about the great work that Larry and his team are doing there, and hopefully more people will try to help in their own ways. Just remember, “Mighty oaks from little acorns grow”.

From Nina Oosthuizen

Summer is in full swing here at the sanctuary. Armed with a costume, I spent most of my recent time here in the sanctuary’s reservoir Hermanus, to cool down. There is quite something about having a swim while overlooking the animals in their enclosures at the sanctuary. On my first night we were a whole bunch of people in what I call a meeting of the United Nations in the water… Normally I only have the animals for company, but this time an American lad, French guy, British dude, Chilean lady and two Germans joined me. Hannetjie brought some foreign volunteers to experience the sanctuary and they camped over… We shared a fire with them and were very much impressed when one of the German men took over from me to braai the meat. We were mostly impressed because he didn’t burn any of the food – I was watching him like a hawk! I then continued to have an incredible “Birthmas” with Larry and the animals this year… It’s usually hard to celebrate my birthday as it falls on Christmas and most people are away or spending it with family.

The weather here is hot but perfect so grab your tents, book the log cabin and come spend some time in the water and with the animals.

Frans’s Ramblings

This morning I read an article from the Cape Argus stating that a large percentage of holidaymakers never give their furry friends another thought before they take off on holiday. I am still taking Yiska and co out for almost daily walks in the neighbourhood and this made me think how obvious the changes at some of the houses in the area are where the humans have left on their well-deserved holiday break. Dogs that are usually not close to the street are standing barking at the gates. Small dogs that can easily slip through palisade fencing are out on the sidewalks and at a couple of places the dogs are nowhere to be seen, hopefully away with their owners or booked into their very own holiday kennels. At one house an old Boerboel is just lying sadly at the gate the whole day, not even looking up to greet us as we walk on by. In all the cases I can but pray that they, as well as all the other types of furry friends, are well taken care of and by that I do not mean somebody coming to dump some food for them every second or third day of the week, which unfortunately is what happens in many cases.

I also got worked up about the fireworks war that I was expecting over Christmas and especially on New Year’s Eve. I doubt if I will ever again be anyplace else than at home on New Year’s Eve to take personal care of Yiska, Wahya and Titus. When Yiska was a small pup, he was not perturbed at all by fireworks, but about three years ago we had something resembling a war zone in the area on New Year’s Eve and ever since then, he is extremely nervous and scared of fireworks and even far away thunder. We cannot do anything about thunder (which I find worse this year than in the past), but I honestly believe that there should be an outright ban on all noisy types of fireworks. Unfortunately the “me and I” crowd will arrogantly dismiss anything somebody like me has to say about it.

Our wish, as a family, to you, your family and all your furry friends is a new year filled with the best that you can wish yourself.

From the sanctuary

In closing the newsletter and the year I can only say, “wow, what a year this has been”. Frans has been with me for a number of years and this is what we always dreamt about, a proper working committee, good sponsors and a well-run sanctuary. This has been our biggest year since we started HRWS and a lot of you have been with us as we’ve grown. We salute you for jumping on board and for not jumping ship whenever we hit a stormy patch. I walk around with pride; people tell me what an amazing place HRWS is and this is all through the commitment of our ongoing supporters.

The rondavel is taking shape nicely, no space for pictures but if you follow us on Facebook you will see regular updates on the progress.

Biliary – our biliary has come down and I can only put a lot of this down to some herbal medication Gail Pedra has given us, which we give to our wolves on a weekly basis. We did start out on a rather aggressive action to get HRWS under control and now it’s once a week. You can contact Gail on 083 275 2076, apart from being a witch she also deals with horses so this is not only for wolves but all kinds of animals. Her farm is called Witch Wood.

I want to thank you all once again and to wish you all a fantastic 2019, may you have all the wolf blessings that you deserve.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

  1. CALENDARS !

Who do you recognize, who do you think you will find on our glossy pages?
Only one way to find out 😉

Place your order and email us for your copy, but don’t wait too long, orders are coming in
Each calendar costs ZAR 200,00 and you may choose to pick them up from a central point in JNB, (if possible drop-offs can be organized with the company), or you can have it sent to you personally via PostNet2PostNet for ZAR 99,00.
If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email us at:
Committee@Huskyromi.co.za
Payment can be made to the HuskyRomi bank account (Please note, this is the only account that HuskyRomi uses)
Bank details are as follows:
Husky Romi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
Reg.Number 067-956-NPO
Acc No. 62296463989
Branch code. 230833
Cheque Acc
You will be personally contacted to confirm your order.
Alternatively, you can purchase your calendar when you visit our stall on Mutters Day on November 10th, pop in, say hi and meet our hardworking team!
So, buy a calendar – for you, your mom, your neighbour, your vet, your dogwalker, for Christmas stockings, birthday presents, coffee table showpieces, eyecatchers in your home, for any reason and occasion our calendars are the best!
Your generosity helps us take care of our animals and your continuing support is greatly appreciated.

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, summarized and translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here.

1. Germany: Licences to Kill

The coalition of CDU and SPD in Saxony has published a new wolf ordinance that is nothing else but a license to eradicate wolves in Germany once again. You can find the details here.

The coalition of SPD and Die Linke in Brandenburg treats itself to a private wolf-killing commando while murderers are released from prison because there is not enough money and staff. Not possible? Read the info here.

The minister of agriculture Klöckner (CDU) wrote an urgent letter to the minister of environmental affairs, Schulz, because she wants it to make easier to kill wolves in the future: more info here.

All this happened in the short time span between Christmas and today. Germany again did not reach its climate conservation target, more and more people die of infections with multi-resistant germs, large-scale livestock farming and the ongoing usage of the dangerous fertilizer Glyphosat make people sick and kill insects by the truckload, and the wastewater treatment plants cannot clear the drinking water efficiently enough of all the drug residues, fertilizer toxins and germs. But the wolf is supposed to be the real problem?

Thanks to the ever-growing lobby of citizens who fight against such human- and animal-scorning politicians, the wolf still has the highest protection status. This year the protest must not only go on, it must even be intensified. Wolf-free zones, wolf ordinances, and wolf shootings clearly contravene EU rights. Germany too has committed itself to these contracts and has to stick to them; otherwise Germany, respectively the federal states, will be fined. It already happened to Lower Saxony because it has established too few nature reserves.

We, of Wolfsschutz Germany, will fight with all our strength for the wolf this year again. We will continue to inform, disclose fake news and, if necessary, take legal steps against politicians. We are out in the wolf areas daily, and we look for people living in the German wolf areas who love to be out in nature and want to play a more active role. We need people who act quietly and circumspectly and think before they do something. Self-promoters and those who threaten others don’t fit in with us. We are not interested in the sidekicks, we want the masterminds. Our members can act anonymously, and if charges must be laid we do that in the name of the association with our members remaining protected.

2. Germany: Perfidious Plan to eradicate Wolves – we publish a secret assessment

Last week we received a number of documents, which are in connection with the draft for the new Saxony wolf ordinance. It’s called “Contingency actions against encroaching wolves”, written by Dr. Georg Brüggen, lawyer and former minister, in August last year. Starting with the options to bypass animal protection through to definitions of origin, this ordinance is a slap into the face of nature and animal protection. In Saxony, the wolf falls under game law, but until now remained protected all year round. In the future, however, the shooting of wolves shall be allowed.

All that makes it clear who really rules Saxony: the farmers lobby. We have published the ordinance for you here.

From Endangered Species Coalition Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

  1. USA: Stop the Trump plan to kick wolves off of the endangered species list

Wolves dodged a major threat from Congress this year but an even bigger attack is on the horizon.

Donate today to fight the Trump Administration’s plans to kick gray wolves off of the endangered species list and a group of generous donors will match your gift–doubling your wolf-saving impact: Donate here.

Gray wolves have only just begun to return to all of the wild places they once roamed before being eradicated by hunting, trapping, and habitat loss. Our efforts to bring them back have achieved successes that are truly worth celebrating–wolves now roam the Northern Rockies and are expanding every year. But all of this is at risk from the Trump Administration.

The Trump U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is likely to announce soon that it plans to remove Endangered Species Act protections from wolves across the continental United States. You read that right. Every gray wolf in every state could lose the crucial protections that have allowed them to recover to their current fragile state.

This would lead to hunting, trapping, and in the case of Wisconsin, the use of packs of dogs to chase and kill wolves. The courts ruled in in 2017 that wolves in the Great Lakes region were entitled to protections after the USFWS attempted to strip them of these protections years before that.

Help stop the Trump Administration’s plan to allow wolf hunting nationwide with your year-end 100% tax-deductible donation today: Donate here.

The likely national delisting of gray wolves is the Trump U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s reckless attempt to get around the requirements of the Endangered Species Act that the court based its decision on. Because the Service is unable to legally remove protections for wolves in one region, it intends to remove them from all.

This is a grotesque abuse of the Endangered Species Act and will set back wolf conservation–and the conservation of other species that the Trump administration could decide are politically inconvenient–immeasurably. We are already working with our organizational partners and activists around the country to fight it, but I need your help. Please make your year-end gift today to stop this attack on gray wolves and the Endangered Species Act: Donate here.

  1. USA: You did it – Wolves kept their Endangered Species Act protections in 2018

Last year–this Congress and administration–was a very challenging period for endangered species and for our country’s gray wolves in particular. Members of Congress that are intent on taking the protections these majestic animals need tried time after time to pass legislation to do so.

And every time they tried, you stood up. When endangered species needed you most, you spoke out in defense of wolves and of endangered species protections.

You called, you emailed, you tweeted, you even went to the local offices of your senators and representatives to tell them that you expect them to protect the Endangered Species Act. You did all of this to keep gray wolves and other imperilled species protected and to keep the law that safeguards them safe.

So today, I want to thank you on behalf of our community and the plants, fish, and animals it works to protect. Your support was and will continue to be crucial to our success in keeping gray wolves and other endangered species safe.

We need to hit the ground running in 2019 to fight attacks that we know are yet to come and those that are in progress, such as the massive weakening of the Endangered Species Act the administration began this year.

Thank you for everything you did in 2018 and for your ongoing support in the New Year to keep endangered species protected.

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE December 1-31, 2018

Due to the federal government shutdown, updates for the month of December were only available for Arizona and the FAIR.  Program updates for New Mexico from the month of December were not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared.

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website www.atfws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

Due to the federal government shutdown, updates for the month of December were only available for Arizona and the FAIR at the time this report was prepared.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable. Year-end population counts for 2018 continued during the month of December.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and f1683)

In December, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR. Yearling f1683 and AM1338 were documented travelling separately.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In December, the IFT documented yearling f1686 making dispersal movements from the pack’s territory within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In December, the IFT continued to document M1477 travelling with an uncollared wolf in a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697)

In December, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences. The IFT conducted hazing efforts on the Elk Horn Pack on one occasion when the pack was located in the community of Alpine. Male mp1695 was documented travelling separate from the rest of the pack in New Mexico.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)

In December, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling, m1677 was documented travelling separate from the rest of the pack in the east central portion of the ASNF. Male mp1789 was documented making dispersal movements from the pack’s territory in the east central part of the ANSF in December.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, fp1794, and fp1825)

In December, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF and occasionally in the north eastern portion of the FAIR. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)

In December, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, and fp1792)

In December, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling m1661 was found dead in AZ; the incident is currently under investigation.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In December, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In December, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In December, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared AM1382

In December, the IFT documented AM1382 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In December, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)

In December, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559, AF1283 and f1674)

In December, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR. They were occasionally documented travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF. M1559, from the Tu dil hil Pack, has been documented travelling with the Tsay-O-Ah Pack since September 2018 and is now considered part of the Tsay-O-Ah Pack.

Single collared F1679

In December, F1679 of the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared M1824

In December, M1824 was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR, north central and north eastern portions of the ASNF and the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Updates for wolf packs in New Mexico from the month of December were not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal government shutdown.

MORTALITIES

During the month of December, yearling m1661 of the Saffel Pack was located dead in Arizona. The incident is under investigation. December mortality data for New Mexico was not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal shutdown.

INCIDENTS

During the month of December, there were no confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock in Arizona. There was one nuisance incident in Arizona. December depredation and nuisance data for New Mexico was not available from the USFWS at the time this report was prepared due to the federal shutdown.

On December 8, the IFT hazed the Elk Horn Pack after locating the wolves in an open pasture in Alpine, AZ near residences.

On December 5, WMAT investigated a dead calf on the FAIR.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed dog kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

There were no communication/coordination updates from Arizona during the month of December.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In December, Emily Schafsteck and Jared Black joined the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program to work for the Arizona Game and Fish Department as wolf technicians.  Welcome Jared and Emily.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AZGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

How Wolves and Humans Are Alike

by Rick Lamplugh

While some people see wolves as vicious killers to be feared, hated, and eradicated, I see them as essential predators that we have much in common with.

Some commonalities lead to conflict. Our similar preferences in habitat encourage clashes. Wolves can live most places we do: forests, prairies, tundra, mountains, deserts, swamps. They can thrive even in Europe and Asia, areas dense with humans.

Our similar tastes in food leads to competition. Wolves and humans both enjoy sheep, cattle, deer, and elk. Many humans would rather kill wolves than share with them.

Wolves and humans are both territorial. We string barbed wire, draw lines on maps, and kill thousands of wolves in our misguided attempt to protect “our” territory.

But some similarities don’t necessarily create conflict. If we understand these other ways we are similar to wolves, we might feel a stronger bond with these essential predators.

Both species evolved in similar ways, in families, found strength in numbers. Members of any healthy family—human or wolf—assume specific roles. Like human parents, the alpha pair makes decisions and controls the pack. Other members contribute to the pack’s survival. In their families, wolves—like humans—play, show affection, feed and discipline their young, and mourn their dead.

Wolves and humans exhibit a range of different personalities: some are loners; some are lovers; some are leaders.
Wolves and humans both use non-verbal communication. A wolf’s postures and facial displays express aggression and fear, dominance and submission without words.

Wolves, as well as coyotes, red foxes, and domestic dogs, even experience “human” emotions such as joy and grief. In his book, The Emotional Lives of Animals, evolutionary biologist Marc Bekoff writes that while animals may experience some emotions that humans can’t understand, we can understand many of their feelings. Observing is the key.
Bekoff observed, for example, how body language revealed the grief a pack of wolves felt after losing a low-ranking female. The grieving animals lost their spirit and playfulness. They no longer howled as a group. Instead, they sang alone in a slow mournful cry. They held their heads and tails low and walked softly and slowly when they came upon the place where a mountain lion had killed their pack mate. I’m struck by how the changes are similar to those a human family may experience after losing a loved one.

If wolves and coyotes can experience emotions that humans feel, can they also become mentally impaired? Bekoff asks this intriguing question and then concludes that since many psychological disorders have been diagnosed in dogs, “there’s no reason why this couldn’t be true for their wild relatives.”

The similarity between wolves and humans goes even deeper: Both are moral creatures. Not long ago most scientists believed that animals lacked a moral compass. But times and attitudes change. When Bekoff and bioethicist Jessica Pierce wrote their book Wild Justice: The Moral Lives of Animals a few years ago, they reported that the “staggering amount of information that we have about animal intelligence and animal emotions” now leads more scientists to say that animals can act with compassion, altruism, forgiveness, trust, and empathy. “In humans,” say the authors, “these behaviours form the core of what we call morality.”

I don’t always associate the words compassion and empathy with wolves and coyotes. Sometimes when I observe both these animals in Yellowstone, I see a dog-eat-dog world: an alpha puts an upstart in its place, two packs battle over territory, a coyote dies trying to share in a wolf pack’s feast.

But wolves and coyotes live in tight social groups built on a network of relationships that depends on trust, reciprocity, and flexibility, just as human relationships do. Animals in such groups, say Bekoff and Pierce, live according to a code of conduct that discourages some behaviors and encourages others, that fosters cooperation and coexistence.

The ability to get along, in fact, may determine the ultimate size of a wolf pack. For a long time scientists thought that available food regulated pack size. But Bekoff and Pierce point to research by wolf expert David Mech that shows pack size may be regulated by social factors and not just food. My interpretation of Mech’s findings: pack size is governed by the number of wolves in the pack that can bond versus the number of wolves viewed as competition. When those numbers are out of balance—not enough bonders, too many competitors—packs splinter.

Philosopher Mark Rowlands also believes that many animals—including rats, chimpanzees, and dogs—feel emotions such as love, grief, outrage, and empathy. When acting on those emotions, animals choose to be good or bad. In his book, Can Animals Be Moral?, Rowlands presents examples suggesting that animals know right from wrong. Though humans possess a more developed moral consciousness, he says that animals can act for reasons that require an awareness of and concern for others. They can act morally.

Several years ago, a group of prominent scientists signed the Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness. The scientists declared that rapidly evolving scientific evidence shows that many animals are conscious and aware in the same way humans are. And that animals act with intention. Consciousness, awareness, and intention are keystones of morality.

If we accept that we have much in common with wolves, we must treat them differently.
If we believe that animals can act morally, can experience emotions such as joy and grief, can even become mentally impaired, then we must make sure that our actions match our beliefs. We must, as Bekoff writes, treat these other beings with respect, appreciation, compassion, and love. “There’s no doubt whatsoever that, when it comes to what we can and cannot do to other animals, it’s their emotions that should inform our actions on their behalf, and we can always do more for them.”

Yes, we can always do more for wolves. And we should do less to them. We are far too similar to wolves to fear and hate and kill them.

Original article at: https://ricklamplugh.blogspot.com/2016/02/how-wolves-and-humans-are-alike.html

Rick Lamplugh lives in Gardiner, Montana, USA, and writes to protect wildlife and preserve wild lands. His bestselling In the Temple of Wolves and the award-winning sequel, Deep into Yellowstone, are available signed from Rick or unsigned on Amazon.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 157

Shadows of Grey and White by ravenwinged_99

The air carried a stillness, a gentle reminder of the wounds, which his mate now tended too. The green eyes quietly closing with every loving touch, the wounds of past and past lives forgotten about in the quiet folds of the snow and the fading sun. His eyes scanned, almost lost in the moments when she would nurture him back to health, fixating on some unknown quality, which evaded every other living soul. In the hunts, she ran with him; a quiet thunder padded out on the soft folds of early snow.

In the pack there were only two, he and his mate. Her beautiful grey coat was bushy, her eyes always locked on him as he left to get food or snarled innocently to avoid confrontation. His black coat was never hard to miss, the imprint of love and faithfulness written all over his smile. As the winter subsided, she could hear his heartbeat, calling out beyond the love they had. In the approaching sun she knew that his time would be coming soon, that the bonds of trust would transcend into heavens shadows and she would be alone. As he kissed and said good-bye to her, her tail cowered, left without a reason to cry as he left one last time. The night called with a warning, the crows melancholy voices screeching of death and shadows…after midnight the wolf came home, his spirit rested and laid beside his mate, unaware of the dream of living which had passed him by.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

A Happy New Year to all of you, and I’m happy to report that I’m back amongst the living. Usually I’m not one getting sick often – a cold every 3 to 4 years is what usually happens to me on that front – but this time it really hit me hard. After not feeling myself for quite some time I came down with an outbreak of shingles in my face, covering my left forehead and eye. There had been no warning, it just happened from one day to the other, leaving me looking like somebody who was about to go to a Halloween party, not to mention the pain, fever and complete loss of energy. I rapidly lost a lot of weight and still struggle to regain my strength, but I’m on a good way and feel better by the day. The worst experience during that ordeal was that whenever I came close to a computer screen or cell phone it triggered an immediate pain attack, so severe that it  almost made me faint. So much for electromagnetic smog not being a threat to your health.

However, I’m looking and feeling like a human again and even had a chance to enjoy the Christmas season and the New Year celebrations, the latter of which were much to our liking in that they were amazingly quiet. The morning of the 31st we had received an e-mail from our municipality reminding everyone that the use of fireworks without a special licence was strictly forbidden, that you would be heavily fined if caught, and that security and police were on extra patrols to catch everybody violating this rule in the act. At midnight we indeed only heard some fireworks going off in the distance, most likely from one or two of the restaurants in the area having a New Year’s Eve party and a licence. It was raining quite hard and we were not sure if the general calm was thanks to the new rules or just the rain, but the next day was dry and it was still quiet, and we and our animals were grateful for that. Thanks to the municipality for finally making this decision!

I’m also happy to report that the rainy season has started eventually up here, which is very welcome and a great relief. It’s so nice to see the garden turning green again and everything being in full flower, and the dust has settled nicely, too. The only problem is that the rain almost always comes in the company of a thunderstorm. After our garden cottage was hit by a bolt of lightning three years or so back Taima turns into a nervous wreck the moment she hears thunder even from afar. She moves around like an anxious tiger in a cage, walking from one room to the next, shivering like leaves on a tree in a storm, breathing heavily and very fast, and there is nothing we can do but try and convince her that everything is perfectly fine and that nothing can happen to her. It’s particularly bad when it happens during the night, because nobody can get to sleep until it’s over. We tried quite a number of remedies, but we cannot keep her drugged all the time just in case we get a thunderstorm, and the moment we know there is one coming it will take too long for the effect to kick in or you cannot get the stuff into her in the first place. First it was only she, but in the meantime she has also infected Kajack; he is not as bad as she is, but you can clearly see that he doesn’t feel comfortable and finds Taima’s behaviour very alarming. Ascar is the only one staying calm, but he seems to be a bit overwhelmed by all this nervousness, not knowing what to do to calm his pack down, so he will do what he can do best – beat up Kajack. I think he is just insecure of what to do, but thinks he has to do something and so he goes for the lowest-ranked in his pack. The funny thing is when Ted then reprimands him he comes and wants to get on his leash, looking for it and trying to push his head through the smooth chain. Then Ted will help him with it and he just lies down next to us, turning very quiet and even falling asleep. It looks as though all he wants is to get rid of the responsibility for his pack, and the moment he is on leash he will have handed this responsibility over to Ted and it is no longer his job to find a solution to the problem.

No matter how old you get or how many years you live with these amazing animals, you keep on learning something new. Now, when we hear a thunderstorm coming we will put his leash on the table so that he can decide if and when he wants it, and Kajack can now relax, too.

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 170, December 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 170, December 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

 Let future generations understand what we loved and why

Wishing all our readers an enjoyable Festive Season
and a fulfilling New Year

www.safow.org

 

Till next year,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs.

 Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

 

Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From the Den of Gary and the Steering Committee

So it came to pass that a number of the clans gathered together in the place called La Vue in the district of Mulders Drift on the 10th day 0f the 11th month to celebrate the taming of the wolf. And this gathering was called Muttterrs owing to the great numbers of non-wolves that were brought forth to show off their man-made teachings such as dancing, obedience and similar non wolf traits.

Some members of the wolf clan known as HuskyRomi did come forth but without their beloved Huskies or wolves for fear that the non wolves present might exhibit their man learned jealousies and in fits of rage may fall upon members of the wolf clan and in so doing might well endanger and cause much hardship to themselves and have to be tended to by a vet. The two-legged servants of the wolf clan, being shrewd of mind did bring with them in their great four wheeled chariots many items that the non wolf servants might desire to acquire for themselves and also for their lords the non wolves.

And so, the day dawned bright and the God Ra did throw down much light and heat upon the place of Muttterrs and the servants, never being satisfied lamented the fact that it was felt that the gods had sent forth too much heat and that some shade would be preferred. The wolf people however took advantage of this and made available for barter Doggee Ice cream which was devoured with much relish by the Muttterrs contenders. All but one of the Jack Russell clan who preferred to pursue a spherical object thrown by his servant. Word soon spread that this non wolf must have been under the spell of a cat.

Whilst the non wolves were scoffing the cool delights of the wolf people their two legged servants observed with great desire the dress normally worn by the wolf people and many parted with their hard-earned stipends so they could appear to be one with the wolf clan. The people of the wolf clan were happy in that only a small amount of non wolf people had attended the Fayre the wolf clan of HuskyRomi would benefit and do some good for the clan.

It is said that the servants of the wolves did howl greatly before retiring early to their sleeping mats that night to dream of the many things that they would be able to provide for their wolf masters in the future. It is also said that the leading wolf servant La Ree did ululate long into the night for he required additional funding to continue with the wolf Ron Da Vel. The structure that La Ree has named the Aud-I-torium.

So as we approach the great festival that celebrates the end of the year, whatever your beliefs or Gods, may I wish you all a safe and joyous celebration. Drive your chariots and the like with great care of the others sharing the highways and byways and be sure to give the wolves and non wolves that you serve something special at this time of the year as we enjoy the warm rays cast down upon us by the God Ra and my Horus be gentle with the passing of the hours until we meet in the future. Joyous howls to you all

Gary

We’ve been extremely busy out here at the sanctuary with construction, fighting biliary, upgrading fencing and the other jobs that need to be taken care of on a daily basis. We were very fortunate to tell our story to the nation with a full length insert on Kwela. In our village I have been risen once again to celebrity status. It means a lot to these people when one of their own is seen on television, especially a full documentary. I’ve also been inundated with messages of support and inquiries.

We’re in the process of building new dams within the enclosures and increasing the shading around the sanctuary. Summer is here so when you come to visit the wolves, bring your swimming costume or a pair of shorts and take a dip at ‘Hermanus’ where we enjoy whale watching.

From Nina Oosthuizen

Hi everybody! I’m the sanctuary’s resident journalist and feral human habitant who loves to camp with the huskies. I found my home here in 2017, I was having a rough time with life in general and Larry and the animals adopted me (poor them). This month, I spent time with Nishka’s pups and I am gob smacked at how much they’ve grown in just six months. Some of them are as big as Trigger already… This is why it’s not always a good idea to cross-breed wolves with certain types of dog breeds. They are going to be HUGE. Walking around the sanctuary I found a lot of new faces due to the animal’s human guardians having to give up on them. From not being able to handle the intensity of the breeds to emigrating, there always seems to be an endless amount of excuses. With Christmas around the corner, I’d like to make a plight in reminding everyone what the Festive Season is about… Don’t bankrupt yourself by buying expensive gifts for one another, rather buy a HuskyRomi T-shirt, Cap or Calendar and support the sanctuary and in turn the animals. My family already know what they’re getting this year.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?
Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form
Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141
E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!
Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:
27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

  1. CALENDAR SNEAK PEAK !

Who do you recognize, who do you think you will find on our glossy pages?
Only one way to find out 😉

Place your order and email us to reserve your copy, but don’t wait too long, orders are coming in
Each calendar costs ZAR 200,00 and you may choose to pick them up from a central point in JNB, (if possible drop-offs can be organized with the company), or you can have it sent to you personally via PostNet2PostNet for ZAR 99,00.
If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email us at:
Committee@Huskyromi.co.za
Pre-orders can be placed as of now and payment confirms your copy
Payment can be made to the HuskyRomi bank account (Please note, this is the only account that HuskyRomi uses)
Bank details are as follows:
Husky Romi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
Reg.Number 067-956-NPO
Acc No. 62296463989
Branch code. 230833
Cheque Acc
To reserve your HuskyRomi calendar please email your details and proof of payment to:
Committee@Huskyromi.co.za
Distribution of calendars will be from 12th November and you will be personally contacted to confirm
Alternatively, you can purchase your calendar when you visit our stall on Mutters Day on November 10th, pop in, say hi and meet our hardworking team!
So, buy a calendar – for you, your mom, your neighbour, your vet, your dogwalker, for Christmas stockings, birthday presents, coffee table showpieces, eyecatchers in your home, for any reason and occasion our calendars are the best!
Your generosity helps us take care of our animals and your continuing support is greatly appreciated.

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary
Banking details:
HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
First National Bank
Account: 62296463989
Branch: 230833
Type: Cheque Acc
Ref: Donation / Your name
…and then get one of your friends to do the same.
Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: URGENT: House votes to delist wolves

On Friday, the House of Representatives voted to delist gray wolves in the lower 48.

This bill, HR 6784, is a last-ditch attempt by this anti-wildlife Congress to strip Endangered Species Act protection for gray wolves in the lower 48 states, leaving each state to determine wolf management for themselves.

A few of those states have already decided protecting wolves isn’t worth the effort.

We can’t abandon wolves to the mercy of hostile states. If we lose this fight, wolves will pay with their lives.

Please, donate today to our Defend America’s Wildlife campaign, and your gift will be tripledDonate here.

  1. USA: There’s still hope (pt. 3)

We’re bringing you our third update in a short series of uplifting messages that we’re sharing with our supporters through the end of the year. These stories remind us all why, even in the direst circumstances, we have reasons to hold on to optimism and hope for wildlife.

As a Defenders supporter, we hope you know that you’re a valued part of America’s premier community of wildlife lovers and activists. Thanks to your support, Defenders works to protect wildlife on the ground in communities ranging from Alaska to Florida.

Our nationwide network includes scientists, organizers and legal experts. Together they monitor local wildlife developments, from panther movements in the Everglades to polar bear denning in the Arctic. They work within their communities to build support for wildlife protection. And they serve as your eyes and ears on the frontlines of wildlife conservation wherever animals are threatened.

Each regional office specializes in the imperilled wildlife of their region. Here are just a few examples:

  • Our Rocky Mountains and Great Plains office is ‘gray wolf central.’ This team takes the lead in the Northern Rockies, not just on wolf recovery efforts, but also on protecting bison, grizzly bears and black-footed ferrets from further devastation.
  • Our Anchorage-based Alaska team serves as our front line for protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, the Tongass rain forest, and a vast mosaic of protected habitats for wolves, bears and other imperilled animals.
  • Meanwhile, our Asheville, North Carolina-based South-east team handles all things red wolf-related, not to mention panthers, manatees and denizens of the unique freshwater habitats that crisscross the region.

And that’s just a small picture of Defenders’ broad work on behalf of wildlife. Our expert team of wildlife advocates is also performing critical conservation work in California, the Southwest, the Northwest and beyond for the imperilled species that depend on us all to ensure they have a future.

We want to share this lesson from our work across the country: even in the states we think of as ‘anti-wolf’ or ‘anti-wildlife,’ there are many, many people who believe as you do – that wildlife and wild places deserve our protection. It’s our job is to help them be heard, so we can ensure wildlife has the voice it needs in every state.

That work would be impossible without the support of wildlife lovers like you. For that you have our undying gratitude.

  1. USA: Heartbreaking: Yellowstone wolf shot and killed

It’s a tragic example of history repeating itself and a heartbreaking loss for Yellowstone wolves.

A former alpha female of Yellowstone National Park’s famed Lamar Canyon pack was shot and killed by a hunter as she made a brief detour beyond the park boundaries. She was known only as 926F.

The death came nearly 6 years to the day after 926F’s mother, a world-renowned wolf known as 832F or ’06,’ met an identical fate.

Your emergency donation to our Defend America’s Wildlife Campaign will help us fight for wolves in court, on the ground, and wherever else we need to take the fight for the wildlife you love. Until December 31st, your gift will be matched 2-for-1, up to a total of $150,000: Donate here.

Although the shooting was legal since the wolf was outside the protected park boundaries, wolves do’t have any way of knowing when they’ve left the safety of the National Park. Unfortunately, neither Montana nor Wyoming have enacted no-kill buffer zones around Yellowstone, and tragically, this isn’t the first wolf killed when it travelled just outside the park.

The killing of 926F is a reminder of how much work we all still have, not only to change laws but to change hearts and minds. That’s one reason that, with your support, Defenders maintains a constant presence in wolf country.

Triple your impact now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=aLrw531-VTibMxzDrnGYeg

As difficult as it may be for you (and me) to comprehend, wolf-haters still exist. No wolf will be truly safe until values change. The good news is, values are changing; poll after poll shows that most Americans are pro-wolf and pro-wolf conservation.

Your emergency donation will help us fight for wolves, in court and wherever we need to take the fight for the wildlife you love: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=1y86bPNtbUlffolqNpOOig 

From Endangered Species Coalition Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

USA: Every gray wolf in the country could be hunted

It is outrageous to even consider intentionally killing animals that number a tiny fraction of what they once did and what they someday could if we let them.

Make a 100% tax-deductible gift today to help keep wolves protected.

Last Friday, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill that would strip every gray wolf in the continental U.S. of Endangered Species Act protections and turn their future over to state wildlife agencies.

Wolves have just begun to recover from near-extinction. Our ancestors trapped, clubbed, shot, and poisoned them in the mid-twentieth century, killing tens of thousands of these native animals.

Our efforts to restore them have been successful–wolves now roam the Northern Rockies, the Great Lakes states, and are coming back to California and the Pacific Northwest states. If these wolves are going to continue to recover and expand to their former landscapes, we need them protected by the Endangered Species Act.

Help us take on the fight to protect gray wolves and the Endangered Species Act with your donation today.

The legislation that was passed in the U.S. House of Representatives puts wolves in real peril. It even jeopardizes the Endangered Species Act itself. There would be no formal rulemaking process and the decision would not be subject to judicial review. The bill chips away at the use of science in listing decisions and replaces it with cold, political calculations. That’s not what the Endangered Species Act calls for and is not any way to recover a species.

I need your help to fight this attack and others like it. Please make your 100% tax-deductible holiday gift today.

Anti-wildlife special interests have a direct line to some members of Congress. Working behind the scenes to weaken protection for wolves and other imperiled species, they have introduced more than 75 legislative attacks on the Endangered Species Act in this Congress alone. They have seemingly unlimited resources and access.

But science and the facts are on our side. With your help, we can continue to stop dangerous legislation such as this from advancing into law. The Endangered Species Coalition is one of the only organizations in the country that works exclusively to protect endangered and threatened species. We bring hundreds of member organizations together and mobilize thousands of activists to keep wildlife safe. Please support this work with a 100% tax-deductible gift today.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

Germany

  1. USA: “Manage Our Wolves Act” passes House of Representatives without Bigg’s Amendment!

Unfortunately, the House of Representatives passed the “Manage Our Wolves Act” last month, and the bill moves on to the Senate.

On the bright side, it seems like Biggs’ anti-lobo amendment was not in the “Mange Our Wolves Act” when it passed the House of Representatives, so at least the Mexican Gray Wolf is currently safe from delisting.

Here is the text of the version of the bill that passed the House: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/6784/text verses the text of the anti-lobo amendment that Biggs proposed: https://amendments-rules.house.gov/amendments/BIGGS_136_xml111318163707377.pdf

Thankfully, there is a chance that the “Manage Our Wolves Act” will not pass. Right now Congress is rushing to get multiple things done before the deadline of December 14, 2018, which will mark the end of the Congressional session and the beginning of the holiday break. If the bill is not voted on before that date, then it dies and the Gray Wolves are safe.

But the Senate still has a week to vote on “Manage Our Wolves Act,” so we cannot assume that a vote will not be held – to do so would be foolish. And we must make sure that any amendments targeting the Mexican Gray Wolf do not make it into the final bill. So if you live in the USA, then please write to your Senators & tell them to both reject any anti-lobo amendment that is proposed and to vote NO on this dangerous anti-wolf bill!

2. USA: Petition’s Stance on Delisting Northern Gray Wolves.

Contrary to what some people seem to think, this petition does not oppose (nor does it support) the delisting of Northern Gray Wolves in and of itself, since their recovery status is currently the subject of scientific debate. However, this petition recognizes that a political delisting of Northern Gray Wolves by Congress will indirectly harm Mexican Gray Wolves, for at least three reasons:

  1. If the Northern Gray Wolf is politically delisted and is subjected to legal killing, then any Mexican Gray Wolf that wanders north of the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) could be mistaken for a Northern Gray Wolf and killed. This would prevent the natural establishment of the Mexican Gray Wolf in suitable habitat that exists north of the MWEPA.
  2. According to many geneticists, an important part of the evolutionary history of Mexican Gray Wolves that should be restored is admixture with Northern Gray Wolves, and admixed Gray Wolves are of conservation value. A political delisting of Northern Gray Wolves would likely prevent the establishment of admixed Gray Wolves, since Northern Gray Wolves could be subjected to legal killing. In addition, this would leave conservationists unprepared on how to recover and manage admixed Gray Wolves should they ever become established, since no plan currently exists for addressing them. And even if admixed Gray Wolves establish a population, they would most likely remain unprotected and subjected to legal killing, which could result in the loss of valuable Mexican Gray Wolf genes from the population.
  3. The political delisting of the Rocky Mountain Gray Wolf has set a precedent of politically delisting other protected species, including the Mexican Gray Wolf, and a political delisting of other Northern Gray Wolves would continue this dangerous precedent. In fact, Congress has already tried to politically delist the Mexican Gray Wolf (hence the existence of this petition).

Therefore, while this petition is specifically focused on preventing the political delisting of highly endangered Mexican Gray Wolves, it is also opposed to the political delisting of any Gray Wolves. So I have posted a different petition to prevent the political delisting of Gray Wolves in general, which more heavily focuses on Northern Gray Wolves – the link to it is attached to this update.

https://www.change.org/p/don-t-let-politics-delist-the-gray-wolf

 

  1. USA: The USFWS: an Unexpected Obstacle to Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery.

Anti-wolf politicians have been fighting Mexican Gray Wolf recovery for years, but recently there has been another party who has surprisingly hindered Mexican Gray Wolf recovery: the USFWS, the federal agency that is in charge of saving the species. About a year ago, the USFWS published a new Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan, and as you probably know by now, this so-called “recovery” plan is more political than scientific.

To emphasize, this petition is only about anti-wolf legislation that targets the Mexican Gray Wolf; this petition is not about the actions that the USFWS takes in recovering the subspecies, though there is no denying that the new Mexican Wolf “Recovery” Plan is highly concerning. So I posted another petition to ensure that the USFWS follows the science in recovering the Mexican Gray Wolf – the link to it is attached to this update. Please sign and share the petition, cause we cannot let the USFWS mismanage the Mexican Gray Wolf into extinction!

From Salty Dog via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

Take action to stop Congress from abandoning gray wolves!

Sierra Club petition:

Congress’ attacks on the Endangered Species Act and the struggling wildlife it protects continue to mount. Just last month Congress introduced the “Manage Our Wolves” act, that will strip Endangered Species protections from all gray wolves in the lower 48.

If they succeed, these attacks will become law, and gray wolf recovery would be devastated. We have less than three weeks to stop this from happening. Take action and add your name now.

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

  1. MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE October 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

Brady McGee started as the Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator on October 1. For the last four years, Brady has served as the USFWS Southwest Region’s Chief for the Branch of Recovery and Restoration. Overall, he has worked in the Southwest Region since 2001 and has extensive experience with the Endangered Species Act, Mexican wolves and the challenges of wolf recovery in the Southwest. Brady has a Masters in Wildlife Biology from Texas State University and a Doctorate degree in Wildlife Science from Texas Tech University.

During October, Brady discussed the Mexican Wolf Program with a variety of cooperators and individuals. Brady will continue to conduct meetings with cooperators and individuals in November to develop a broad understanding of the Program.

Numbering System: Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups. At the end of October, there were 84 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

 

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and f1683)

In October, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR. Yearling f1683 and AM1338 were documented travelling separately.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In October, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory this month within the eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache toward the end of the month in an effort to reduce potential for conflict with livestock.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In October, M1477 continued to be documented travelling with an uncollared wolf in a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, fp1696, and fp1697)

In October, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. A female pup, fp1696, was captured, collared, and released in October.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)

In October, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

Panther Creek AM1382 was not located during the month of October.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, fp1794, and fp1825)

In October, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF and occasionally in the north eastern portion of the FAIR. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. A female pup, fp1825, was captured, collared and released in October.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)

In October, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences. A female pup, fp1823 was captured, collared, and released in October.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, m1680, and fp1792)

In October, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling m1680 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory into New Mexico. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Saffel Pack in an effort to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In October, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In October, the IFT documented F1489 travelling alone in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In October, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

 

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In October, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)

In October, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF. A female pup, fp1828, was captured, collared, and released.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AF1283 and f1674)

In October, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR. They were also occasionally documented travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In October, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR. M1559 was documented travelling with the Tsay-O-Ah Pack.

Single collared M1824

In October, M1824 was captured, collared, and released. Subsequently, M1824 was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central and north eastern portions of the ASNF.

 

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (F1444)

During October, F1444, the only wolf with a functioning collar in the Copper Creek Pack, was captured, collared and released. Female 1444 was documented making wide dispersal movements outside the pack’s traditional range.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354 and AF1456)

During October, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During October, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AM1447, AF1443, and fp1702)

During October, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. The IFT maintained a food cache near the den to support cross-fostered pups and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During October, F1437 and AM1038 were documented travelling together in the Hawks Nest territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, M1556, f1670, m1821, fp1721, and mp1710)

During October, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. A cross-fostered pup, mp1710, was captured, collared, and released in October.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285 and AF1405)

During October, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During October, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and f1684)

During October, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1664, and f1705)

During October, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. In October, f1664 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, F1565, m1669, m1678, fp1826, and mp1827)

During October, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack and implemented continuous hazing efforts to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. A female pup, fp1826, and a male pup, mp1827, were captured, collared and released in October.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399, f1578, and fp1822)

During October, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF. A female pup, fp1822, was captured, re-collared, and released in October.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During October, AF1553 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)

During October, the Squirrel Springs pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared M1486

During October, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1673

During October, M1673 continued to travel in the western portion of the GNF.

 

MORTALITIES

During the month of October, f1664 of the Mangas Pack was located dead in New Mexico; the incident is under investigation. From January 1, 2018 to October 31, 2018 there have been a total of 12 documented wolf mortalities.

 

INCIDENTS

During the month of October, there were eight confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were two nuisance incidents in October. From January 1, 2018 to October 31, 2018 there have been a total of 62 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 29 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On October 5, the IFT took a report from a woman who indicated she had been in a camp trailer on the Apache Sitgreaves National Forest near Forest Road 26 when an uncollared wolf was observed approximately 30-40 yards from the trailer. The woman opened the door of the trailer which caused the wolf to retreat and eventually walk out of sight. The woman stated she believed the wolf was attracted by the sound of the barking dogs from inside the camp trailer.

On October 7, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ.

The investigation confirmed the calf was killed by wolves.

On October 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead yearling cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation confirmed the yearling was killed by wolves.

On October 11, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the calf was killed by wolves.

On October 14, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the cow was killed by wolves.

On October 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation confirmed the cow was killed by wolves.

On October 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the cow was killed by wolves.

On October 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the cow was killed by wolves.

On October 24, the IFT investigated an elk carcass in Alpine that had been killed during the night by wolves approximately 200 yards from the nearest residence. The carcass was removed from the area by the IFT to eliminate further attractant to the wolves returning to the location. Collar data indicated the elk had likely been killed by the Elk Horn Pack.

On October 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the calf was killed by wolves.

On October 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the calf was killed by coyotes.

 

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On October 2, WMAT provided a Tribal program update on KNNB Radio, in Whiteriver, Arizona.

On October 6, AZGFD provided a project update and overview to participants at the Arizona Elk Society/AZGFD elk viewing workshop at Sipe Wildlife Area outside of Springerville, AZ.

On October 12, USFWS personnel provided a project update to approximately 100 people at the International Wolf Symposium. In addition, the merits of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan were debated by AZGFD personnel in front of approximately 500 people that evening.

On October 19, AZGFD provided a project update at the Alpine Alliance monthly meeting in Alpine.

On October 21, USFWS personnel provided a project update and discussed the project with approximately 10 people from the Lobos of the Southwest group.

On October 25, USFWS personnel participated in a panel discussion on wolves at a Timber Wolf Alliance meeting in front of approximately 50 people.

On October 25, AZGFD presented at the Coconino Natural Resource Conservation District conservation outreach forum at the Mormon Lake Lodge in Arizona.

On October 26, USFWS personnel gave a keynote presentation to approximately 150 people associated with the Timber Wolf Alliance annual meeting.

On October 26, USFWS personnel discussed wolves with approximately 20 students at Northland College in Ashland, WI.

On October 27, USFWS personnel discussed wolf biology and behavior with approximately 20 people participating in a tracking class at Northland College in Ashland, WI.

 

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In October, Julia Smith left the IFT to continue her career in wolf recovery efforts. Janess Vartanian also left the IFT in October to continue her career in wildlife conservation. Janess and Julia were tenured members of the IFT and contributed significantly to the efforts of Mexican wolf recovery. Julia and Janess, thank you for all your hard work, dedication and leadership; you will both be missed.

Maggie Dwire was promoted to Deputy Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator in October. Congratulations Maggie.

  1. Monthly Update – Nov. 1-30, 2018

 

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS
The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable. At the end of November, there were 80 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wolves in the population are collared.

IN ARIZONA:
Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and f1683)
In November, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR. Yearling f1683 and AM1338 were documented travelling separately.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)
In November, the IFT documented yearling f1686 in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)
In November, M1477 continued to be documented travelling with an uncollared wolf in a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, mp1695, fp1696, and fp1697) 
In November, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. A male pup, 1695, was captured, collared, and released in November. The IFT started a diversionary food cache to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences. The IFT conducted hazing efforts on the Elk Horn Pack on two occasions when the pack was observed within the community of Alpine.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)
In November, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Yearlings, m1677 and m1681 and mp1789 were documented travelling separate from the rest of the pack in the east central part of the ANSF during a portion of the month.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)
Panther Creek AM1382 was not located during the month of November.
 
Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, fp1794, and fp1825)

In November, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF and occasionally in the north eastern portion of the FAIR. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, fp1791, and fp1823)
In November, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and fp1792)
In November, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Yearling m1680 continued dispersal movements in New Mexico and was found dead in New Mexico in November. The incident is under investigation.  Yearling m1661 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory in the south central portion of the ANSF in late November.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)
In November, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489
In November, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574
In November, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)
In November, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF. Yearling m1672 was not documented in November and is now considered fate unknown.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and fp1828)
In November, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AF1283 and f1674)
In November, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR. They were occasionally documented travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)
In November, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR. M1559 was documented travelling with the Tsay-O-Ah Pack.

Single collared M1824
In November, M1824 was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central and north eastern portions of the ASNF.

IN NEW MEXICO:
Copper Creek Pack (F1444)
During November, F1444, the only wolf with a functioning collar in the Copper Creek Pack, was documented making wide dispersal movements outside the pack’s traditional range.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354 and AF1456)
During November, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)
During November, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and fp1702)
During November, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. The IFT maintained a food cache to support cross-fostered pups and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict. In November, AM1447 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared F1473)
During November, the Hawks Nest Pack was documented travelling together in the Hawks Nest territory in the north central portion of the GNF. In November, AM1038 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, M1556, f1670, m1821, fp1721, and mp1710)
During November, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a food cache to support cross-fostered pups and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285 and AF1405)
During November, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF. 
Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During November, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and f1684)
During November, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. In November, a private trapper in New Mexico caught f1684 and contacted the IFT. The IFT responded, replaced the wolf’s collar, and then released f1684 on GNF.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and f1705)
During November, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the northwestern portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, F1565, m1669, m1678, and mp1827)
During November, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. In November, fp1826 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation. 

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399, f1578, and fp1822)
During November, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)
During November, AF1553 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)
During November, the Squirrel Springs pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT continued efforts in November to maintain a consistent presence in the pack’s territory, as well as haze the pack away from livestock to decrease conflict due to a confirmed depredation in October.

Single collared M1486
During November, M1486 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is currently under investigation.

Single collared M1673
During November, M1673 continued to travel in the western portion of the GNF.

MORTALITIES
During the month of November, the following wolves were located dead in New Mexico: AM1447 of the Frieborn Pack, fp1826 of the Prieto Pack, AM1038 of the Hawks Nest Pack, m1680 of the Saffel Pack, and Single M1486. All of the incidents are currently under investigation by USFWS Law Enforcement.

From January 1, 2018 to November 30, 2018 there have been a total of 17 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS
During the month of November, there were six confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were two nuisance incidents in November. From January 1, 2018 to November 30, 2018 there have been a total of 66 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 31 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On November 14, Wildlife Services investigated two dead calves in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined one calf was a confirmed wolf kill and the other calf died of unknown causes.

On November 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On November 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the cow was killed by wolves.

On November 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead goat in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the goat was killed by a domestic dog.

On November 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigated confirmed the calf was killed by wolves.

One November 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation confirmed the calf was killed by wolves.

On November 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On November 24 and 25, Wildlife Services hazed the Elk Horn Pack after locating the wolves in an open pasture in Alpine, AZ near residences.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION
On November 15, USFS personnel provided a poster presentation at the Second International Wildlife Reintroduction Conference. The conference was attended by approximately 150 people.

PROJECT PERSONNEL
There were no personnel updates for the project during the month of November.

REWARDS OFFERED
The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

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Wolves and Wolfdogs

by Rick Lamplugh

Lawsuit to Create a National Wolf Recovery Plan

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) expects to publish by the end of 2018 a proposal to remove endangered species protection from nearly all gray wolves in the lower 48. To stop this delisting, the Center for Biological Diversity has sued the FWS and Secretary of the Interior Zinke for violating the Endangered Species Act by never providing a comprehensive recovery plan for gray wolves nationwide. The Center’s lawsuit argues that wolves must remain federally protected until the FWS implements a national recovery plan.
A recovery plan, writes the Center, would enable wolves to establish viable numbers in areas where small populations are still recovering, including California, Oregon, and Washington. It would also promote recovery in areas like the southern Rockies, Dakotas, and Adirondacks, which have suitable wolf habitat but no wolf populations.
In their complaint, the Center charges that the FWS has never prepared the required nationwide plan to guide gray wolf recovery efforts and has unreasonably denied a 2010 petition the Center filed to ask for development of that recovery plan. The agency has also failed to review the status of the gray wolf in the last five years, even though the ESA requires them to do so.
The Center wants the court to order FWS to develop a nationwide recovery plan and conduct a five-year status review for the gray wolf.
This may be a long fight. While the delisting proposal is expected in December, wolves will remain protected until the FWS proposal is finalized. That could take a year or so. The Center has filed the complaint and now awaits the FWS response. The Center expects a decision on this issue about a year from now.

In their complaint, the Center includes a number of important facts about wolves and the treatment of these essential predators:

The gray wolf once occupied the majority of North America, excluding perhaps only the driest deserts and the south-eastern U.S. where the red wolf roamed. Scientists estimate that as many as two million wolves may have lived in North America pre-European settlement.

Wolves are important to the ecosystems they inhabit. Studies of gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park and elsewhere demonstrate that wolves significantly shape ecosystems, promoting biodiversity and overall ecological health.

Government agents used deadly poisons and traps to kill wolves during the late 19th century and first half of the 20th century. By 1967, when wolves were first federally protected under a precursor to the ESA, they had been reduced to fewer than 1,000 wolves in north-eastern Minnesota, with a very small isolated population on Isle Royale.

Rather than develop a nationwide gray wolf recovery plan, the FWS developed separate plans for wolves in three areas: the Northern Rocky Mountains, the Great Lakes, and the Southwest. The FWS never developed recovery plans for many areas where wolves could and should recover, including the North-east, Pacific Northwest and California, Southern Rocky Mountains, and Great Plains.

Today, wolves occupy only about ten percent of their historic range in the U.S. with most progress in those three areas covered by recovery plans. Their total population is less than 6,000 wolves. While this represents an improvement in the status of the gray wolf since its protection, threats remain inadequately addressed in both occupied and unoccupied portions of the range.

Because recovery efforts have focused on just three regions and not on gray wolves throughout the lower 48, full recovery has not occurred.

Source: http://ricklamplugh.blogspot.com/2018/12/lawsuit-to-create-national-wolf.html, reprinted with permission

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 156

Vivian-Wolf

by Vivian Wolf Gandion

One day, Hermes, messenger of the gods, was flying over a dense wood when he saw the lovely Artemis, goddess of the hunt, stealthily tracking a wild boar. He fell in love and knew instantly that he must father her son. Swooping down through the trees he grabbed her and flew away to a nearby cave. Less than an hour later a dark-haired girl was born. Hermes was so furious that Artemis had not bore him a boy that he banished the young Vivian, daughter of Artemis, to live forever with the wild beasts and animals of the forest.

Raised by a grizzly bear, she learned from all the woodland creatures, and the great hunters were her teachers. Vivian came to be the goddess of the moon. Soon she learned that not only did she have a great talent for the hunt but also that she could become a creature of it, able to shape shift at will from one form to another. The first of her forms was her human self; eyes as yellow as a cats and long rippling hair, blacker than night, that flowed smoothly over her strong but slim figure of about 16 years. She was already far more poised and beautiful than Aphrodite, the goddess of love, herself. Vivian’s latter shape, an animal larger than a fox but smaller then a bear, was a deep ebony in summer and silvery white in winter. A creature with tawny eyes that could penetrate even the blackest night. Moving without a sound, she was a true hunter that loved a clear, cool night and always yearned for the moon.

As time wore on Vivian became lonely and started to search for another of her kind, another wolf, the name granted her by the other creatures of the wood. Now as Athena, goddess of warfare and wisdom, was travelling through the forest where Vivian was searching for other wolves. She saw the girl, took pity on her, and as Athena approached, Vivian, turned into wolf shape to protect herself from this warlike goddess. When Athena saw this she knew immediately that this was the daughter of great Artemis and rash Hermes. As Athena explained herself to the girl, she began to sense the great loneliness that was broiling up inside the young goddess. Therefore, when Vivian asked her for help, she directed the girl to the one man who might know how to help, Zeus, king of the gods. Without hesitation, Athena took Vivian to see Zeus. When he first heard of what Hermes did he thundered and roared, and threw his great lightning bolts as the two goddesses cowered in the corner, waiting for him to calm himself and once again become reasonable. Then Vivian, with help from Athena, told him her request. Zeus said that he would ponder what he could do and that they should return in a fortnight’s time to receive his answer.

Two weeks later, when Athena and Vivian returned, Zeus spoke, his voice filling the very chasm of time, “Fair Vivian, daughter of Artemis and Hermes, I hear your plea and wish greatly to aid you, for you are more beautiful and poised than the goddess of love herself, a feat never before accomplished. However I cannot help you directly, only give advice. I happen to know that, on a small island in the north, there lives an old and wise man who can tell you where to find another wolf.” So with that and well wishes from Athena, Vivian made for this man who was said to have the answer to her problem.

Since she was a swift runner and never ran out of food for she could hunt anywhere she liked, the trip took but a few days time. Soon she was at the house of the wise man that Zeus had spoken of. As she changed back into her upright form she knocked on the door and a cracked voice came from inside, “Come in Vivian. Yellow-eyed wolf goddess. Black-haired creature of the moon. Come in and I will tell you what you want to know, in time. After all, I am told that you are more beautiful than the goddess of love and that, of course, is hard to do.” Vivian froze, but then remembered Zeus saying something about the old man being a fortuneteller so the surprise was short lived and she quickly entered the house.

In an open hearth a green fire was burning and in the flame she saw shapes and figures flickering along with the fire in which it appeared. Sitting near the hearth was a man with three faces, one, that looked as old as the very mountains themselves, was puffing on a small handcrafted pipe. The second face, which was that of a middle-aged man, about in his thirties was reading a book and paying her no mind. The third was that of a young man, no older than her, who was staring at her as if he were in a powerful trance. In the youngest face she saw something that wasn’t in the other two faces, something that moved her deeply, something called love.

The oldest one spoke in the same voice she had heard coming from the door, “To get what you seek you must grant each of us our hearts desire. My desire is that you bring me the oldest crow alive so that I may learn his secrets.” She nodded but suddenly stopped when a voice came from the face that was hiding behind a thick and crinkled book “Bring me the longest book in the world, The History of the Gods.” She asked if they knew where she could find such things but instead of answering the youngest one chirped, “My only wish is that I may have your fair hand in marriage and that you love me as much as I love you.” Thinking about this Vivian thought of Eros, son of Aphrodite, and said that she would do this but that if she would marry him she must at least learn his name. Their only response was to look at fire and disappear.

With that she captured the oldest crow, found and stole the longest book and borrowed one of Eros’s arrows so that she could prick herself and fall in love with the young man. They were wed and the day after the wedding night she once again spoke with the eldest man. He said that with the crow’s knowledge he could tell her where to find the only other wolf, “Reaching it may not be possible and certainly beyond mortal means.” However, Vivian paid no mind to this small inconvenience, determined to reach her goal.

Vivian learned that at the heart of the moon was a wolf that never has had a name and merely runs through the sky on pure white paws. The stars move away as he soars by, always alone and always yearning for company, before crashing into the sea. And so with her husband at her side, she turned into a wolf and leaped up after the moon. That’s why the wolf is always right behind the moon and sometimes she catches up with the white wolf. To this day there is a small group of great hunters who always run in pack and just can’t help howling at the moon.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Erin has been quite ill for a while and incapable of continuing her diary. She is getting better, even if slowly, and says she will be back shortly.

Ted

Volume 13, Issue 169, November 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 169, November 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

The current heat wave on the Highveld makes it difficult to think clearly, even for us who like it warm. We have nevertheless tried to put together an informative newsletter for this month.

It was just this week that I found a report in a local farmers’ magazine on how the rain pattern in our region has been changing since the year 2000, with the onset of the rainy season having shifted by now from early September to early November, i.e., by a full two months. It is still bone dry as I write these lines, with the few drops that have fallen so far having achieved nothing more than dampening the dust a little. While the rainy season now also lasts longer than in earlier years, i.e., till April to May or even June, the total annual yield of rain has decidedly shrunk. Well, I look at this and immediately think of the Horrorclown’s statement that climate change is Chinese propaganda…

What have we got for you in this month’s issue? Disgusting anti-wildlife politics in the US. But then again, why should nature conservation and species restoration receive more positive effort than all the rest in Adolf Horrorclown’s United States of Destruction? This general attitude and the resultant situation is by no means really mitigated by news just in about a court ruling that the state agency entrusted with conserving wildlife, in this case the red wolf, must do its job and look after and protect the 24 red wolves remaining in the wild. FWS will sure find an excuse to let these disappear as well and make landowners happy. Personally, I keep firmly in place my sanctions against everything Made in America wherever possible. See the News International section.

Wolves are ruthless killing machines, right? If you are interested in facts, I urge you to read what Rick Lamplugh has to say about that. As usual, it is quite eye-opening. If you should be turned on more by fake news, I recommend you continue listening to Idahoan hillbilly farmers and US politicians instead and cancel your subscription to SAFHOWL. See the Wolves and Wolfdogs section.

Like every month, we have a short wolf tale, but Erin found it too hot to put something sensible in writing. She will be back next month, she promised.

Considering that it is a mere five weeks to Xmas, and if you still don’t know what present to select for a wolf lover, my book (Ted Ehrhardt: A Houseful Headful of Wolves) is still available as paperback and E-book from Amazon at  http://amazon.com/dp/1521583714 or http://www.amazon.com/dp/B073DPNN7Q or from any other Amazon Online-shop in both English and German.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs.

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

From the Den of Gary and the Steering Committee

Larry has honoured me by asking me to Chair the Steering Committee to help HuskyRomi move towards a vision of sustainability and growth. Larry called a meeting at the Sanctuary on Saturday, 8th of September. This meeting was attended by Derek, Kim, Larry and myself, (my wife Glenda tagged along to take the minutes), as my right hand ‘lady’, she will assist me as we move forward to help make a difference to HuskyRomi.

We discussed many of the future goals and objectives for the sanctuary and found that there was a great common thread winding its golden way through our dreams and wishes for this place the animals call home. In order to achieve any of our goals, we need to increase the monthly income for HuskyRomi and this means more fundraising, more ‘virtual adoptions’ and more donors. We are in the process of rebranding the sanctuary to give us slightly more ‘corporate’ look and feel however the core values will remain forever, as will the name in memory of Romi. As soon as our rebranding is complete, we will be approaching corporates to start signing up. In return for the donation, HuskyRomi will offer promotion of the company and / or their products in any way possible. Should anyone be interested in Corporate Sponsorship for their company, please contact me for more information.

Sadly, as with any organizational changes some people struggle with change and ultimately get lost along the way, organizations like HuskyRomi are no different in this respect and unfortunately some of the donors have decided to move on to other causes. I do hope that in the not too distant future they will all return to the wonderful animals that are resident at the sanctuary and bring more people back with them.

I am sure that we will try our utmost to live up to the ‘Wolfman’s’ confidence in us, but I must stress that our goals will only be achieved through participation of all of you in moving forward and helping HuskyRomi to become the best possible home to all of the animals resident there.

From the sanctuary

There is a lot happening out at HuskyRomi, everything is very positive, it’s like a breath of oxygen has been breathed in, reminds me of when Frans Badenhorst come on board and injected a whole pile of new ideas and took some of the load off me, since then the load got heavier and Frans made some recommendations telling me to step down from running HuskyRomi and to rather implement a good committee so that I could do the things that I enjoy most, working with my animals, we have an amazing committee onboard and I’m the sanctuary manager.

Not that much to tell you but wait until next month, we are starting to build an 8m Rondavel which will be a reception office / shop and can be used for other small events, i.e., as a small wedding chapel.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?
Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form
Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141
E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!
Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:
27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

  1. CALENDAR SNEAK PEAK !

Who do you recognize, who do you think you will find on our glossy pages?
Only one way to find out 😉

Place your order and email us to reserve your copy, but don’t wait too long, orders are coming in
Each calendar costs ZAR 200,00 and you may choose to pick them up from a central point in JNB, (if possible drop-offs can be organized with the company), or you can have it sent to you personally via PostNet2PostNet for ZAR 99,00.
If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to email us at:
Committee@Huskyromi.co.za
Pre-orders can be placed as of now and payment confirms your copy
Payment can be made to the HuskyRomi bank account (Please note, this is the only account that HuskyRomi uses)
Bank details are as follows:
Husky Romi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
Reg.Number 067-956-NPO
Acc No. 62296463989
Branch code. 230833
Cheque Acc
To reserve your HuskyRomi calendar please email your details and proof of payment to:
Committee@Huskyromi.co.za
Distribution of calendars will be from 12th November and you will be personally contacted to confirm
Alternatively, you can purchase your calendar when you visit our stall on Mutters Day on November 10th, pop in, say hi and meet our hardworking team!
So, buy a calendar – for you, your mom, your neighbour, your vet, your dogwalker, for Christmas stockings, birthday presents, coffee table showpieces, eyecatchers in your home, for any reason and occasion our calendars are the best!
Your generosity helps us take care of our animals and your continuing support is greatly appreciated.

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:
HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
First National Bank
Account: 62296463989
Branch: 230833
Type: Cheque Acc
Ref: Donation / Your name
…and then get one of your friends to do the same.
Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: eNews: The Difference We Make Together

Save Alaska’s Wolves & Bears!

The National Park Service has proposed lifting a ban on extreme killing methods on Park Service lands in Alaska. If the ban is removed, wolves, bears and other predators will be vulnerable to appalling and cruel killing methods that most people strongly oppose. Act fast to save wolves and bears, including pups and cubs, from falling prey to these unethical practices! Take action today.

  1. USA: PROTECT OUR WOLVES: Lawmakers need to hear from you today!

We’ve come a long way toward seeing wolves recover in the lower 48. But we’ve got a long way to go. And if the current anti-wildlife Congress gets its way, most wolf recovery could stop dead in its tracks.

This week, Congress will vote on H.R. 6784, the “Manage Our Wolves Act.” This reckless bill would remove federal protections put in place by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for most gray wolves in the lower 48 states, leaving each state to determine wolf management for themselves.

A few of those states have already decided protecting wolves isn’t worth the effort.

Tell Congress today: don’t abandon ESA protections for wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=lgxokpjvlgr998ISRyZ8Dg

Here’s why we need to defeat this bill while we still can: if H.R. 6784 passes, it will also block judicial review of the decision to delist these wolves. Americans’ hands would be tied in seeking justice as hostile states decide for themselves how to manage wolves.

And in states where they’ve already lost protection, thousands of wolves have been killed.

We already know how gray wolves will fare without ongoing federal protection. States like Wyoming, Montana and Idaho have shown that, left to their own devices, they have no problem indiscriminately killing wolves.

This callous, indifferent approach to wolf management can’t become the norm. We’re counting on you to tell Congress today that wolves deserve our protection!

ACT NOW: TELL CONGRESS “NO” ON H.R. 6784: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=08RlNZWqQJ6zBH576Qu8Qw

We only have this week to act. We can’t abandon wolves to the mercy of hostile states. If we lose this fight, wolves will pay with their lives. We’re counting on wildlife lovers like you to stand with us right now and speak up for wolves while we still can.

It only takes a moment: stop this destructive bill today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=1hvTx1bJ-J9ICtXjQOuv_g

  1. USA: Hope for the Red Wolf?

Today through December, we’ll be sharing uplifting wildlife news stories with you on a weekly basis. As wildlife champions, we need to remember that no matter how bad things seem to be, we still have reasons to hold out hope.

Today I bring you good news that’s only two weeks old: a crucial court victory for the critically endangered red wolf.

Red wolves (Canis lupus rufus) once inhabited forests and mountains across the Southeastern United States, from Pennsylvania to Texas. But generations of extermination campaigns and habitat loss due to human expansion devastated red wolf populations.

In 1980, red wolves were declared extinct in the wild. Hope for the species lay with a small number of captive red wolves. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) launched an all-out effort to rescue these wolves and reintroduce them to the wild.

In 1987, the first captive-bred red wolves were released into North Carolina’s Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Wolf populations grew. By 2000, nearly 100 wolves roamed the countryside in and around the refuge.

It was shaping up to be one of the most spectacular wildlife recovery stories in history.

But in recent years, under pressure from landowners and politicians, FWS all but abandoned the program. They proposed reducing the wolves’ recovery area by 90%. And they gave blanket permission for landowners to kill any red wolf that wandered onto their property.

The population plummeted. Now only about 24 red wolves survive in the wild.

In the face of this betrayal of wildlife, Defenders and our allies had to act. We joined our partner organizations and went to court to hold FWS accountable to do its job and resume sincere efforts to promote red wolf recovery.

And it worked. Earlier this month, a federal court ruled in the wolves’ favor and ordered FWS to get back to work, as the Endangered Species Act requires. When we fight and win to protect wildlife protection laws, we save lives. But the fight to restore America’s red wolves will continue.

Your support has been essential to all our efforts, including lawsuits, to protect the wildlife you love. We will continue to fight for red wolves, in court and on the ground. As long as there’s a single mated pair of red wolves in the wild, there’s hope.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

Germany: Three federal states want to shoot Wolves – please complain to the EU!

Saxony, Lower Saxony and Brandenburg have submitted an application to the Federal Assembly to allow future wolf shootings, which also includes a change to the Federal Nature Conservation Act. If that is approved it will be a violation of EU law and a first step towards the renewed extirpation of our wolves.

You can find our letter of objection with a detailed explanation and the original application here.

Please complain to EU Commissioner Karmenu Vella by mail to:

cab-karmenu-vella-contact@ec.europa.eu

  1. USA: 2019 Appropriations Bill Does Not (Directly) Target the Mexican Gray Wolf!

As reported on previously, Section 117 of the 2019 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill would require the USFWS to delist the Gray Wolf nationwide, and included within this rider is Subsection 2, which states:

“Shall not affect the inclusion of the subspecies classified as the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) of the species gray wolf (Canis lupus) in such list.”

Here is a link to the current text of the bill: https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/6147/text

The wording of this section is confusing, and a previous petition update questioned what this language means for the Mexican Gray Wolf – mainly, will it delist the subspecies or not? We finally have an answer from a reliable source: according to the Wolf Conservation Center, that confusing section is basically saying that the Mexican Gray Wolf is exempt from the rider and will not be delisted – thank goodness!

The 2019 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill was passed by the Senate last month, and negotiations between the House and the Senate are ongoing. Please write to President Trump and tell him to not sign the bill into law until the Gray Wolf delisting rider is removed from it, because while it does not directly target the Mexican Gray Wolf, it will indirectly harm the subspecies! Here is his contact: https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/

2. USA: Congress Orders Study of Mexican Gray Wolf Taxonomy.

So apparently, when Congress passed the must-pass budget bill back in March, they did add a wolf provision into it – but it wasn’t a delisting rider as we all feared. Rather, it was an order to determine whether the Mexican Gray Wolf is a taxonomically valid subspecies or not.

In compliance with the order, the USFWS hired the The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct the taxonomic study, which began last month and continues until March 2019. You can learn more about the study and keep updated on its meetings with the provided link.

Now in of itself, a scientific review of Mexican Gray Wolf taxonomy is not a bad thing – science works by constantly reviewing and revising its theories as new data comes in, and taxonomy is no exception to this rule. But there are two things about this order to review Mexican Gray Wolf taxonomy that seem a little suspicious:

  1. The order limits this taxonomic study to the two most endangered wolves in North America: the Mexican Gray Wolf and the Red Wolf (Canis rufus); it does not include all North American wolves, despite the fact that other Gray Wolf subspecies are in great need of taxonomic review.
  2. The status of the Mexican Gray Wolf as being genetically distinct from other Gray Wolves (regardless of whether it is called a subspecies or an ecotype) is more or less scientifically unquestioned, and the anti-wolf belief that the Mexican Gray Wolf is a wolf-dog hybrid has been disproven with genetic research.

So what do you think? Is this order to study Mexican Gray Wolf taxonomy the result of genuine scientific interest, or is Congress just making a political attempt to delist the Mexican Gray Wolf?

In any case, we must keep an eye on this to make sure that politics does not intervene with the scientists’ research. And if Congress tries to use/twist the study to strip the Mexican Gray Wolf of its ESA protections, then we must stop them!

  1. Proposed Amendment to “Manage Our Wolves Act” will Delist Mexican Gray Wolves!

Arizona Representative Andy Biggs has proposed an amendment to the “Manage Our Wolves Act” that will delist the Mexican Gray Wolf (the bill currently excludes the subspecies from the nationwide Gray Wolf delisting).

Here is a link to the text of the amendment: https://amendments-rules.house.gov/amendments/BIGGS_136_xml111318163707377.pdf

The House of Representatives is going to hold a vote on the “Manage Our Wolves Act” this Friday! If you live in the USA, then please write to your Congressmen/Congresswomen & tell them to both reject Bigg’s anti-lobo amendment and to vote NO on this dangerous anti-wolf bill! The fate of the Mexican Gray Wolf depends on it!

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE September 1-30, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign upto receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On September 5, the USFWS hosted an Executive Committee meeting in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Representatives from the Lead Agencies and Cooperating Entities attended, as well as representatives from the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF). The Executive Committee meets at least twice a year to discuss actions and resources necessary for the recovery and management of Mexican wolves.

On September 27 and 28, representatives from the AZGFD, NMDGF, and USFWS met with government officials from Mexico’s National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP by its Spanish acronym) and with Mexican biologists to discuss Mexican wolf recovery in the United States and Mexico.

Numbering System: Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups. At the end of September, there were 75 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared M1338 and f1683)

In September, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR and the FAIR. Yearling f1683, M1676, and AM1338 were documented travelling separately. Subadult male 1676 made dispersal movements across the central and western portion of the ASNF and on the Coconino National Forest, and was located dead in September. The incident is under investigation.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In September, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory this month within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In September, M1477 continued to be documented travelling with an uncollared wolf. The pair has been holding a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671, and fp1697)

In September, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. A female pup, fp1697, was captured, collared, and released in September.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1677, m1681, and mp1789)

In September, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. A male pup, mp1789, was captured, collared and released in September.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

Panther Creek AM1382 was not located during the month of September.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, AF1562, and fp1794)

In September, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. A female pup, fp1794, was captured, collared and released in September.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, mp1790, and fp1791)

In September, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences. Two pups, mp1790 and fp1791, were captured, collared, and released in September.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, m1680, and fp1792)

In September, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Two pups, fp1792 and mp1793, were captured, collared, and released in September. Later in the month, mp1793 was found dead. This incident is under investigation. The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache for the Saffel pack in an effort to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In September, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In September, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In September, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In September, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In September, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AF1283 and f1674)

In September, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In September, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During September, the Copper Creek Pack was located via a remote camera travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF). Currently, there are no functioning collars in this pack. Single M1673 was documented travelling with F1444 in September.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354 and AF1456)

During September, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the GNF. The Dark Canyon Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during September.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During September, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AM1447, AF1443, and fp1702)

During September, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. The IFT maintained a food cache near the den to support cross-fostered pups and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict. A female pup, fp1702, was captured, collared, and released in September.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During September, F1437 returned to the Hawks Nest territory in the north central portion of the GNF. AM1038 was not located in September. The IFT is trying to document if this pair is still travelling together.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, M1556, f1670, fp1721, and m1821)

During September, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. The Iron Creek Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during September. Wolves fp1721, m1821, and M1556 were captured, collared, and released in September.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285 and AF1405)

During September, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During September, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and f1684)

During September, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1664, and f1705)

During September, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. The Mangas Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups within their traditional territory during September.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During September, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack and implemented continuous hazing efforts to reduce potential for conflict with livestock. The Prieto Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups within their traditional territory during September.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During September, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT discontinued the diversionary food cache for the San Mateo Pack. The breeding female (AF1399) was captured, re-collared, and released in September.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During September, AF1553 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF. During September, M1561 was located dead in New Mexico. This incident is under investigation.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)

During September, the Squirrel Springs pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared M1486

During September, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1673

During September, M1673 was located via a remote camera travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF) with F1444 in August. The IFT continued monitoring efforts to determine if M1673 has joined the Copper Creek Pack.

MORTALITIES

During the month of September, M1676 of the Bear Wallow Pack and mp1793 of the Saffel Pack were located dead in Arizona. Male 1561 of the SBP Pack was located dead in New Mexico during September. The incidents are all under investigation.

From January 1, 2018 to September 30, 2018 there have been a total of 11 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of September, there were four confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There was one nuisance incident in September. From January 1, 2018 to September 30, 2018 there have been a total of 58 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 26 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On September 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow and calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation concluded the cow and calf were a confirmed wolf kill.

On September 8, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation concluded the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On September 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation concluded the cause of death was unknown.

On September 14, the IFT took a nuisance report involving wolves on the ASNF near Lee Valley Reservoir. The reporting party told the IFT he had four bird dogs running 200 to 300 yards away from him when he observed a pack of eight wolves moving toward his dogs. The dog handler called his dogs back to his location and the wolves followed the dogs to within 20 yards of the dog handler and his truck. The dog handler stated the wolves’ attention was focused on the dogs and indicated the wolves appeared startled when they saw him and his wife at which point the wolves retreated to a distance of 50 to 60 yards. The dog handler stated the wolves remained barking and howling for approximately 10 minutes. The dog handler stated he did not make any efforts to haze or scare the wolves away during this time. There was no physical interaction between the dogs and the wolves.

The IFT investigated the incident and determined the Saffel Pack had GPS collar locations in the area of the incident on September 14. It is not uncommon for wolves to interact with dogs even when people are present. Wolves will often exhibit aggressive behaviour toward dogs when young pups are present with the pack, as was the case with the Saffel Pack in this incident. Yelling at, throwing sticks and rocks in the direction of wolves and scaring wolves away from an area are all allowable forms of opportunistic harassment (under the Final 10(j) Rule), provided that the wolves are not purposefully sought out to harass. The IFT encourages members of the public to report all interactions when wolves display unacceptable behaviour using the contact information provided at the beginning of this document. Any person may take (which includes killing as well as nonlethal actions such as harassing or harming) a Mexican wolf in self-defence or defence of the lives of others. Any form of take must be reported within 24 hours to the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, USFWS by telephone 505-346-2525; or fax 505-346-2542.

On September 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation concluded the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On September 28, WMAT investigated a dead cow on the FAIR. The investigation concluded the cow died from unknown causes.

On September 29, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation concluded the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On September 29, Wildlife Services investigated a second dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation concluded the calf was killed by coyotes.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On September 26, USFWS participated in a panel discussion at the Association of Zoos and Aquariums’ Annual Conference in Seattle, Washington. The discussion was entitled “Keys to Successful Reintroduction – Beyond the Biology.”

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail10.atl261.mcdlv.net) on behalf of; Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Public Overwhelmingly Opposes Feds’ Plan to Nearly Wipe Out Wild Red Wolves in North Carolina

Public Comments Show Overwhelming Support for Red Wolf Recovery

99.9% of Submitted Comments Support Red Wolf Conservation

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s proposal to remove protections from the nation’s only wild population of endangered red wolves has been met with near unanimous opposition from the public.

In June, USFWS solicited public comments on its proposal and out of 108,124 comments submitted, 107,988 comments (99.9 %) favoured the need for strong federal protections for red wolves.

“Americans overwhelmingly support the Red Wolf Recovery Program,” said Maggie Howell, Executive Director of the Wolf Conservation Center. “We’re counting on the Service to take notice and follow the best available science to ensure that the world’s most endangered wolves remain a living, breathing part of the landscape in eastern North Carolina.”

USFWS’s proposal to reduce the red wolf recovery area by nearly 90%, limit the population to just 10-15 wolves, and allow landowners to kill wolves who stray beyond the newly-designated recovery area is a recipe for extinction.

USFWS’s decision is slated to be finalized by Nov. 30.

Volunteers from the Wolf Conservation Center, Wildlands Network, the Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, and the Animal Welfare Institute each reviewed thousands of comments submitted to produce this analysis.

More about the analysis here.

2. House Bill Seeks to Remove Federal Protections For Gray Wolves Nationwide 

If passed into law, wolves will die at the hands of trophy hunters.
The U.S. House this week is expected to vote on a controversial bill that would legislatively remove federal Endangered Species Act protections for all gray wolves in the lower 48 states except the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf.
In addition to stripping protections for most gray wolves from the federal endangered species list, H.R. 6784, the so-called “Manage our Wolves Act” from Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wis.), prohibits its judicial review thus preventing any legal challenge.
Science, not Congress, should be the decision maker when it comes to endangered and threatened species. Please urge your representative to stand up for wolves, the Endangered Species Act, and the rule of law by opposing H.R. 6784.

Take action now.

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Fact Check: Are Wolves Ruthless Killing Machines?

By Rick Lamplugh

A common criticism by those who dislike wolves is that wolves are ruthless killing machines compelled by instinct to take whatever prey crosses their path. To check the reality of this, I dove into the writings of several well-respected wolf experts. It turns out that wolves are discriminating hunters; they have to be since they are not well equipped for hunting big prey. Wolves choose “weaker and naive animals and have their greatest success” with elk calves and older elk, writes Jim Halfpenny, an eminent naturalist and author of Yellowstone Wolves in the Wild.

But getting dinner is not easy—can even be deadly—and most hunts are unsuccessful. Yellowstone wolves, for example, only succeed 21% of the time, according to David Mech and Rolf Peterson, renowned wolf biologists writing in the book Wolves Behavior, Ecology, and Conservation. “In no case, can a wolf merely walk up and kill a healthy ungulate that is more than a few days old.”

In Yellowstone the average female elk killed by wolves is about 14 years old, writes Halfpenny. By that age the elk’s teeth are worn down and less effective. This means the animal does not get proper nourishment and is weaker and more vulnerable to attack.

How do the wolves find a vulnerable animal? “Wolves stalk just like a house cat does,” writes Halfpenny. Wolves want to get as close as possible to an elk herd before starting a chase. Once the chase begins, the wolves sort and sift the herd trying to find a weak animal, one less likely to harm them. Wolves are risk averse and by chasing a herd, may detect a male that has been weakened by defending his females during the rut. Or they may separate a calf from the protection of the herd. Or they may find an animal that is diseased, has been injured, or was born with an abnormality.

But wolves also attack healthy animals, even big male elk with dangerous hooves and antlers. Wolves have a tactic that can turn that healthy elk into a vulnerable one: They attack the elk and before the animal can drive them off, they bite it as many times as possible. Those wounds cause blood loss. “Wounded animals,” writes Halfpenny, “seldom travel far, and wounded animals stiffen up, especially during long cold nights. A previously unbeatable foe may now be an easy target.”

Whether the prey is healthy or vulnerable, wolves are not well equipped for bringing down big animals. A wolf’s skeleton is not built for killing, write Dan MacNulty, Dan Stahler, and Doug Smith in Yellowstone Science. A wolf’s skull is not designed to deliver a killing bite. A wolf’s front-most teeth are all it has for grabbing prey and those teeth wear out with age. A wolf’s jaw cannot be locked when biting prey. A wolf—unlike a cougar and grizzly bear—doesn’t have the right kind of claws and forelimbs for gripping prey. Finally, a wolf’s hunting ability decreases with age; the best hunters are two to three years old. (The average Yellowstone wolf lives to be four or five. Outside the park the average life span is two to three years.)

To reduce risks and overcome their shortcomings, wolves hunt in packs. Packs with four wolves are more successful than packs with fewer wolves when hunting elk. To take down a bison, a pack needs three times that many members.

Wolves are far from being ruthless killing machines. Wolves know they can die trying to dine, so they look for prey that is less dangerous. But even when they find such prey, wolves fail far more often than they succeed.

Rick’s award-winning Deep into Yellowstone and best-selling In the Temple of Wolves are available signed or unsigned on Amazon.

Rick’s new book, The Wilds of Agingis available signed or on Amazon.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 155

Element Pack

by Taren a Werewolf Mage.

Her black fur gleamed in the dim moonlight, and her vermillion eyes produced a light of their own.

“I am wolf of Shadow.”

She sang to the stars. The howl carried down wind, and over miles of mountain terrain. Far away the pack heard her. The ivory alpha male uplifted his great, shaggy head. His title ringing back to her,

“I am wolf of Ice.”

The black wolves hackles raised, and a snarl escaped her throat. She would not return to them. Miles away, the alpha hung his head. Sorry for his loss. A lesser wolf tried to persuade the shadow wolf. His golden fur gleaming.

“I am wolf of Light. Will you not return?”

The shadow wolf spat,

“Never again shall you see me.”

She hated Light wolf, her elemental enemy. The packs omega tried, silver fur sparkling.

“I am wolf of Wind. Please come to us!”

The she-wolf snapped,

“Coward Wind wolf! I should never return for your sake! For one wolf’s sake alone will I come.”

The pack stood puzzled for a moment, confused of what she meant. They had tried Ice wolf, who was bravest. Used Light wolf, who was strongest. And even Wind wolf, the most attractive. They were desperate for their lifelong companion. Brown Earth wolf called to no avail, and jet blue Wave wolf sang loudly. But no Shadow wolf appeared. Tan Poison wolf screamed his highest, and only received insults.

“Who.” pleaded Ice wolf, “can bring our female back?”

Then shy, silent, humble reddish Flame wolf meekly slunk forward,

“I’ll try.”

He howled long and loud, his deep soothing voice a joy to behold. He stopped and sighed, a silence falling over the ridge. And then loud as thunder, clear as crystal Shadow wolf replied,

“I am coming, wait for me Flame wolf.”

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Nothing to report this month

Will be continued…

 

 

Volume 13, Issue 168, October 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 168, October 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

Less than ten weeks to go to another festive (crazy) season. Can you believe it? What happened to 2018?

This month’s news section is again dominated by the human threat to wolves. Curious that the US state of Washington’s plans to abandon the death penalty for criminal humans coincide with a drive to implement the death penalty for wolves whose only crime it is to exist and live according to their nature.

The same section this time includes an account of a hunter facing off with a pack of wolves (under California Wolf Center’s Mexican Wolf Update), which is rather interesting.

Our Wolves and Wolfdogs section features a personal experience with an anti-tick remedy that may have severe consequences if a canine contracts tickbite fever nevertheless and needs veterinary treatment. The animal concerned (barely) survived all right, but it could just as well have turned out differently. We particularly value contributions like this one, as they help greatly with spreading the word about vital details very few non-vets are aware of!

We have a poetic wolf tale, as usual, and I was surprised to find that it in part uses elements my book is all about, entirely independent from it and not at all influenced by it. The author very probably doesn’t even know my book exists.

Erin reports on our most memorable meeting with one of the very rare people who really do support wolf welfare physically. In this conjunction, I would like to urge you to take note of the small ad for a wolf care volunteer programme in SA under News: National, especially if you are situated outside of South Africa.

500 x 50 – We continue to talk about this initiative to just about anybody who will listen and continue to get the same response: it is a brilliant idea to sustainably support a really worthwhile cause. See our note under News: National and check whether R 50 would really harm your budget more than it would make you feel good about donating them every month anew. And if you are still doubtful about the beneficiaries, meet them face to face and those who care for them in Reitz, maybe when you go on holiday this coming holiday season.

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more  here

 

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

 

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

 

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

Extracts from the HuskyRomi Newsletter September 2018

From the Sanctuary

What a month this has been. So much has happened, so many changes and new happenings. Frans contacted me regarding a meeting that we were going to have regarding the NPO steering committee for HuskyRomi. Frans as per usual made some very sound suggestions regarding the structure of the committee, notably that I was no longer to be the chairperson of HuskyRomi, I would continue as the Sanctuary Manager. He felt that I wasn’t being able to do what I really like doing and that is looking after my animals and as per usual he was right.

The new committee can be looked up in our latest September newsletter.

HuskyRomi has grown so much that the committee had to grow and with the growth we have our first R10 000.00 a month sponsor. Paragmed has also committed a substantial amount of money towards the marketing of HuskyRomi. Glenda and Gary, on behalf of all the voiceless ones out here I would like to thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

Yes, we are looking for a secretary, someone who is based in Gauteng as meetings will take place in Jo’burg. Kim Dijkman will be setting up a HuskyRomi office in Holland, looking for donors, volunteers to come and volunteer (read volunteering on our Facebook page [or farther down here]) at the sanctuary.

FORRAY 65: Please read a very interesting article about Forray 65, a vet product to kill Redwater (Babesiosis) and tick-borne Gallsickness (Anaplasmosis) organisms in cattle, but also in canines and equine Babesiosis, based on Larry’s experience farther down in the column Wolves and Wolfdogs.

Frans’ Ramblings

Well, it seems like winter has come and gone and in contrary to what I predicted earlier this year looking at the extremely thick coats the wolves were growing, we never even had frost here. At the moment of course, it is time for them to get rid of the excess fur again and that is quite a hairy disaster as anybody with a moulting dog in the house can tell you. Now imagine two moulting long haired wolves!

Talking about moulting, I have learned something today that is quite possibly just another piece of useless, but nonetheless interesting, information at Wikipedia regarding the definition of moulting in dogs. Please read this in our latest September newsletter.

Unfortunately it does not work like that with the balding pattern my head is following!

That is all I’m going to bore you with this month. Please take care and remember to send Larry articles and snippets for inclusion in the newsletter.

Throw your heads back and keep howling.

Frans.

News from the Shire

A huge thank you to each and everyone who supported the Medieval Fayre and the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary stall in particular. An amount of R 2 000+ was raised during the day.

The next upcoming event will be Mutters Dog Day. Thank you to the event organizers, Alter Ego’s, for choosing HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary as one of the charities of the day. Have a look at the Mutters Dog Day FB page for further details. An amount of each entrance ticket sold will be divided between the charities.

https://www.facebook.com/events/569317123483390/

This most likely will be the last news from the Shire. It is with a heavy heart that I say good bye to a very important part of my life for the past 7 years.

The sanctuary and animals were there for me in bad and good times. This past year especially was one of the most difficult ones that I had to face. Personally, financially and emotionally and the roller coaster and uncertainties continue. My involvement and love for the animals and the sanctuary have kept me busy and sane. Through it all I have realized once again that you will only get true loyalty from animals.

I just want to wish the new committee all the best.

But I will keep my commitments to stall events already in place.

If you have an idea how to raise some extra money or if you want to run a fundraiser event please contact Larry to discuss it further.

Please remember to swipe your My School card!

I leave a big part of my soul behind at the sanctuary and I love each and every animal there unconditionally, even though I couldn’t visit as much this past two years. Thank you also for the true friends that I made during the years!

Please keep on supporting the sanctuary and I only wish bigger and better things for the growth and living conditions of all the animals.

Till we meet again!

That’s all from me.

Nolia

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

 

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

 

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

 

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Help us fight for Washington wolves!

Washington State has signed death warrants for two young wolves from a pack so new it doesn’t even have a name.

The tragic irony is that these killings will do little if anything for the livestock the state officials is trying to protect, as a growing body of research shows that lethal methods are often ineffective, counterproductive and create more problems.

These wolves don’t have to die.

Donate $10 or more and your urgent gift will help us fight for the lives of these wolves and other wildlife and help Defenders promote proven nonlethal strategies here

The decision to execute these animals comes in the wake of a handful of attacks by wolves on livestock in eastern Washington State on national forest public lands, near the Idaho border.

Elke, this ‘kill first, ask questions later’ approach is not only senseless, it’s also ineffective. This specific area of eastern Washington has been the site of repeated wolf-livestock conflicts, and instead of requiring ranchers to adapt their practices to implement more effective conflict deterrent methods, WDFW is allowing wolves to be killed off.

Please make a donation of $10 or more here

Thanks to your past support, Defenders is on the ground in wolf country every day. Defenders of Wildlife has extensive experience in promoting and implementing effective nonlethal methods to reduce conflicts between wolves and livestock throughout the country.

We have pioneered creative and effective strategies to allow humans, predators and other wildlife to share the landscape. Because if we’re not coexisting with wolves, we’re condemning wolves.

With your continued support of $10 or more, we’ll continue to educate landowners and state officials that peaceful coexistence is possible: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=HzvO3H2l_b3q2MU39xK8IQ

It’s the best hope for continued wolf recovery.

Thank you for all you do.

  1. USA: A nation abandoning wolves?

With one bill, Congress could unleash the widespread killing of northern Grey wolves across the country.

Members of Congress have introduced a bill that would leave most gray wolves at the mercy of the states. And you and I have seen where that can lead: Dead wolves.

This bill has already advanced in Congress – but we are coming out strong to stop this deadly legislation from going any further.

Won’t you help? Your emergency gift will help save wolves and other imperiled species: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=SN_s0HTcwk8V6zfNTtFiqg

This hateful bill, H.R. 6784, is called the “Manage Our Wolves Act.” A more accurate title would be the “Open Season on Wolves Act,” because it takes a brutal approach to ‘managing’ wolves by:

  • Stripping wolves of all protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA);
  • Turning most wolf ‘management’ over to the states; and
  • Eliminating the right to go to court to fight for the wolves you and I love.

What does ‘state wolf management’ mean?

In Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, thousands of wolves have been killed since losing ESA protection. And we’ve seen some of Yellowstone National Park’s most iconic and beloved wolves shot and killed just across the park border.

And don’t forget Alaska, where not even a denning mother and her pups are safe.

We’ve come a long way toward seeing wolves recover in the lower 48. But we’ve got a long way to go. If this bill passes, wolf recovery could stop dead in its tracks.

With all of the other attacks underway, including efforts to gut the ESA, anti-wildlife forces think they have the upper hand. But they don’t. Not if wildlife lovers like you refuse to surrender to the assault.

I’m counting on you today!

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here

  1. Germany: More Shootings of Wolves planned in Görlitz County! Please help!

The next wolf is in the crosshairs of the county administration in Görlitz county in Saxony. After Pumpak, whose killing could be prevented but who has been missing since, and Zottel who could have been treated with two available types of medication, a new firing order is about to be issued on another wolf. According to our research, it is again anything but legal.

You can read all the facts here

 

From Change.org (Jan Olsson via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

  1. The fight for the Survival of Wolves! Pleading for Wolves!

Illegal and “legal” shootings of wolves have happened and do happen these days in Lower Saxony, Saxony, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Brandenburg.

Municipal, city, county, provincial and federal politicians still call vehemently for the death of the Goldenstedt she-wolf and others. Regional as well as national media are still involved in spreading assumptions and allegations cloaked as unsubstantiated facts in a drive to disseminate diffuse and unfounded fears about wolves. These biased reports are intended to rally support for the shooting of the Goldenstedt she-wolf, her partner, her offspring, and other wolves!

At least one wolf of every pack in Saxony is to be fitted with a transmitter. Presently there are 20 officially confirmed packs in Lower Saxony, which means at least 20 wolves. The only two wolves with transmitters in Lower Saxony were MT6 (Kurti) and his sister FT10, and they and their cubs are dead. That must not happen again!

Please, help prevent the deaths of more wolves by supporting our petition and the W-I-S-Z-V. Appeal to the political representatives of the parties and media in your region and report to them and the public the true behaviour of wolves. Show to all others responsible and representatives of organisations and public authorities that you are FOR the wolf and that you will not tolerate more killed wolves!

Everyone can make a difference! Everyone plays a big part in the protection of wolves. Our wolves need your help! Keep supporting the W-I-S-Z-V; each donation no matter how small goes directly to the protection of the Goldenstedt she-wolf and others. The W-I-S-Z-V published in their latest news of 5 October 2018 a “Pleading for the Wolves” that illustrates the situation of our wolves in detail. You can also find there all important information about the topic Wolf and what it means to lobbing for the wolves every day.

Account details:

Wolf-Informations-und Schutz-Zentrum-Vechta e.V. (W-I-S-Z-V)

Commerzbank Vechta
IBAN DE74 2804 2865 0630 0719 00
BIC COBADEFFXXX

You find more information at: https://www.w-i-s-z-v.de/

 

From News by the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE August 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf . For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH .

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

Brady McGee has been selected for the USFWS Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator position. Brady will start in his new position October 1st. For the last four years, Brady has served as the USFWS Southwest Region’s Chief for the Branch of Recovery and Restoration. Overall, he has worked in the Southwest Region since 2001 and has extensive experience with the Endangered Species Act, Mexican wolves and the challenges of wolf recovery in the Southwest. Brady has a Masters in Wildlife Biology from Texas State University and a Doctorate degree in Wildlife Science from Texas Tech University.

Numbering System: Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups. At the end of August, there were 70 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, M1676, and f1683)

In August, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR. Yearling f1683, M1676, and AM1338 were documented travelling separately. Subadult male 1676 made dispersal movements across the central and western portion of the ASNF and on the Coconino National Forest.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In August, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory this month within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In August, M1477 continued to be documented travelling with an uncollared wolf. The pair has been holding a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, and m1671)

In August, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT discontinued a supplemental food cache that had been established for the pack as part of the cross-foster effort in April. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of August.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677, and m1681)

In August, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT discontinued a diversionary food cache that had been established for the pack in May. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of August. The IFT documented a minimum of three pups in the Hoodoo Pack this month.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

In August, the IFT documented AM1382 travelling alone and making dispersal movements throughout the north central portion of the ASNF.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394 and AF1562)

In August, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of August.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471 and AF1488)

In August, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. AM1471 and AF1488 exhibited behaviour and movements consistent with pup rearing. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)

In August, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of August. The IFT documented a minimum of five pups in the Saffel Pack this month.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In August, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In August, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF and in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared M1574

In August, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)

In August, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In August, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and f1674)

In August, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In August, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During August, the Copper Creek Pack was located via a remote camera travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF). Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack. Single M1673 was documented travelling with F1444 in August. The IFT is monitoring this to determine if M1673 has joined this pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354 and AF1456)

During August, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF). The Dark Canyon Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during August.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During August, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AM1447 and AF1443)

In August, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict. The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during August.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During August, the Hawks Nest Pack continued to travel separately. AM1038 continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF, while F1437 was consistently located with its natal pack (Elk Horn) in Arizona.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During August, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. The Iron Creek Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during August.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285 and AF1405)

During August, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF. The Lava Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during August.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During August, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During August, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The Luna Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during August.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1664 and f1705)

During August, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The Mangas Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups within their traditional territory during August.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During August, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack and implemented continuous hazing efforts to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The Prieto Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups within their traditional territory during August.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During August, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the San Mateo Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The San Mateo Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during August.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553 and M1561)

During August AF1553, of the SBP Pack and single M1561 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF. The wolves continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with rearing pups.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)

In August the Squirrel Springs pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared M1486

During August, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1673

During August, M1673 was located via a remote camera travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF) with F1444 in August. The IFT is monitoring to determine if M1673 has joined the Copper Creek Pack.

MORTALITIES

In August, AM1343 of the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located dead in Arizona. This mortality is under investigation.

In August, fp1691 of the Elk Horn Pack was located dead in New Mexico. The mortality is currently under investigation.

From January 1, 2018 to August 31, 2018 there have been a total of eight documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of August, there were two confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were two nuisance incidents during August. From January 1, 2018 to August 31, 2018 there have been a total of 56 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 24 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On August 3, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Coconino County, AZ. The investigation concluded the cow died from unknown causes.

On August 7, Wildlife Services investigated an injured dog in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined it was probable the injuries were caused by another dog.

On August 8, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On August 13, WMAT investigated a dead calf on the FAIR. The investigation determined the calf was a probable dog kill.

The IFT received information from a property manager who stated on August 16, a woman was sitting on a porch at a cabin located off Highway 191 north of Hannagan Meadow when a collared wolf approached the cabin and started to walk up the porch steps. The woman stood up and yelled at the wolf which caused the wolf to run off. The wolf reportedly was seen trying to enter a barn before leaving the property. The property manager told the IFT that on the following day, a single collared wolf was again observed on the property. The manager walked outside and yelled at the wolf from a distance of approximately 50 yards, causing the wolf to run away. The manager told the IFT that the property had been unoccupied for months prior to the week in mid-August when these incidents occurred. At the time of preparing this report, the property manager told the IFT there had been no further sightings of wolves at the property.

On August 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

The IFT took a report from a hunter who reported an encounter with a wolf pack on August 29, while hunting in the ASNF south of Alpine. The hunter told the IFT that he was deer hunting on foot in the early morning when he was surrounded by wolves approximately 100 yards away. The hunter reported that the wolves were growling, barking and moving back and forth. The hunter stated there were as many as nine to ten wolves. The hunter left the area to return to his vehicle and indicated the wolves followed him out. GPS collar data was used by the IFT to determine the encounter reported by the hunter was with the Prime Canyon Pack which consists of two adult wolves and a minimum of six pups from this year. The IFT concluded the hunter’s encounter with the Prime Canyon Pack was a result of the hunter walking into a rendezvous site where the alpha wolves exhibited behaviours to protect the pups that were present. Wolves vocalizing and following a perceived threat out of an area where young pups are present is a behaviour often exhibited by wolves.

After taking the report, the IFT posted informational signs and has maintained a presence in the area. At the time this report was prepared, there have been no additional incidents reported to the IFT involving interactions with the Prime Canyon Pack. The public is encouraged to report all wolf interactions to the IFT using the contact information provided at the beginning of this document. Any person may take (which includes killing as well as nonlethal actions such as harassing or harming) a Mexican wolf in self-defence or defence of the lives of others. Any form of take must be reported within 24 hours to the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, USFWS by telephone 505-346-2525; or fax 505-346-2542.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On August 15, WMAT presented at the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society Conference in Ignacio, CO.

On August 11, AGFD personnel had an informational booth about wolves at the Show Low Chamber of Commerce Outdoor Expo in Show Low, AZ.

On August 27 and 28, the IFT and a group of wildlife program personnel from the Navajo Nation completed annual capture and immobilization training in Springerville, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In August, WMAT welcomed a temporary employee.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of state law and the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail10.atl261.mcdlv.net) on behalf of; Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: A Heartfelt Goodbye to Atka

Rest in Peace, Atka

It is with deep sorrow that we share news about the most magnificent wolf we have ever known. Atka died in his sleep early this morning; he was 16 years old.
His passing was painless and peaceful with his family surrounding him. While Atka leaves a hole in our lives so big that words can’t describe it, his impact on wolf conservation persists and can not be overstated.
Atka is an Inuit name meaning guardian spirit, and his brilliant spirit lives on in those whose hearts he warmed, minds he opened, and souls he touched.
He instilled compassion, understanding, and awareness to the hundreds of thousands of people he met over his storied career. We will be better and do better because Atka lived. He will empower us to continue the fight to safeguard the wild legacy he leaves behind.
Thank you, Atka. We’ll never stop loving you.

Thank you so much for your support,
Wolf Conservation Center Family

 

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

Nothing to report

 

Wolves and Wolfdogs

A not-so-safe Tick and Biliary Remedy – Forray 65

by Larry from the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

I’ve always used Forray 65 in the past as it was recommended by my vet. When I took Apache with a suspicion of biliary through to Bethlehem, I told the veterinary nurse what I had treated him with. At the very mention of Forray, she looked at me in horror and said, they can’t treat him. I said please just check his blood and confirm biliary. She did what she could and put Apache on a drip and wished me luck.

Everything seemed to be going well when suddenly Apache took a turn for the worse; now we were fighting for his life, messaged the nurse, and sent a video. She confirmed that we were losing him; we didn’t think that we could even get to Bethlehem in time. All of this was late in the evening, just after ten. She asked me if I had any Atropine; she had contacted another vet who suggested that we counteract the Forray as it was killing Apache. Thank goodness I do carry Atropine. I injected the dosage into the drip and the rest under his skin. Half an hour later Apache started to breathe easier, but Kim thought that maybe he was letting go. I slept on the floor next to him as every now and then he would have a convulsion but they became further apart. To cut a long story short, Apache had a blood transfusion using Trigger’s blood. The nurse had done a test the previous day combining the wolves blood with dogs blood and saw a huge rejection. Apache could be released back into his pack, all thanks to a dedicated nurse.

After losing our husky Max to biliary last month and then having to deal with Apache who showed all the same symptoms that took Max’s life, we were forced to take Apache through to Maluti Veterinary Hospital in Bethlehem. We had JC, the vet nurse attend to us; she was like a gift from above. Apache was moments

from death a few times and if it hadn’t been for the dedication of JC I don’t believe Apache would be here with us now. She changed a lot of what we have done in the past and we’ve since treated more animals for biliary in a different way and noticed a huge improvement.

[Ed.: …and we found the following background information: “One of 13 healthy dogs used in a pharmacokinetic study of imidocarb dipropionate died due to difficulty in breathing, tachycardia, weakness and profuse diarrhoea. Autopsy findings showed marked pulmonary congestion and oedema. Kidneys were grossly enlarged and markedly congested with extensive haemorrhage in the cortex and medulla. Marked tubulonephrosis was also exhibited microscopically. Liver and spleen were moderately enlarged and congested. The adverse effects of imidocarb may be due to excessive acetylcholine action.”

”Adverse effects of imidocarb dipropionate (Imizol) in a dog”, available from [accessed Oct 13 2018].]

 

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 154

The Black Alpha Wolf  by Sloane Jenssen

A big black Alpha-wolf climbs a hill in the fading light, so he can sing and howl throughout the coming night.

The dwindling sunlight plays on his eyes and face, as he stands there tall, a noble member of a dying race.

As the sun sets he lifts his head to sing, and his voice causes the very air to ring.

Away in the forest the wolf-pack picks up their Alpha’s song, and they all begin to howl together – loud and long.

Suddenly a gunshot sounds out through the night, and down goes the black wolf-leader without a fight.

Sprawled out on the hill, bleeding, life dims in his eyes, he shudders and whimpers, and finally he dies.

Then the human walks up the hill, his gun held high, looking down at the wolf with a satisfied sigh.

He kneels down, his heart swelling with pride, wondering how much money he’ll get for the wolf’s hide.

Then he takes the wolf away, an animal he holds but does not love, not noticing the Alpha-wolf’s spirit watching him from Above.

Now the night is quiet and silent and still, and no more wolf-cries sound from the hill.

Then the wolf’s pack creeps from the trees, their thick pelts rippling in the cool night breeze.

They run to the place where their Alpha was slain, but all they find on the grass is a big, red bloodstain.

Then the Alpha’s mate, her belly full of pups, begins a new song, about their loyal leader and of his that was so wrong.

All the wolves mournfully howl, then at last they go away, sad that their leader will not see the next day.

Yet that day is happier, for six wolf pups are born, and the Alpha-wolf’s mate ceases to mourn.

Two of the wolf pups are brown, and three are gray, soon they are playing about in the warm spring day.

But the sixth pup, who is jet black, is at the center of their play, growling and bossing them around in a very Alpha-like way.

He has the same noble look his father had once worn, and the wolf-pack realizes that a new leader has been born.

Now, years later, a new black Alpha stands atop the hill and cries, while the old one watches proudly from the Heavenly skies.

The young wolf-leader howls long, he boldly says: no matter what happens, there will be wolves here…always!

 

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Ted and I eventually had the pleasure to meet Kim, the former volunteer and now a regular member of the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary Team. On her way back to Holland she had a few days in Jozy and some time to pay us a visit. It was so nice to meet her in person for the first time (we so far only had contact via e-mail and phone), and what a nice person she is! Full of dedication to the sanctuary, the animals, and bubbling with new ideas and projects. After our having not been down to the sanctuary for way too long a time we could not wait to hear about everything that has happened since we were there the last time and how much everything has changed. We had first warned her that our pack was rather suspicious of strangers and that she might not see much of them, but to our surprise, all three seemed to feel quite comfortable in her presence and were rather forthcoming. Maybe the tins of pilchards in tomato sauce she had brought for them played a role in it?

The weather was nice and we could sit outside, chatting the day away. Time was flying much too fast. Eventually, she had to leave right when the clouds turned dark with rain and thunder for the first time this season. Unfortunately Kim will only be back next year, but we already have plans for when she is back, because the time we had together was much too short.

We were extremely pleased to hear that she would make good use of her time away and set up a HuskyRomi support office in Holland, looking for donors, volunteers to come to SA and work at the sanctuary (read our small advert in the National News section and see on the HuskyRomi Facebook page). All I can say from what I have heard about this new project is that it sounds very exciting and will surely be a very rewarding and worthwhile experience for every wolf lover here and in overseas.

Ted and I will go to the sanctuary in the too distant future, and Ted will sign his book (A Headful of Wolves) there for everybody who brings his/her copy. We will publish the exact date on Facebook as soon as we know it.

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 167, September 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 167, September 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

It’s early spring up here on the Highveld – finally. Even though this winter wasn’t as cold as some in earlier years by absolute minimum values, it was unusually persistent. I truly hope we will have seen the last of it!

Another month, another reason to get upset to outright furious about what is going on in the land of the extreme. It seems to be an inbred instinct over there that if a wolf pitches up anywhere, it must be killed. Best, it appears, to kill them all by whatever inhumane means. And while we are at it, we can just as well kill all natural predators, so that we can claim to be the only one left standing. “We” here of course means American. That much for a civilized first-world country.

Along pretty much the same lines, we have selected for this month’s issue an intriguing write-up on how lobbyists try to discredit scientific research by feeding in fake information. F@#& the Facts if there are other interests. Read what we have found for you on Mexican gray wolves.

A very sad poem sums it all up.

500 x 50 – Since the last newsletter went out, we have been talking to several of our friends, and look at this: they all think it is a brilliant idea to sustainably support a really worthwhile cause. Some set up standing orders the very same day! See our note under News: National and check whether R 50 would really harm your budget more than it would make you feel good about donating them every month anew. And if you are still doubtful about the beneficiaries, meet them face to face and those who care for them in Reitz, maybe when you go on holiday this coming crazy season.

Till next month,

Ed.

 

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more at here

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs  here

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

 

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

Extracts from the HuskyRomi Newsletter August 2018

From the Sanctuary

Life out here is pretty much the same as last month, the Isuzu is still not mechanically sound, but there is not much we can do about it, we just manage to keep it running. We have increased the size of the geriatrics enclosure. We have also removed all the electric fencing so that the oldtimers don’t get shocked by mistake.

Volunteer Program

This is in its final stages of completion. Kim has put a lot of effort into getting the room ready and we will be able to sleep four people down at the house. Thanks to Mandy Marshall for all the wonderful stuff that she brought down to help kickstart the project. A new toilet, paint for the bathroom and for the burglar bars and numerous other things.

Kim has bought a ton of linen for all the beds. It’s just so overwhelming with everything that is happening out here.

Frans’ Ramblings

As most of you know, I live with my wife, daughter, a Rottweiler and two wolves. I have the habit to take the rottie (Titus) and the wolves (Yiska and Wahya) for a walk in the neighbourhood almost every day that I can fit it into my schedule and because it is important to me, I literally make time to do it.

This morning while walking with Yiska (four year old Canadian Timber Wolf), I started thinking again about the Pretoria security company that acquired a number of wolves to train and use as security animals. I can only imagine what a disaster this will be and what would happen to the poor non co-operative wolves being forced into a working situation that they do not know how to comply to. Wolves are not dogs, and especially not guard dogs. Even Yiska and Wahya know that Titus is the one with the job portfolio of “guarding”. They will gladly retire into the living room watching through the window while he gives some possible threat walking past the gate a piece of his mind. Wahya (three year old Russian Tundra Wolf) is very territorial and plain scared and shy, especially of anybody and anything strange, even though he is a huge block of a canid. He easily retires to one of his personal “safe spots” in and around the house and we know where to look for him when he disappears.

Can you imagine animals with that type of independent personalities being forced into doing guard duty? When we actively started doing wolf rescues in 2014, two of the first re-homing’s we did were Ghost and Shadow, a brother and sister that were used as guard wolves at a powder coating paint yard on the East Rand. Apparently Ghost turned on and pinned down his handler one day and that was when we were called to please remove them. On your next visit to HuskyRomi, please ask Larry to point them out to you, go into the enclosure and experience this for yourself. He probably just did not want to do what the handler wanted him to do and resisted by pinning him down — nonsense. When I go for my walks with the animals, I have a couple of different routes around the neighbourhood that I usually follow, but I mostly allow the animal that I take out to choose for himself which way he feels inclined to walk on that specific day and then I just basically walk along. It is interesting how they choose a different route almost daily and very often also decide that they want to turn around rather than completing the course. I have learned the hard way that it is totally senseless to try and drag them along if they actually had enough and want to go home. That is their nature and how I allow them to live and I believe that they are happy and contented animals.

I do know of trained wolves being used as guide dogs, but I believe it is a very different situation to being used for guarding. All this said, I however also believe that if they should experience a direct threat to themselves or their pack (which would in our situation be us), they will stand their ground and protect as required, just like I would do it.

Throw your heads back and keep howling.

Frans.

News from the Shire

There are still a few pages left for sponsorship in the 2019 calendar. They will be the same format as this year, A3 hanging wall calendar with 13/14 pages. Even as a NPO we unfortunately don’t get printing for free so we are looking for sponsors or donations to help. You can sponsor a page for R500. For that you will receive a calendar for free as well as your logo or message printed on the page you sponsor. If you would like to donate or sponsor, please send a message to Nolia Meyer on FB, email nolia@pentasure.ws or whatsapp 0726221764. We plan to have the calendars ready by end of October.

Please also consider if you want to order five or more calendars, to put your order in now so that we can have it printed in one batch. We are only ordering a limited amount. The calendars will cost R120, discount on bulk orders.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

 

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Add your name: Help stop the cruel killing of wolf pups and bear cubs

Another outrage from the Trump Administration – and if we don’t act fast wolves and bears, including pups and cubs, could die.

Take action: Tell the Trump Administration you oppose brutal killing methods in national preserves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=wofWPGF1K54mMqHbs7er9A

Here’s what’s going on:

The National Park Service (NPS) has proposed lifting a ban on extreme killing methods on Park Service lands in Alaska. If the ban is removed, wolves, bears and other predators will be vulnerable to appalling and cruel killing methods that most people oppose.

The state of Alaska has made no secret of its intentions – they want to aggressively kill predators to artificially inflate populations of moose, caribou and other game animals.

Please take action to help imperilled wildlife: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=BCcFJUsqHmpK_PxhRgaUGg

If the Park Service follows through on its plan, it will be legal to kill wolves and pups and mother bears and their cubs in their dens. It will be legal to bait bears with donuts and garbage and shoot them when they come sniffing for it. It could even be legal to shoot caribou from motor boats while the animals are crossing rivers.

This is unacceptable – please call on NPS to protect bears and wolves in Alaska from extreme killing methods: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Gdyx9LRffIImWiqWjHlwsA

If the current proposal becomes final, the floodgates could open to a despicable wave of killing and death that shouldn’t happen anywhere, and especially not on America’s park lands.

Elke, your voice matters. If you love wildlife like I think you do, please take this action right now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=09-7e28hexukGVIEnvn5kg

Thanks for all you do.

  1. USA: These wolves don’t need to die

This young pack doesn’t even have a name – but just yesterday – the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) authorized the lethal removal of two wolves from this northeastern Washington pack.

Tell the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Director to rescind this decision to kill these wolves NOW: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=XT_6hoAOSZvjqzpOfKGv8w

While the decision to execute these animals comes in the wake of a handful of attacks by wolves on livestock, there are a number of proven nonlethal strategies that ranchers can use to adapt their operations to prevent or eliminate wolf attacks on livestock.

Please take immediate action: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=TtWjRInewb2Ve8rYHALfLg

This ‘kill first, ask questions later’ approach is not only senseless, it’s also ineffective. This specific area of eastern Washington has been the site of repeated wolf-livestock conflicts, and instead of requiring the rancher to adapt their practices to allow for coexistence, WDFW is allowing wolves to be killed off – this cannot continue!

Demand that the Washington Fish and Wildlife Director Kelly Susewind reverse this decision to kill wolves in this brand-new pack TODAY!

http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=8PGl2c_nMI4W-hofuNnX5Q

These wolves don’t have to die. Defenders is on the ground in Washington state implementing non-lethal control measures with proven results in protecting livestock and saving wolves. This new pack demonstrates that wolves are still regaining a foothold in Washington State. By killing them, the state is acting prematurely and the death of these wolves will not solve the problem.

Please take action today to save these wolves here

 

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here

Germany: Wolf News – always up-to-date and free!

Surveys have shown repeatedly that most people in Germany, Austria and Denmark are pro-wolf, but one lobby, consisting of livestock farmers who don’t want to protect, farmers associations and hunters, leave nothing untried to change public opinion, partly even with lies, and with the help of the media.

With our blog we have created an antipole. We offer the latest information about the wolf, unmask fake stories, and inspect the fences of livestock farmers who claim theirs to be safe, which in the most cases is not the case. They even provoke killings to underline their demand to shoot wolves. To counteract such practices information is needed that the media often don’t publish or even omit from their articles.

You can easily subscribe to our blog at www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de; scroll down on the right side and click on BLOG VIA E-MAIL ABONNIEREN. Fill in your email address and you will never again miss out on news.

  1. Please also help the wolves in Austria and sign this petition

Wolves in Austria are under pressure. They are supposed to be shot even before they had a chance of establishing themselves properly.

And that although the majority of people in Austria, like in Germany, are PRO wolf. There was an anti-wolf petition that was signed by about 3000 people. Let’s show friends of the wolves that we are the majority and please sign the petition here

 

From News by the California Wolf Center Mexican Wolf (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE July 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.   For information on the FAIR, call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoor.org.

Past updates may be viewed at these websites.  Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to:  the Alpine wolf office (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653.  For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 338-4385 ext. 226.  To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Updates

On July 12 and 13, the annual meeting of the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) was hosted by the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois.  The SSP oversees management of the Mexican wolf captive breeding program for the USFWS and meets annually with the primary purpose to discuss population demographics, management and research needs, as well as to make breeding and transfer recommendations for the upcoming year.  The meeting was attended by USFWS, AZGFD and representatives from captive breeding facilities from the United States and Mexico. The next SSP meeting will be held in Mexico during summer of 2019.

On July 18, the USFWS advertised the job announcement for the Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator position.  The application period closed on August 2, 2018.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lowercase letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicates breeding wolves.

Definitions:  A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status.  The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars.  The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.  Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.  At the end of July, there were 71 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, M1676, and f1683)

In July, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR.  Yearling f1683, M1676, and AM1338 were documented travelling separately. Male1676 made dispersal movements across the central and western portion of the ASNF and on the Coconino National Forest.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In July, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory this month within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In July, M1477 continued to be documented with an uncollared wolf.  The pair has been holding a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, and m1671)

In July, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677, and m1681)

In July, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the pack to reduce potential for conflict. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

In July, the IFT documented AM1382 travelling alone in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Pine Spring Pack (collared F1562 and AM1394)

In July, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared F1488 and M1471)

In July, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  F1488 and M1471 exhibited behavior and movements consistent with pup rearing. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)

In July, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In July, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In July, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF and in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared M1574

In July, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)

In July, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In July, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and f1674)

In July, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In July, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During July, the Copper Creek Pack was not located.  Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During July, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).  The Dark Canyon Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During July, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and AM1447)

In July, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.  The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During July, the Hawks Nest Pack began travelling separately.  Alpha male 1038 continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF, while F1437 has consistently been located with its natal pack (Elk Horn) in Arizona.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During July, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  The Iron Creek Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During July, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  The IFT discontinued the supplemental food cache. The Lava Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During July, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During July, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The Luna Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during July.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1664 and f1705)

During July, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The Mangas Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during July.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During July, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack and implemented continuous hazing efforts to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The Prieto Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during July.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During July, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the San Mateo Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The San Mateo Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during July.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During July AF1553, of the SBP Pack and single M1561 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.  The wolves continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with rearing pups.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)

In July the IFT documented an uncollared male wolf travelling with F1788.  The IFT has continued efforts to determine reproductive status of this pack and to reduce potential for further conflict with cattle by maintaining a diversionary food cache and conducting intensive hazing efforts.

Single collared M1486

During July, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1561

During July, M1561 has been travelling and rearing pups with AF1553 of the Sheepherder’s Baseball Park Pack.

Single collared M1673

During July, M1673 travelled throughout the southern portion of the GNF, largely within the Dark Canyon Pack territory.

MORTALITIES

There were no mortalities documented in July.  From January 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018 there have been a total of 6 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of July, there were 7 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock.  There was one nuisance incident during July. From January 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018 there have been a total of 55 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 23 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On July 1, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow and calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow and calf were killed by a bear.

On July 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 4, a horseback range rider working cattle on the ASNF south of Greer had between 4 to 5 wolves approach to within 30 to 40 yards of the range rider and his dogs.  The rider stated the wolves’ attention was focused on his dogs that were barking at cattle. The rider made aggressive movements toward the wolves and yelled which caused the wolves to immediately retreat out of sight.  The wolves were not seen again by the rider. After the incident occurred the rider called and reported the event to the IFT.

On July 7, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a probable wolf injury.

On July 7, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 11, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined both cows were killed by a bear.

On July 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, NM.  The investigation concluded the calf had died from unknown causes.

On July 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a probable wolf kill.

On July 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf had been killed by a bear.

On July 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf had been killed by coyotes.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On July 10 through July 12, the IFT completed bi-annual helicopter training.

On July 11, the USFWS participated in an SSP Management Group meeting in Brookfield, Illinois.

On July 17, WMAT presented to Turkey Creek Livestock Association in East Fork, AZ.

On July 18, WMAT presented to BIA Forestry in Whiteriver, AZ.

On July 27, WMAT presented to the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project at Big Lake Recreation Area, AZ.

On July 28, AZGFD personnel presented to the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project at Big Lake Recreation Area, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In July, Craig Zurek left the IFT to continue his professional career.  Thank you Craig for your dedication and contribution to Mexican wolf recovery.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves.  A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263.  Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail10.atl261.mcdlv.net) on behalf of; Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Federal Plan Poised to Allow Landowners to Kill Endangered Red Wolves

Another chance to take action – USFWS has re-opened their public comment period!

On June 28, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced its proposal that could result with the extinction of the last wild red wolves. Today, fewer than 30 wolves remain in the wild.

Beyond reducing the red wolf recovery area by nearly 90% and limiting the wild population to just 10-15 wolves, USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting endangered species, will allow landowners to kill red wolves who stray beyond the newly-designated recovery area – and without any repercussions.

The good news is that USFWS has re-opened their public comment period, so if you didn’t have an opportunity to comment before the July 30th deadline, now is your chance to take action!

Take Action and join the thousands of people speaking up for endangered red wolves before the August 28 deadline. You can find the link to submit comments and talking points here.

No species should face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

Take action here: https://nywolf.org/support-us/red-wolf-proposed-10j-rule-take-action

  1. USA: Budget Rider Seeks to Remove Federal Protections From Gray Wolves Nationwide

Damaging anti-wildlife amendments (riders) that undermine Endangered Species Act (ESA) are still in play for the House FY 2019 Interior/EPA appropriations bill. One provision goes as far as to remove protection for gray wolves nationwide. Section 117 legislatively removes federal protections for all gray wolves in the lower 48 states except the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf.

If anti-wolf legislation is passed into law, wolves will die at the hands of trophy hunters.

Please help.

Please urge the leading members of the U.S. House and Senate to reject all policy riders in appropriations bills that would undermine the Endangered Species Act, including H.R. 6147 anti-wolf provision in section 117.

Take action here:

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51421/p/dia/action4/common/public/?action_KEY=25433

 

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

From Salty Dog via Change.org (change@mail.change.org)

  1. USA: US Secretary Zinke promotes Hunting by blending its Stats with Wildlife Watchers (Petition update)

7 Sep 2018 — Today Secretary Zinke promoted hunting/fishing by misleadingly blending its stats with wildlife watchers, a group he at best ignores and often attacks. He has done this many times. He said that 40% of Americans 16 and older pursue an outdoor activity like hunting, fishing and birding. Bringing in an economic activity of $156 billion.

The truth is 5% are hunting, the rest, 35% are bird watching, etc.

Zinke is a deliberate liar. Much like his boss.

Please, if you haven’t done so already, sign the petition here

 

Wolves and Wolfdogs

  • New research finds Mexican gray wolves aren’t part dog after all

From 1977 to 1980, Roy McBride combed pine and oak forests high in the Sierra Madre Occidental range of northern Mexico, searching for the last remaining wild Mexican gray wolves.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wanted to breed more endangered Mexican gray wolves in captivity to save them from extinction. Eradication campaigns had eliminated them from the wild in the United States, so the agency hired McBride to capture wolves across the border.

McBride caught three of the seven wolves on whose DNA the fate of the entire Mexican gray wolf subspecies would depend. But he was shocked when he saw some of the other founding wolves in the captive breeding program. They looked like dogs to him.

Anecdotal accounts of genetic impurities among these seven founders have long been a cannon for arguments against recovering this Gray wolf subspecies. A contaminated bloodline could undermine efforts to restore the wolf to its historical habitat.

Fish and Wildlife Service officials have rejected the accusations, but new research into the Mexican gray wolf bloodline found what advocates say is ample evidence to support findings that the bloodline is pure.

A University of Arizona study examined the DNA of decedents from each lineage the seven founding wolves created.

Since the 1980s, the captive breeding program, an international effort between the United States and Mexico, has grown to around 250 wolves.

At least 114 wolves roamed wild in Arizona and New Mexico at the time of the latest annual survey. And in February, Mexican officials reported 37 wild wolves south of the border.

The recovery program’s opponents have argued that Mexican gray wolves already went extinct, accusing program managers of raising a wolf bloodline contaminated by dogs or coyotes.

But the University of Arizona study found no evidence that any of the founding wolves were wolf-dog hybrids or that dogs had recently hybridized with Mexican gray wolves.

They analyzed 87 Mexican gray wolves, comparing DNA samples to that of dogs and other gray wolves.

It’s still an open question if wolves have interbred with coyotes and to what extent, but genetic work by the Fish and Wildlife Service suggests they have not.

Their research could have dealt a blow to the recovery program if it had found wolf-dog hybridization.

McBride warned that questions of impurities would always haunt the Mexican gray wolf bloodline.

Recovery program officials have tried to dispel this misperception, but it’s been around since recovery efforts started and repeatedly comes up at public meetings. In 2006, a rancher and a Catron County employee in New Mexico suspected that two animals the rancher had killed were wolf-dog hybrids.

The county employee said he gave blood and tissue samples from the animals to a biologist at the recovery program to test, the investigators noted. But county commissioners later accused the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Project of destroying the samples.

This accusation and more against the recovery project sparked the investigation by the department’s Office of Inspector General. Among their other claims, the Catron County commissioners more broadly alleged that Mexican Gray wolves had severely interbred with dogs or coyotes.

Apache County also passed an ordinance in 2013 that questioned the legality of releasing Mexican gray wolves in light of the county’s suspicion that the subspecies was really a “wolf-dog hybrid.”

It has happened in the past, but the pups were euthanized in their den, and the recovery program tests every wolf and coyote they catch for genetic purity.

Beyond disproving wolf-dog hybridization, researchers found that Mexican gray wolves’ genetic variety is deteriorating, which could limit their ability to evolve and adapt to their environment.

In general this loss of variation makes Mexican Gray wolves much more susceptible to things in the future, like disease.

Genetic issues, like “loss of adaptive potential,” are a top threat to these wolves. The plan aims to increase gene diversity by releasing more captive wolves into the wild and moving wild wolves around on the landscape to breed.

Mexican gray wolves will remain on the endangered species list until officials release 22 in the U.S. and 37 in Mexico that survive to reach breeding age at 2 years old. Wolf populations must also average 320 in the United States and 200 in Mexico over eight years.

The study’s main findings — that wolves are not hybridized with dogs — are important, but the decline in genetic variety is very concerning.

Excerpt from the original article by Alex Devoid at

You can follow the azcentral and Arizona Republic environmental reporting team at OurGrandAZ on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 153

Finally Sleeping by Megan K McConnell

Eight pups in the pack,
all so innocent,
all so quaint.
Each travelling home for the frigid cold to come,
not a care in the world,
not a worry in their thoughts,
Till the winter traffic began to roar.

The adults went first,
the pups went next,
that’s when the pain full scream cried out.
His bloody paws,
his shallow breath,
drawn with pain at every attempt.

His wails are weakening,
his cries are piercing,
his strength is dying,
his heart is stopping.

His one last breath is drawn deeply,
his deep blue eyes are finally Sleeping.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Nothing new to report this month

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 166, August 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 166, August 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

Let’s have a look at what we’ve got for you this month:

More dreadful updates on the US’s plans to reshape their natural fauna according to what will generate money from the trigger-happy portion of the populace and the associated industries. And the world stands by and hardly takes notice.

500 x 50 – an excellent and highly feasible plan to ensure that the Wolf Sanctuary in Reitz can keep on running properly. You don’t understand? If 500 people donated the measly amount of Rand 50 every month, the lives of all the wolves at the sanctuary could be greatly improved. How much would that strain your monthly budget? And if everybody who joins in then brings in one friend, the target of 500 active supporters should be reached in no time. We, Erin and Ted, are participating. Are you?

Genetics can be utterly boring, but this one is really, really interesting: Read what geneticists found out about the wolves of the Pacific Northwest of North America.

We have a wolf tale, as usual, and Erin is jubilant about the first signs of spring, well, most of them anyway…

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more here

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018 here

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

Extracts from the HuskyRomi Newsletter July 2018

From the Sanctuary

I put out a plea on FB but I don’t think people understood it. I want to ask you as sponsors of HRWS to please try and assist us by spreading the word. I’m looking for five hundred people to contribute fifty Rand a month for the next while. I need to replace at least half the fencing at the sanctuary and also to put up secondary fencing between enclosures to stop any fighting. I’ve spent thousands of Rand on electric fencing, but the moment the cable touches the fence, it earths out and stops working. Some people donated more than the asked amount, which I’m very grateful for, but this needs to be an ongoing venture so that we can upgrade the whole sanctuary over a period of time. All I’m asking is to sacrifice a burger or something a month, maybe someone has a better idea.

June through July were very trying months. We suffered three horrific attacks on our wolves, two were through the fence by the packs next door and one was where a young female wanted dominance over the older female. Two of them were touch and go. Carley, a lovely wolf dog, was attacked by Frank’s pack and bitten very badly, you could see right inside her chest cavity and her shoulder muscles were crushed by the force of Frank’s jaws. Murray, our vet, didn’t think that she would make it through the night but she did. Carley walks with a bit of a limp but is outside running around with the Free Roamers, her previous pack which she left of her own choice. Thomas said that she never wants to be next door to Frank again.

Maya, an old Siberian wolf, was caught through the fence by the Afrikaner (Frankfort) Pack and had her entire rear end ripped off. This was another case of “she should have been put down”, but with lots of loving care from Kim Dijkman, Maya has come a long way. She may never be perfect again but then again who is? She walks around now, has a smile on her face and is very happy to be alive.

Snowy had her face badly bitten, we had her stitched up and we relocated her to an enclosure for the geriatrics. She has settled down but it did take a while as she longed for her old pack.

These are our three newest wolf arrivals: Akila was rescued from a man who was keeping her in a tiny 1m X 1m X 1m cage, she was three months old and riddled with worms. Her new owner just felt that she would be happier with her own kind so she is with Niska, Trigger and the puppies.

Dysan is a lovely big wolf with the most gentle nature, unwanted due to divorce. Conan also came from an abused home and was rescued by a nice couple, but he’s just becoming way too much for them to handle.

Log Cabin news

For you softer folk who don’t like camping but would like to spend a night with the wolves, we now have a log cabin with two single beds, solar powered lights and plug point to charge your laptop or whatever.

R400.00 per night, please book in advance.

Frans’s Ramblings

This morning when I was taking my animals out for their regular walk, I once again became aware of the aggressive small dog attitude that numerous small dog owners have, when a lady was proudly praising her little miniature Jack Russell that stormed out through their open gate attacking my Rottweiler while we were walking on the opposite sidewalk. Well, Titus is a 55kg brute and he nearly pulled me over as he retaliated in defense. The Jack Russell retreated under an oncoming car that fortunately saw what was happening and came to a stop. I did not even look back and just coaxed Titus in the right direction to continue our walk. Unfortunately I know that some people never learn and I know it will probably happen again and next time round the Jackie might not be so lucky.

Until next time, just stay warm and keep on howling.

Frans.

News from the Shire

Seems like things are starting to heat up again and we might be saying goodbye to winter (holding thumbs). Coldest one that we had in a while!

On that note, it is that time of year again when we need to start planning the calendars for 2019. They will be the same format as this year, A3 hanging wall calendar with 13/14 pages. Even as a NPO we unfortunately don’t get printing for free so we are looking for sponsors or donations to help. You can sponsor a page for R500. For that you will receive a calendar for free as well as your logo or message printed on the page you sponsor. There are still a few pages left so if you would like to get involved please send a message to Nolia Meyer on FB, email nolia@pentasure.ws or Whatsapp 0726221764. Plan to have the calendars ready by October.

Been a bit quiet on the event side this last couple of months with only Medieval coming up on the 1st of September but have been looking at other fundraising ideas. If you have an idea how to raise some extra money or if you want to run a fundraiser event, please contact us so we can discuss it further.

Click on the link for more info regarding Medieval. A fun day for the whole family

https://www.facebook.com/events/2064465623838295/

Thank you to everyone who supported Mandela Day and who made donations for the new fencing. We are still a long way from target but every bit helps. The My School has also grown so remember to swipe your card!

That’s all from me.

Keep on howling

Nolia

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: A Death Sentence for Red Wolves

The federal government seems bent on destroying what began as one of our nation’s greatest wildlife comeback stories.

As a result, red wolves are all but certain to go extinct in the wild – again.

You and I can’t let what began as such a success story end on such a heartbreaking and tragic note. This is a 100% preventable extinction.

Say ‘hell no’ to the red wolf extinction plan. Help us fight for the wildlife you love here

Last month the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to cripple the red wolf recovery program by:

  • Reducing the recovery area in Eastern North Carolina by nearly 90% – leaving barely enough room for a single wolf pack.
  • Allowing any wolf wandering outside the cramped confines of the Refuge to be gunned down, no questions asked.

30 years ago when the red wolf recovery effort launched it was destined to become a model for recovery of wolves across the U.S. The once nearly extinct population took root and grew to 150 wolves. But ever since anti-wolf extremists mounted an anti-wolf campaign, numbers have fallen.

Fewer than 40 red wolves cling to survival in the wild – won’t you help us fight for them? http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=cEN6zAx1IK-DxCaVyx_Dag

Red wolves, native to Eastern North Carolina, are a key part of our natural heritage. In our not so distant past, these animals ranged from Florida to Pennsylvania and as far west as Texas. There are no words for how tragic it would be to see them disappear forever.

Your donation will help fuel our all-out effort to rescue the red wolf from oblivion. You’ll help fund public outreach efforts in North Carolina, build community support for wolf conservation, and help us hold Fish and Wildlife Service’s feet to the fire, including legal action if necessary.

Stop the extinction of the Red Wolf: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=2clgYPBRxa4ToAXfrbQsdQ

The story isn’t over. With your help, we’ll get the happy ending we have sought for three decades. It’s the happy ending these wolves deserve. Are you with us?

Please give generously today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=U83JQAy0CM1yz45DSf1pqg

Thank you in advanced for your help.

  1. USA: Wolves in the crosshairs

If you’ve always wanted to gun down a wolf, then the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to make your day.

We cannot let the red wolf program end in tragedy and extinction.

We need to raise $29,000 in the next 48 hours to keep up the fight.

Please donate generously today here

The federal government seems bent on destroying what began as one of our nation’s greatest wildlife comeback stories.

As a result, red wolves are all but certain to go extinct in the wild – again.

You and I can’t let what began as such a success story end on such a heartbreaking and tragic note. This is a 100% preventable extinction.

Say ‘hell no’ to the red wolf extinction plan. Help us fight for the wildlife you love here

Last month the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to cripple the red wolf recovery program by:

  • Reducing the recovery area in Eastern North Carolina by nearly 90% – leaving barely enough room for a single wolf pack.
  • Allowing any wolf wandering outside the cramped confines of the Refuge to be gunned down, no questions asked.

30 years ago when the red wolf recovery effort launched it was destined to become a model for recovery of wolves across the U.S. The once nearly extinct population took root and grew to 150 wolves. But ever since anti-wolf extremists mounted an anti-wolf campaign, numbers have fallen.

Fewer than 40 red wolves cling to survival in the wild – won’t you help us fight for them? http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=N5E9fa9xmTa25bzVjiKdnQ

Red wolves, native to Eastern North Carolina, are a key part of our natural heritage. In our not so distant past, these animals ranged from Florida to Pennsylvania and as far west as Texas. There are no words for how tragic it would be to see them disappear forever.

Your donation will help fuel our all-out effort to rescue the red wolf from oblivion. You’ll help fund public outreach efforts in North Carolina, build community support for wolf conservation, and help us hold Fish and Wildlife Service’s feet to the fire, including legal action if necessary.

Stop the extinction of the Red Wolf: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=5hriqGdDMrjq69YESVyXJQ

The story isn’t over. With your help, we’ll get the happy ending we have sought for three decades. It’s the happy ending these wolves deserve. Are you with us?

Please give generously today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=b-KtqWAdnPy2RGWq5AGsDg

Thank you in advanced for your help.

  1. USA: ADD YOUR NAME: Speak up for red wolves

Catastrophic.

No other word comes close to describing the impact on critically endangered red wolves if this appalling proposal goes through.

Defying all logic, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is proposing a 90 percent reduction in the land available for red wolf recovery in eastern North Carolina. This area supports the last wild population of red wolves. And worse, the proposal would allow private landowners free reign to shoot any red wolves that wander across their property.

If this proposal goes into effect, it will be a death sentence for America’s most endangered wolf: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=i57hxbEXFg8TnnBdEYOUMA

URGENT – this proposal is an outrage – tell FWS to do their job and save red wolves!

Fewer than 40 red wolves cling to survival in the wild. If this proposed rule goes into effect, there will barely be room for 15 animals in the tiny patch of habitat that remains.

Protect Red Wolves today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Zo9YEl3JkD_wtvo3RuHmTg

In what was once a model recovery program, FWS reintroduced red wolves in North Carolina in 1987 – just seven years after they were declared extinct in the wild. As a result, the wild population of red wolves rebounded to nearly 150 individuals!

But after years of yielding to pressure from a vocal minority seeking to end the recovery of red wolves in the wild, FWS failed to follow through on its commitment to restore red wolves and is now proposing a rule that would certainly lead to their extinction in the wild!

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here

Germany: Let’s end the silence of the majority – Here’s how you can show your support!

Representative research shows that the majority thinks that the wolf has a right to live in Germany. It is also a fact that the wolf has been granted the highest protection status by the EU. Wolves are not allowed to be either disturbed or killed. But reality unfortunately looks different. In the past weeks alone four wolves have been shot, and another male wolf had to be euthanized because of a bad gunshot injury.

For years, the lobby consisting of politicians, farmer associations and hunters, has been trying to soften this high protection status; against the interest of the majority and existing laws. We cannot allow that legal claims are handled as bagatelles or that politicians, like Söder did recently, demand to shoot transmigrating wolves in the Allgäu. We urgently need the Good Ones to speak out. Wolves cannot speak for themselves and therefore we must do it for them. Please, support the movie project “Menschen fuer Woelfe” (Humans for Wolves) by Volker Vogel; it is a non-profit movie with 100% of all earnings going to the Verein Wolfsschutz Deutschland e.V. (Association for Wolfprotection Germany).

You can find further information about the movie and how to support it here: https://www.gofundme.com/menschen-fuer-woelfe

Thanks and kind regards

From ForceChange (TakeAction@ForceChange.com)

  1. USA: Stop Trump Administration From Allowing Bear Cubs and Wolf Pups to be Slaughtered

Target: Ryan Zinke, United States Secretary of the Interior

Goal: Protect Alaska’s wolf pups and bear cubs from unwarranted slaughter.

Alaska’s bears and wolves will soon be in danger of needless slaughter. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s plan to roll back protection laws for Alaskan bears and wolves is fast approaching, despite strong opposition from the state itself. The rollback of these Obama-era laws would allow cruel and unethical hunting practices such as baiting, killing hibernating bears, and laying traps for wolves during denning season. This would almost certainly spell the extinction of many different species of bear and wolf, who are already dying out due to unnecessary killings.

The legalization of these practices could lead to the extinction of many species of bear and wolf. Too many of these poor creatures have already been shot with “self-defense” as an excuse, while said creatures were quietly going about their own business and living their lives. Due to their history as predatory animals, bears and wolves have gained an unfair reputation used to justify these killings, and the last thing we need is for such cruelty to become fully legal.

We cannot allow this plan to succeed. Bears and wolves are living creatures that deserve better than to have their lives ended out of human paranoia or for sport. Sign this petition to demand Zinke call off his plan immediately.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Secretary Zinke,

Your plan to roll back protection laws for bears and wolves in Alaska is unethical and selfish. Too many of these creatures are ruthlessly killed by humans for sport, or shot while minding their own business with “self-defense” as an excuse. While bears and wolves may have a history as predatory animals, the majority of them would not harm humans unprovoked and are simply trying to live their lives. Additionally, many species of wolf and bear are nearly extinct despite laws set in place to protect them; rolling back these laws entirely would likely result in them disappearing forever.

The state of Alaska firmly opposes these plans to legalize hunting, trapping, baiting, and the killing of hibernating bears. You must respect the wishes of the population and keep protection laws for these animals firmly in place. Do not legalize the wholesale slaughter of innocent creatures for selfish reasons.

Please find the petition form to sign here

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: A sweeping rewrite of the Endangered Species Act

We’ve never been closer to a nation without wolves…without panthers…without sea otters, wolverines or songbirds.

The escalating war on the wildlife we all love has just taken a terrifying turn.

Yesterday, the Trump Administration put forward proposals that essentially take a chainsaw to the Endangered Species Act. If these proposals are enacted, wolves and other imperiled wildlife will be left to the mercy of hostile states.

And you know all too well where that leads.

It’s up to us to protect our nation’s wildlife. Please step up with the most generous donation you can afford: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=rxj3jrZ8R4CLBiZrErSgbg

Without a strong Endangered Species Act, states like Idaho and Wyoming could push wolves – and other animals we cherish – to the point of extermination. These reckless proposals represent the gravest setback I have seen in my 35-year career as a wildlife biologist. And as a mother, I fear for the planet my child will inherit.

Looking ahead, unless we stop this, Mexican gray wolves will once again disappear in the Southwest. Red wolves will once again go extinct in the wild. And our beloved gray wolf in the Northern Rockies will likely spiral toward extermination.

Please make an emergency donation today here

Defenders of Wildlife has the nation’s most committed, accomplished and passionate scientists, lawyers, policy experts, community organizers and other wildlife advocates working tirelessly to save the wildlife we all love.

The American people are on our side. History is on our side. I need you on our side, too! With your support of our work, I still have hope.

Please donate today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=0U4kTKkEqsgId3YUMXujtw

  1. USA: Stop this sickening attack on endangered wildlife

Everything we love, everything you and I have worked for, is at stake.

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) is under unprecedented assault by Congress and the Trump Administration. More than 100 anti-ESA bills and amendments have been proposed by this Congress alone, and to make matters worse, Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke recently proposed changes to the ESA that would dismantle this landmark law by gutting existing protections for threatened and endangered wildlife. We can’t let this happen.

We need your immediate help to stop this despicable plan here

Our planet is currently facing an extinction crisis of epic proportions with the potential for losing half of all species to extinction in as little as 33 years!

We cannot let the Trump Administration dismantle threatened and endangered species’ last line of defense.

Tell the Trump Administration: Hands Off the ESA here

The Endangered Species Act is America’s most effective law for protecting wildlife in danger of extinction – in fact 99% of listed species have survived under the ESA’s care. Many have been set on a path to recovery, including the iconic American bald eagle, the grizzly bear, the Florida manatee, and more.

The Trump/Zinke Extinction Plan would weaken endangered species protections by:

  • Injecting economics into what should be purely science-based decisions about listing imperiled species;
  • Depriving threatened species from automatically receiving protections from killing, trapping, and other forms of harm and commercial exploitation; and
  • Further imperiling endangered species by limiting what wildlife experts can look at in their reviews of federal activities.

The only winners in this proposal are exploitive industries – developers, oil companies, mining companies and the like.

Most Americans favor a strong ESA. This is greed and big money politics at their absolute worst.

Please take action today here

  1. USA: We’d love your help

As a loyal supporter of Defenders of Wildlife, we value your opinion.

Your commitment to our mission makes you a very important partner in the work that we do together – and your thoughts matter to us a great deal.

That’s why we’re asking for just a few minutes of your time to complete an online survey to help us redesign the Defenders.org website. Can you spare just a few moments?

Take the survey now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=DLfCB_A3ZpXUV86qJD-Tng

Your input is invaluable as we consider improvements to our website. We want to redesign our site in a way that makes it easier for you to engage with Defenders in the way you want.

We realize you are extremely busy, so the survey should not take more than 10 minutes. This survey is also completely confidential.

And, as a special thank you, you’ll receive a 25% discount code here  to the Defenders of Wildlife Gift Center, which you can use toward adopting an animal or purchasing a Defenders t-shirt or other gear that helps fund our mission to protect and restore imperiled species.

Start the Defenders Website Redesign Survey here

From Salty Dog via Change.org (change@mail.change.org)

  1. USA: Trump and Zinke approve permits for Lion Trophies
  • Hunters who donate to Republicans given special permits to import lion trophies, report says
  • Original report here

The US Fish and Wildlife Service provided at least 33 Americans with permits to import 38 lion trophies between 2016 and 2018, according to copies of the applications received by the non-profit advocacy group Friends of Animals.

Those Americans include a major Republican fundraiser, a donor to Mr Trump’s presidential campaign and another donor who supports Republican candidates and committees.

The Fish and Wildlife Service released a statement defending the lion trophy import permits after they were first reported by HuffPost, saying “Legal, well-regulated hunting as part of a sound management program can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation.”

An official with the Fish and Wildlife Service could not specify the number of permits from past years in an interview with The Independent, but suggested that there did not appear to be a significant increase in approved applications.

The report arrived as Mr. Trump’s White House continued efforts to roll back regulations on trophy imports and seemingly reduce the size and scope of federal conservation efforts.

The administration’s recently proposed changes to the implementation of the Endangered Species Act were met with swift backlash from conservation groups, who accused the White House of signing a “death sentence for polar bears.” The changes would significantly alter the way the government determines regions of protected land for endangered species, foregoing a practice of saving land where an animal species could be expected to live if its population were to return to normal levels.

Under Mr. Trump, the federal government has also changed the way it processes trophy import applications, agreeing to review each in a “case by case” basis. The government has also reversed bans on imports from African countries like Zambia and Zimbabwe, with the Fish and Wildlife Service claiming sport hunting in those regions would “enhance the survival of the species in the wild.”

Priscilla Feral, president of Friends of Animals, said in a statement that trophy hunting “must expire” in order to save certain species from extinction.

“If African wildlife is to survive the next few decades in their homelands, these elephants, lions and other animals ― coveted by hunters for their strength and beauty ― must be worth more alive than dead,” she said. “That means safeguarding habitat along with photographic safaris and ecotourism must outpace blood-drenched trophy hunting expeditions. Trophy hunting must expire and collapse from its own dead weight.”

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in the Pacific Northwest

Mixed-ancestry wolves are recolonizing the Pacific Northwest

In the early 20th century, wolves had been wiped out in Washington; they had fallen victim of bounty hunting to make space to expanding ranching and farming. But thanks to protection by the state and federal wildlife authorities, wolves over the past two decades have been reclaiming their former space, although new research has discovered a magnificent difference – the wolves now living and hunting in Washington’s forests are different from those that lived there more than a century ago. These new wolves are hybrids — crossbreeds of inland wolves from the interior United States and a unique, beach-loving subspecies from as far north as Southeast Alaska.

The researchers who have discovery this fact think that the hybrid wolves’ DNA could help them thrive in a changing landscape.

First it was thought that the wolf packs slowly re-colonizing not only Washington but also Oregon and California are descendants of wolves migrating west from the interior, the mountains, plains, and forests of Montana and Idaho. But the DNA analyses from wolves throughout the Pacific Northwest told a different story. Recent results show that some of the wolves have unique genetic markers that could have only come from the distinct coastal wolves of British Columbia and Southeast Alaska.

Coastal wolves differ from their interior cousins in a number of important ways. They don’t stalk large mammals such as elk through forests and fields, but spend much of their time on beaches, hunting salmon and marine mammals such as seals. Coastal wolves also look different; they are smaller and their fur has a red-brown tinge.

So far, the hybrid wolves are sticking to the lifestyle of their ancestors from the east, because they presently inhabitat a territory more suited for the live of interior wolves, but the researchers suspect that over time they’ll begin to establish in habitat that’s more suitable for coastal wolves. As the climate continues to change, it is furthermore suspected that the hybrid wolves’ genetic diversity will allow them to adapt better than if they just had genes from interior wolves.

Even without the benefits of genetic mixing, wolves are generally quite adaptable animals. In Yellowstone Park, for instance, wolves hunt prey as large as bison, because these wolves are much larger than those in surrounding regions, but their size is the consequence of a diet driven by learned behavior rather than genetics.

The finding also offers a life preserver of a sort to the coastal wolves of British Columbia and Alaska, whose populations are dwindling in many parts of their range. The hybrids may serve as a genetic reservoir, protecting some of the coastal wolves’ distinctive traits.

But while the hybrid wolf population may act as a reservoir, it also could cause problems in the case if the Alaskan coastal wolves became protected under the United States Endangered Species Act, because that would force wildlife managers in the Pacific Northwest to manage wolves that share genetic traits with federally protected animals. The Endangered Species Act doesn’t have a lot of language regarding how to deal with hybridization.

Still the researchers hope that their findings will inspire biologists and policymakers to focus on sorting out the unanswered legal question of what should be done when the ancestor of a hybrid animal is an endangered species and whether these mixed-lineage descendants should be protected as well or left vulnerable to hunting and habitat loss. They think that the hybrid wolves’ mixed heritage will be an asset as they continue to reclaim their species’ old haunts across the Pacific Northwest.

Excerpt from the article by Rebecca Heisman at 

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 152

To the Sky by Aimee Yuna

Raising his blood-stained muzzle to the sky, Phantom wondered how it would all turn out. His pack, full of worthy, strong wolves was falling apart. His mate sick, but soon to be well with pups on the way. Phantom gnashed his teeth and returned to his meal, ripping at the raw caribou flesh. His mate, Tanja strode up beside him gracefully, sweeping her silver streaked head under his ruff. Phantom flinched at her touch, then his golden yellow eyes stared down at her. How beautiful she was, her rime-silver fur, those doey brown eyes. She brushed by him and started eating at the caribou carcass. He opened his mouth in a wolf-grin. The rest of his pack, the seven other members, betas and omegas alike were together.

The yearlings of before there too. They stood, watching the two alphas share a meal, waiting as the snow began to fall. The snow peppered the sky, falling to the ground, covering it in white velvet.

As the two mates finished their feast, the other wolves closed in. Licking her chops, Tanja walked away from the carcass. She walked away and flicked her tail at Phantom’s nose. She sat at the edge of the forest. Phantom looked up at the approaching wolves. He watched them, stepping away from the kill, he recognized all the members of his pack. Jahotec, his strong and powerful beta. Brother, friend and fierce fighter. The icy white wolf walked towards the caribou and began to feast, sinking his teeth into the flank. Then came the two females, both a tawny red shade walking behind Jahotec, their names were Ryn and Riika. Riika brushed by her brother Kyo and ran to the feast. Then came the distempered ones. Lupa, Augen, Zai and of course, the Sero. Sero and his group were to overthrow the alpha. He knew … but how to change him?

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Hooray, spring has arrived, eventually. The weather is sunny and warm, night temperatures are bearable again and Nature has started to awake from hibernation. I just love this time of the year when everything comes back to life, looking fresh and renewed. What’s still missing is the rain, but the rather strong winds we have at times are promising.

Unfortunately this also brings some not-so-nice things with it; the pack has started shedding the thick undercoat, very much to my dislike, because now the most commonly ingested fibre in our household is fluff. And that also means that it is time for spring cleaning – another type of work that I cannot really call my favourite, not to mention the garden that now needs lots of attention and watering in particular.

While I don’t mind the watering too much, going after the weeds, loosening the soil and preparing it for seeding and planting is another fish to fry. Surely I have help from the gardeners when it comes to heavy work, but how much can they manage in just one day per week? I have already visited some nurseries and the big table behind the house is full with new plants so I guess I have no choice but to shake off the winter blues and get going.

The biggest problem I have in the moment is that our pack loves to “help” me with the gardening; they think because I seem to have so much fun digging holes for the new plants they must make sure that I’m not running out of fun by digging the newly planted plants out so that I can plant them again (if there is enough of the plants left that’s worth re-planting). I therefore have to either find spots for them where the furry kids have no access to, or I have to put up temporary fencing around the new flower beds to prevent them from getting in there. I have already tried any trick in the books like wearing gloves when planting to prevent the smell of my hands becoming an attraction for digging, spraying pepper or vinegar around the new plants to make that area smell bad to their noses, but so far nothing has worked. I know that it will get worse when the first rain comes – and the little creepy crawlies deep in the ground wake up and come closer to the surface the kids will stand with their noses close to the ground, moving their heads and ears at high alert from side to side, listening attentively to what’s going on underground. Then, with a sudden leap (like foxes do) they will attack the spot and dig as if there would be no tomorrow to get whatever is moving about down there. And that not only in flower beds but also in the middle of the lawn. Sometimes it’s so bad that I fear I have to put up warning signs for pot holes in the lawn for potential burglars that could step into one during the night, break a leg and then sue us for causing them bodily harm. I don’t know if that’s at all possible here in SA, but it has happened in the US.

Springtime also means that Ascar II thinks he has to re-establish his position as alpha, spending most of the day with his nose tucked under Taima’s tail (I always wonder what he thinks he can smell there since she is spayed) and making it clear to Kajack II that he is boss. I think that’s called “spring feelings”.

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 165, July 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 165, July 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

It’s still way too cold for me up here on the Highveld!

The battle of pro-nature civilians against their anti-nature leaders continues in the US. Isn’t it depressing to realize that those who are elected to act in your interest will often do the exact opposite once they are in power? But then again, if dullards constitute the majority, even if only by a small margin, you just can’t win. And this is what bipedalists like the Horror Clown can and do count on. Just read what his administration has in mind for the last 40 Red Wolves, and basically all wildlife, and try not to puke.

On the home front, it was with great shock when we learnt that there had been another brutal attack on a game farm’s big cats. There seems to be a syndicate at work here, and it wouldn’t at all surprise me if some impotent East Asians were behind it, making use of the virtually inexhaustible supply of unscrupulous criminals we have in our wonderful country. Find the short write-up in the News section under Other News, National.

We have an update on the wolves in California this month, which makes for interesting reading. We also have another wolf tale. What we don’t have this month is news from Erin, but then again, her fingers are as stiffly frozen as are mine.

That’s why I keep it short this time.

Till next month,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more here

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here:

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Spring Break Camp 
SPRING SESSION: APRIL 3 – 6
For children entering grades 3 – 5  ​
Time: 9AM – 3PM
Fee: $300 per child for the 4-day program (Tuesday – Friday)
Information & registration HERE

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

Summer Internships for College Students

The Wolf Conservation Center is pleased to offer summer environmental education internship opportunities for college students! The environmental education internship is designed to expose interns to the field of conservation education and wildlife biology. Interns conduct a variety of education programs and assist with the daily operations of the WCC.

Information here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!
SUMMER FAMILY ADVENTURE August 5 – 10, 2018 here
FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018 here

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

HuskyRomi Newsletter June 2018

From the sanctuary

Life goes on out here, nothing much changes. We’ve had a volunteer Kim Dijkman from Holland out here helping in a big way over the last six weeks; she left us on the 3rd of July but has promised to come back from mid-August for another six weeks. Kim has taken on a few responsibilities around here, cleaning up around the containers, which was becoming a bit of an eye sore. She has also put a lot of effort into getting the volunteers room ready; we have purchased two double bunk beds, one mattress and three to follow as we can afford them.

Niska and her eight puppies are doing very well. The pups are adorable, pictures can’t even describe them, they are little characters each in their own right.

We’ve been going for well over ten years now and a lot of our original fencing is sagging; we are not asking you for money but we do need a lot of funding. One idea is five hundred people donating R50 a month – what can fifty Rand buy you nowadays, but there’s a lot that we could do with twenty five thousand Rand every month.

News from the Shire

Winter’s got us in our grip and I think a lot of us can’t wait for summer. Luckily we had a very nice sunny day at Fantasy Fayre.

What a truly amazing day! Alter Egos -Meryl & Dayle, really went all out again and a huge thank you to them for inviting HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary to be a part of this magical day! We enjoyed every moment and such a bunch of happy people that attended the Fayre.

Thank you to each and everyone who stopped at our stall to learn more and to support the sanctuary. Special thanks to Francois & Laurika for the help in setting up, Frans who delivered some new goodies, Debbie for bringing her soaps, Retha and Carlien for the visit and ongoing support, Mariska who stopped by to learn more and ended up spending a few hours helping out, Ryan & Bryan for being “wolves” for the day, Draco for giving all his treat donations to the sanctuary, Dianna for bringing Skylar/Boy and Silver for a visit and of course Jacques for always supporting. Some photos taken on the day. Hope to see you at the next event!

I finally received a photo of the winner of the Air Brush raffle from Geekfest 2017. Congratulations Mark! Looks like it found the perfect spot.

Finally decided to give a Rockwood Fundraiser another try (same as Barnyard). We are planning it for the 12th of September for the Jukebox Hits show. More details and how to get your tickets in next month newsletter.

If you have any ideas or donations for the markets please get in touch with me.

Till next month!

Nolia

Remember the different ways to get involved and to make a difference:

  1. Making a donation directly into the bank account

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account : 62296463989

Branch : 230833

Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

  1. Making use of the SMS line and donating R10 per SMS on all SA Networks

SMS “Donate HuskyRomi” to 48748

  1. Adding HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary as a beneficiary on your My School / My

Village/My Planet card (Remember you can have up to three beneficiaries)

Or SIGN UP FOR A MYSCHOOL CARD and make HuskyRomi Wolf

Sanctuary your charity of choice. You will be donating indirectly to

HuskyRomi without spending an extra cent, when you purchase at

Woolworths/Engen etc. Please take a moment to register a card

at https://www.myschool.co.za/supporter/apply/

Contact Nolia on FB, email to nolia@pentasure.ws or message to 0726221764 for any further assistance.

  1. By paying the entrance fee when you visit the sanctuary as well as buying

souvenirs at the different events throughout the year

  1. Virtual adopt / Sponsor an animal of your choice. There are different options

available so contact Frans if you would like to make a fix monthly donation

to an animal of your choice. You will also receive a certificate with a photo of

the animal that you chose to sponsor.

More from the sanctuary

We are always living on the cheap out here, our pick-up blew the motor and we found a 2nd hand engine, it runs but burns a lot of smoke/oil and we’re not sure how long she will last.

We’ve had three bad injuries out here, every one of them was life

threatening but the three animals have pulled through. Two of them were

due to old fencing that should be replaced or at least reinforced, we do

our best with what we have.

Sky is a beautiful wolf who lives down at the house, he is one of many

wolves who don’t have a sponsor, just look at that face, he makes James

Dean look ugly.

Well until next time, keep howling

Larry

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Wolves and other wildlife – beware!

The Trump administration is a who’s who of climate change-denying oil and gas boosters and special interests. And, extremists in Congress are embarking on a ruthless campaign to turn the clock back on wildlife protection.

I won’t lie. Animals will die in alarming numbers if the extremists get their way.

I know you share my love for wildlife. And you’ve been an important ally in protecting wolves, grizzlies and other wild things we love.

That’s why I implore you to take another step today and become a monthly donor to Defenders of Wildlife here

We know that President Trump views all things as resources to be exploited. And the ideologues and the oil barons he has named to his cabinet have their own agendas.

As a monthly sustainer, your support provides a steady, reliable source of contributions as we fight habitat loss and threats to wildlife.

  • What will happen to wolves in the lower 48 when stripped of all Endangered Species Act protection?
  • What will happen to dwindling African elephant populations when the doors are thrown open for importing illegal ivory?
  • What will happen to polar bears and other animals when the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and other precious wild habitats are opened for drilling, fracking and mining?

These are real threats, just some of the many we are sure to face in the months and years ahead.

Above all, your monthly donation will give us the resources we need to defend wildlife from the mounting threats they face. Become a monthly donor here

Not everyone shares the commitment to wildlife that you and I do. This is the moment when those of who care must do everything possible.

We can’t do this without you.

  1. USA: Take emergency action to save red wolves

Catastrophic.

No other word comes close to describing the impact on critically endangered red wolves if this appalling proposal goes through.

Defying all logic, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is proposing a 90 percent reduction in the land available for red wolf recovery in eastern North Carolina. This area supports the last wild population of red wolves. And worse, the proposal would allow private landowners free reign to shoot any red wolves that wander across their property.

If this proposal goes into effect, it will be a death sentence for America’s most endangered wolf.

URGENT – this proposal is an outrage – tell FWS to do their job and save red wolves here  http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=mwl5itrCH1tAqluLQUU-Zg

Fewer than 40 red wolves cling to survival in the wild. If this proposed rule goes into effect, there will barely be room for 15 animals in the tiny patch of habitat that remains.  Protect the Red Wolf: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=-GOQYF5r6926s55GsdTF8A

In what was once a model recovery program, FWS reintroduced red wolves in North Carolina in 1987 – just seven years after they were declared extinct in the wild. As a result, the wild population of red wolves rebounded to nearly 150 individuals!

But after years of yielding to pressure from a vocal minority seeking to end the recovery of red wolves in the wild, FWS failed to follow through on its commitment to restore red wolves and is now proposing a rule that would certainly lead to their extinction in the wild!

But there’s still time to stop this!

FWS is accepting comments until July 30th – so please – take a moment and speak out for red wolves today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=gSbE9Dj42HMv8odh2L4yIw

Thanks for all you do.

  1. USA: Keep up the fight for lobos!

Here’s the heartbreaking truth:

Mexican gray wolves are the most endangered gray wolves in the world and unless more of them are released into the wild, they are doomed to go extinct.

At the end of 2015 there were an estimated 97 Mexican gray wolves remaining in the wild. And just this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) confirmed that 14 Mexican gray wolf deaths were documented last year, marking the most in any single year since the federal government began reintroducing them in New Mexico and Arizona in 1998.

It’s critical that we make it clear to the Trump administration that we’re not backing down from Mexican gray wolf recovery!

Please, take action today. We must let the Trump administration know that Mexican gray wolf recovery is a top priority: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=dneqdCO6fShHN–kfp3GDw

Please, tell the Trump administration that more Mexican gray wolves MUST be released!

It’s been 40 years since the Mexican gray wolf, or “lobo,” was first listed under the Endangered Species Act. Since the lobo reintroduction program began in the late 1990s, FWS has never released enough wolves from captivity. In fact, from 2008 through 2015, only five new wolves were released into the wild.

Please take action for Mexican Gray Wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=A-BpUwmEbxdg53kHIQJ88Q

These wolves are running out of time. It’s up to you and me to protect their future in the wild.

Thank you for all you do.

4. USA: Fighting for Alaska predators, red wolves and the Arctic refuge

Help Protect Alaska’s Wolf Pups and Bear Cubs

The National Park Service (NPS) has proposed lifting a ban on extreme killing methods on Park Service lands in Alaska. If the ban is removed, wolves, bears and other predators will be vulnerable to appalling and cruel killing methods that most people strongly oppose. If the Park Service follows through on its plan, it will be legal to kill wolves and pups and mother bears and their cubs in their dens. Please act now to help prevent this from happening here

Disaster for Red Wolves

Defying all logic, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is proposing a 90 percent reduction in the land available for red wolf recovery in eastern North Carolina – the area that supports the last wild population of red wolves. Learn more here

  1. USA: A Death Sentence for Red Wolves

The federal government seems bent on destroying what began as one of our nation’s greatest wildlife comeback stories.

As a result, red wolves are all but certain to go extinct in the wild – again.

You and I can’t let what began as such a success story end on such a heartbreaking and tragic note. This is a 100% preventable extinction.

Say ‘hell no’ to the red wolf extinction plan. Help us fight for the wildlife you love here

Last month the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to cripple the red wolf recovery program by:

  • Reducing the recovery area in Eastern North Carolina by nearly 90% – leaving barely enough room for a single wolf pack.
  • Allowing any wolf wandering outside the cramped confines of the Refuge to be gunned down, no questions asked.

Thomas, 30 years ago when the red wolf recovery effort launched it was destined to become a model for recovery of wolves across the U.S. The once nearly extinct population took root and grew to 150 wolves. But ever since anti-wolf extremists mounted an anti-wolf campaign, numbers have fallen.

Fewer than 40 red wolves cling to survival in the wild – won’t you help us fight for them? http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=xd0fBsSppIqx7LcH3iuFlQ

Red wolves, native to Eastern North Carolina, are a key part of our natural heritage. In our not so distant past, these animals ranged from Florida to Pennsylvania and as far west as Texas. There are no words for how tragic it would be to see them disappear forever.

Your donation will help fuel our all-out effort to rescue the red wolf from oblivion. You’ll help fund public outreach efforts in North Carolina, build community support for wolf conservation, and help us hold Fish and Wildlife Service’s feet to the fire, including legal action if necessary.

Stop the extinction of the Red Wolf: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=jWgKF7nsp5OjaPbNiCRtiQ

The story isn’t over. With your help, we’ll get the happy ending we have sought for three decades. It’s the happy ending these wolves deserve. Are you with us?

Please give generously today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=bMrR2oq8YvYAP-lcgAcf2g

Thank you in advance for your help.

 

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here

  • Background information regarding the biting incident in Poland – How you can help
  • I am sure you have already heard about the incident in southeastern Poland where a wolf is believed to have attacked two children and a woman. The animal was shot dead, and the media had a field day with facts again not playing a role. There were even voices demanding the killing of the whole Polish and German wolf population. Now it turns out that the supposed wild wolf could also have been a wolf-dog that was kept in a kennel.
  • The hunt for the wolf must end and the media must eventually accept their responsibility of a neural and factual coverage of the topic wolf. It seems that many publishing houses and broadcasting corporations only focus on the wolf and are eagerly waiting for a wolf to do something, which he, according to their opinion (which is the opinion of many lobbyists and politicians), should not have done. But the incident in Poland also shows that often the humans are the guilty ones, provoking such incidents through wrong behavior and egotism. There is no valid reason for keeping a wolf as a pet and then to wonder why they lose their shyness of humans. To lock a wild animal up is animal abuse.
    Again a wolf had to pay with his life for human stupidity. Research has become a foreign word to many journalists, and one-sided reporting has priority. This is a dangerous development in the media world that can only be balanced with continuous disproof of intentional fake news.
  • Here you can read about the background and watch a video with the shot animal:
  • And here an open letter from us to the Stuttgarter Zeitung (Stuttgart newspaper).
  • To finish a project, initiated by our member, Volker Vogel, that is supposed to become the counterpart to such nationalistically reports, we still need to collect Euro 15.000; we already got 1/3 of the money needed from donations. Please help us to achieve this project, which is very close to our hearts, by donating any amount to this fund.
  • In addition to this we have started anti-poaching patrols in eastern Saxony. Like the Black Mambas in Africa we also want to achieve that our presence at all possible day and night times contributes to the poachers not feeling safe anymore. We are a small association with no help from the state and depend on donations. Here you can donate:
  • Berliner Sparkasse
    IBAN DE79 1005 0000 0190 7118 84
    BIC BELADEBEXXX orvia Paypal:
    http://wolfsschutz-deutschland.de/spenden-2/

From Change.org (Heather L. via Change.org; change@mail.change.org)

USA: Does the 2019 Appropriations Bill Target the Mexican Gray Wolf?

The 2019 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill was approved by the House Appropriations Committee today, and unfortunately it targets the Gray Wolf. Specifically, Section 117 would require the USFWS to delist the Gray Wolf nationwide. But included within Section 117 is Subsection 2, which states:
“Shall not affect the inclusion of the subspecies classified as the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) of the species gray wolf (Canis lupus) in such list.”

What in the world does this mean? Does it mean that the Mexican Gray Wolf will be excluded from the delisting? Or does it mean that the separate listing of the Mexican Gray Wolf is to be disregarded and the subspecies included within the delisting? If anyone understands legal speech and can interpret this for the rest of us, then that would be highly appreciated!

In any case, we must keep an eye on that rider and fight to remove it from the bill! If you live in the USA, then please write to your Congress representatives and tell them to ensure that this dangerous rider does not make it into the passed bill! The fate of the Mexican Gray Wolf might depend on it!

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – May 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf  or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.  For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoor.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com  and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On May 23, Judge Zipps of the United States District Court for the District of Arizona held a hearing in the 10(j) case to discuss both parties’ responses to the Court’s March 30, 2018 order.  An order following this hearing is pending.

On May 31, 2018 the USFWS published in the Federal Register its intent to conduct a 5-year status review under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, of 38 animal and plant species.  The Mexican wolf is included as one of the species under review. Section 4(c) (2) (A) of the Endangered Species Act requires the USFWS to review each listed species’ status at least once every 5 years.  A 5-year status review is based on the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of the review; therefore, the USFWS is requesting submission of any such information that has become available since the last review for each of the 38 species.  Please see the Federal Register notice for more information here.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018.  The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.  At the end of May, there were 73 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, M1676, and f1683)

In May, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).  Some individuals were occasionally documented on the SCAR. Yearling f1683 and M1676 were documented travelling with AM1338.  AF1335 was found dead in May.  The incident is under investigation.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In May, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 exhibited behaviour and movements suggesting that that animal may be dispersing.  The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache in a proactive effort intended to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, and m1671)

In May, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Elk Horn Pack continued to display behaviour in May consistent with denning.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677, and m1681)

In May, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache to reduce potential for conflict.  The Hoodoo Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during May.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

In May, the IFT documented the Panther Creek Pack in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  AF1339 was found dead in May.  The incident is under investigation.  After the mortality, AM1382 was documented travelling alone.  Sub-adult m1574 continued to travel alone and is now considered a single animal.  At the end of May, the pack consisted of only AM1382.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AF1562 and AM1394)

In May, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Pine Spring Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their territory during May.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AF1488 and AM1471)

In May, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack travelling within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  AF1488 exhibited behaviour and movements consistent with denning.  The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for conflict near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)

In May, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The Saffel Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during May.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In May, F1550 of the Hoodoo Pack had localized in the east central portion of the ASNF and has been consistently documented travelling with M1571 formerly of the Diamond Pack.

Single collared M1477

In May, the IFT documented M1477 in the east central portion of the ASNF.  This animal has continued to travel with an uncollared wolf.  They are now considered a pack and will be given a pack name in June.

Single collared F1489

In May, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In May, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)

In May, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In May, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.  They were documented as having produced pups.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and f1674)

In May, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In May, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During May, the Copper Creek Pack was not located.  Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack.  Single M1673 was documented travelling within the Copper Creek territory in May.  The IFT is monitoring M1673 to determine if it is travelling with the Copper Creek Pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During May, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).  In May, the IFT, cross-fostered two wild-born pups (one taken from the Iron Creek Pack and one taken from the Lava Pack) into the Dark Canyon den subsequent to cross-foster events of genetically valuable pups from captivity into both the Iron Creek and Lava Packs.  One pup from each den was removed during the cross-foster to reduce the litter size in an effort to increase chance of survival for the captive born pups.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During May, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).  The Datil Mountain Pack showed signs of denning in early May, however, leading into mid-late May behaviour was no longer consistent with denning.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and AM1447)

In May, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.  The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During May, the Hawks Nest Pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF. The pair is now considered the Hawks Nest Pack.  The Hawks Nest Pack showed signs of denning in April, however, leading into mid-May they have failed to show behaviour consistent with denning.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During May, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  The IFT cross-fostered two pups from the Endangered Wolf Center into the Iron Creek den in May.  One wild born pup was removed to reduce litter size and increase the chance of survival of the genetically valuable pups.  The Iron Creek pup was subsequently cross-fostered into the Dark Canyon Pack den.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During May, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  The IFT cross-fostered two pups from the Endangered Wolf Center into the Lava den in May.  One wild born pup was removed to reduce litter size and increase the chance of survival of the genetically valuable pups.  The Lava pup was subsequently cross-fostered into the Dark Canyon pack den.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During May, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During May, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and f1664)

During May the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.  The Mangas Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The IFT captured, collared and released a previously uncollared juvenile female wolf (f1705).

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During May, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT documented a minimum of 2 pups with the Prieto Pack.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During May, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT documented behaviour consistent with denning for the San Mateo Pack in late April and documented a minimum of 6 pups in May.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)

During May, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  AM1284, mp1667 and fp1682 were not located in May.

Single collared AM1155

During May, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was not located by the IFT.

Single collared M1486

During May, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1561

During May, M1561 was captured by the IFT north of I-40 in Arizona and translocated back into its natal pack territory in NM.  M1561 has remained in NM since the translocation.

Single collared M1673

During May, M1673 travelled throughout the southern portion of the GNF, largely within the Copper Creek Pack territory.

MORTALITIES

In May, AF1335 of the Bear Wallow Pack and AF1339 of the Panther Creek Pack were located dead in Arizona.  Both mortalities are under investigation.   From January 1, 2018 to May 31, 2018 there have been a total of 6 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of May, there were 14 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were 5 nuisance incidents investigated in May.  From January 1 to May 31, 2018 there have been a total of 39 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 17 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On May 6 and 11, the IFT investigated reports of two elk killed by wolves in Alpine.  The IFT investigated and determined both elk were killed by wolves from the Prime Canyon Pack.  On May 12, an elk was killed in Nutrioso by wolves from the Elk Horn Pack.  There were no interactions between humans and wolves during any of these incidents.  All elk carcasses were removed from private lands.  Concentrations of elk feeding in pasture land in these communities have remained high during this spring due to the forage in the wet meadows as compared with dry conditions on the adjacent ASNF.  The IFT encourages all residents to report any wolf sightings in proximity to residences by calling the phone number listed above.  The IFT continued active hazing efforts of wolves in these areas and maintaining diversionary food caches to disrupt documented patterns of wolves regularly using areas inhabited by humans.  At the time this report was prepared, there have been no additional reports of elk killed by wolves in either of these communities.

On May 8, the IFT investigated a report of an interaction between a wolf and a dog at a residence in Alpine that reportedly had to be broken up by the owner of the dog.  The report was determined to be unfounded.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 15, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the injured calf was confirmed wolf.

On May 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 24, the IFT received a report from a turkey hunter who observed a collared wolf from his camp on national forest near Hannagan Meadow three times during a three hour period on May 21, 2018.  The hunter reported that in the early morning hours he first saw the wolf at a distance of approximately 150 yards away from the camp.  The wolf left, then returned 30 minutes later and was observed approximately 25 yards from the camp. The wolf left the area on its own, then returned a third time and was observed approximately 40 yards away around 9:00AM.  During this interaction the hunter never yelled or did anything to scare the wolf away.  The hunter was alone at the camp and there were no dogs present in camp.  The hunter indicated there was food present at the camp but he was not cooking at the time the wolf was observed.  The IFT confirmed this interaction involved a collared Mexican wolf from photographs taken during the incident.

On May 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was killed by a bear.

On May 26, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf had been killed by coyotes.

On May 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 29, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 29, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was killed by a bear.

On May 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation concluded the cause of death was unknown.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On May 2, USFWS presented to various tribes at the New Mexico Tribal Fish, Wildlife, and ESA Conservation Meeting.

On May 8, WMAT presented to the Boys and Girls Club in Whiteriver, AZ

On May 8, WMAT presented to WMAT Forestry Department in Canyon Day, AZ.

On May 10, WMAT presented to the Boys and Girls Club in Whiteriver, AZ

On May 16, the IFT gave a presentation on Mexican wolf biology, management and reintroduction efforts to a group of 6th grade children from Winslow, AZ at their annual camping trip on the ASNF.

On May 17, the Mexican Wolf/Livestock Council met in Springerville, AZ.

On May 24, WMAT presented at Whiteriver Elementary in Whiteriver, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

There are no project personnel updates for the month of May.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

From Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

USA: Trump Administration proposal to allow killing of endangered wolves

Red wolves are found only in America. They are one of the country’s most endangered species. There are as few as 30 of them left in the wild. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) should be redoubling its efforts to save them from extinction. Instead, they announced last week that the agency would if they wander out of the one wildlife refuge they’ve got.

Fight Ryan Zinke’s attack on critically-endangered red wolves with an emergency donation today here

The USFWS’ proposal would remove all but 10 to 15 wolves from the wild and limit their recovery area (the habitat they can safely traverse) by a staggering 90 percent. Wolves that cross these invisible boundaries could be killed without any consequences. The killers wouldn’t even have to pick up the phone to let USFWS know.

This is a betrayal of conservation and the Endangered Species Act. Help fight it with an emergency donation today here

The USFWS had multiple, scientifically sound options that biologists recommended. Instead of accepting these, Secretary Ryan Zinke and his political appointees chose to pursue the intentional extinction of red wolves. We won’t let him abandon these critically endangered wolves without a fight and neither should you. Please support our work to save the last of these critically-endangered wolves with a 100% tax deductible donation today here 

Thank you for your commitment to wildlife and wild places.

  1. USA: Send USFWS an email to help stop Zinke’s disastrous red wolf plan

Red wolves are under the greatest threat they have faced in decades and it is at the hands of the agency in charge of preventing their extinction.

Take action to stop this plan when you submit your comment today to protect endangered red wolves here educe the recovery area for critically endangered red wolves by 90 percent and remove nearly all of the remaining 30 red wolves from the wild.

On top of that, they will now allow poachers or anyone with a gun to kill these wolves if they cross an invisible line and wander outside of the recovery area. The USFWS does not even require that the poacher notify them. Their plan is a disaster and will almost certainly cause these wolves to become extinct in the wild.

The USFWS is accepting public comments on this revised plan through July 30th. Please submit your comment opposing this betrayal of endangered wolves and the Endangered Species Act today.

Scientists and wolf experts within the government presented the USFWS leadership with multiple scientifically-sound options to bring these wolves back. Instead of considering plans that would have increased the recovery zone or brought more captive-bred wolves into the wild where they can bolster those populations, Ryan Zinke and his political appointees raised the white flag of surrender and are walking away from their responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act.

You can help. Add your comment to the record opposing this outlandish plan to show Zinke that the public is not with him and that you see him here

The deadline to submit your public comment is July 30th. Our action page here USFWS’s system. Please submit your comment today here

Thank you for your commitment to wildlife and wild places.

Other News

National

From IOL News (https://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/limpopo/cops-launch-manhunt-after-gruesome-discovery-of-six-slain-lions-15777528)

  • Limpopo Province: Cops launch manhunt after gruesome discovery of six slain lions

On Sunday Limpopo police announced that the police in Rust De Winter in the Bela-Bela policing cluster have launched a manhunt for unknown suspects who killed six lions at a local game farm.

“It is alleged that an employee at the farm was on his way to work when he noticed bloodstains on the farm, followed by the gruesome discovery of four lions dead with their heads and paws chopped off. The other two lions were also dead but with no missing body parts,” Colonel Moatshe Ngoepe said.

Preliminary police investigations indicated that the lions might have been poisoned, and a pair of trousers with blood stains and takkies were also found at the scene. The suspects in this matter were unknown and no arrests had yet been made, Ngoepe said.

Anyone with information about the suspects involved should contact Colonel Alpheus Mokale at 082-565-6524, or the crime stop number 08600-10111 or the crime line sms 32211, or the nearest police station.

Next Door

From Johnny Rodrigues (newsletter@zimconservationtaskforce.com)

ZCTF Update – April 20th Newsletter

Zimbabwe lost approximately 750 elephants to cyanide poisoning along the SAVE River in the south eastern part of the country. Poisoning elephants results in a significant secondary loss of carnivores, vultures, and other species of birds and animals. The authorities have NOT managed to control or stop the use of poison, especially cyanide.  The poisoning of elephants occurred far too often for at least three to four years.  The damage being done to animals and their habitats will not be recoverable.

The Government Ministers, Military Officers, Prison Service Officers and other VIPs are lining their pockets with monies derived from poached ivory and game skins.  These individuals are thought to engage in these activities due to the possibility that

ZANU- PF might lose the elections in August. The Government does not appear to enforce the laws or the Wildlife Act as the practice of profiting from poached ivory and animals is so widespread.  It seems to be a “free for all.”

One solution would be for all Ministers and individuals in high positions to declare their assets and the manner in which they obtained their wealth.  For those who decline to declare their assets, an investigation into their financial dealings should commence. Corruption appears to run deep. Assets from individuals who cannot explain their fortunes should be frozen until an investigation is completed and they are cleared from wrongdoing.

The Ministers and/or their families who have camps near Safari areas or Wildlife Parks seem to be benefiting from the influx of trophy hunters from South Africa.  Monies gleaned from these hunters from hunting quotas and license permits seems questionable. This practice appears to be happening all over the country with no apparent controls in place.

Zimbabwe continues to export her treasured wildlife. They recently exported crocodiles, elephants and other wildlife to zoos in Dubai and China.

See our  new ZCTF Video –  Click Here To Watch

URGENT

We are in urgent need of donations in order to continue our work. If you can and wish to make a donation – please respond to this email with the subject line “I WISH TO MAKE A HELP ZCTF” and we will send instructions. Thank you and God Bless.

International

Nothing to report.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in CaliforniaBorn to be wild; gray wolf follows her father OR-7’s paw steps

A two-year-old gray wolf believed to be the offspring of the famed OR-7 was tracked on Friday to the Truckee area in Nevada County, not too far from Lake Tahoe, but it was only just a short visit.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife officials said the gray wolf, known as OR-54, has since returned to neighboring Sierra County. Still, her trip to Nevada County was the first known visit of a gray wolf to the region, the farthest south, since the early 1900s. And where she turns up next is anybody’s guess.

Although it’s not known what is motivating her journey, she could be in search for a mate or is being driven by the availability of food, or she was just born to be wild and has the itch to be out on her own and explore region’s unknown to her.

The female gray wolf, which was collared last fall, was located late last week about a mile and a half from Interstate 80 near Boreal Mountain, which means she travelled  at least 638 miles through five California counties.

It’s believed the gray wolf is one of OR-7’s daughters and has been generally covering a lot of the same territory her father did in 2011 through 2013.

OR-7, the first gray wolf in California since 1924, was first spotted in the North State in December 2011. He eventually settled back in southern Oregon, where he and a female gray wolf established what’s called the Rogue Pack and have raised litters every year since 2014. Since his travels, other wolves have since been found in California, some of which are from OR-7’s pack.

Another collared wolf from Oregon, known as  OR-44, has been found in eastern Siskiyou County, but he is not related to OR-7 or his offspring. And his movements have been difficult to track because his collar has battery problems.

News of OR-54’s travels throughout Northern California was met with delight by officials from the Tucson, Arizona-based and nonprofit Center for Biological Diversity.

“That’s tremendously exciting news for wolves in California,” Amaroq Weiss, its West Coast wolf advocate, said in a written statement. “This wolf who followed her famous father’s footsteps into California is now making history of her own, exploring beyond where he traveled into great wolf habitat in the Sierras.”

Original article by Jim Schultz here

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 151

Awakening of the White Wolf

by Bryan Jones

He rises from his long slumber.

Much time has passed since he has walked in her light but a voice he remembers from a time ago is like a song to his ears and has awoken him from his deep sleep.

Although it has been many years he can still recall the short time they were together and it saddens his heart that he slept so long and almost forgot the spirit inside of him but he does not weep for he is also glad to be awake once more.

As he emerges from where he has slept and stretches his tired muscles his senses become sharper and he greets the coming evening with a renewed energy and sees again with his eyes the world before him.

He begins to move through the wild and a hunger starts in his belly for it has been a long time since he has enjoyed her company and knows only one way to satisfy his growing hunger.

Once more the hunter inside him arises.

As his journey begins he stops by a pool of water to quench his thirst.

While he is drinking he looks at his reflection and contemplates what he sees Although he is older his heart is still young and in his eyes you can still see the glint of the youth that wants to play and run through the country without a care in the world.

But you can also see the elder who has gained the wisdom that comes with age and is more careful as he travels in this life.

As he moves on his mind returns to his ever growing hunger and he must begin his hunt, He travels on and soon comes to the top of a tall mountain and he searches for a sign to show him the way but as he looks out over the land he sees nothing to help him in his quest.

Above him as the clouds move in the night sky he sees what he is searching for.

Although she is far away he has traveled far before and as the sky clears and the stars emerge she shines brightly like a beacon in the night and he walks in her light once more.

The light of the Bright Moon.

And the White Wolf howls.

The White Wolf howls but there is no moon.

No longer does he yearn for the sight of her brightness in the night sky for its hold on him is no longer as strong as it once was.

He has found a new reason to lift his voice to the night. His howls now echo with a new song in his heart.

In his voice a song of a new found friend now fill the woods.

Although he travels alone most times and draws strength from his independence the chance meeting of kindred spirit has elated his soul.

Seldom in his travels does he meet another who understands his ways and has traveled along the same roads in life that he has journeyed over.

The ways of the wolf are strange to most but inside of her he sees that she also shares some of the same spirit he has in her own ways and is attracted to her because of it.

As they get to know each other better he sees in her a jumble of mixed emotions and knows that her mind and soul are troubled and wants to help her sprit mend.

He listens as she tells him of the obstacles that block her happiness. He hears her spirit yearn for a simpler life.

A life without problems brought about by others who want to bring her down and it saddens his heart to feel all the sadness in her life that she does not deserve to have.

He also listens as she tells him of good things in her life and sees how her eyes light up when she speaks of her son.

He feels the emotions of a proud mother come out of her and knows that his young spirit gives her strength in times of need.

He can also see within her the beautiful spirit that is the true soul within her and knows she deserves so much more happiness in her life and wants to help her find it.

As he rests and thinks to himself how he can help mend her broken spirit and bring more light to her soul his senses remind him to be careful.

In the past his willingness to help others has hurt him and he has learned to stay cautious and guard his feelings well.

While he contemplates his new friend’s dilemma he also senses more from her soul and it confuses him.

But it also intrigues his senses for he knows the future with this new friend can be a new adventure and he decides that he will take on this task because if he can help to brighten her spirit it will also strengthen his own spirit and be good for them both and that makes him glad.

Once again, the White Wolf howls

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Nothing to report this month

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 164, June 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 164, June 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

If you visit a nature reserve, no matter where in the world, and you pick up as much as a dead leaf to take home, legally speaking, you are committing a crime. If a government tries to promote the use of extreme methods to kill wildlife in national reserves to boost populations of game animals, it is called America first. And again it is Alaska where brain-dead politicians want to allow hunters to bait, trap and snare bears and wolves, kill their cubs in their dens, and shoot defenceless caribou from boats or from the banks as they swim across rivers – in protected areas, mind you. Yeah, I was almost expecting that democratically elected anti-wildlife criminals would come crawling from under their stones and try to further their ends, now that they only have to wave profit prognoses at their Führer.

Another matter very close to my heart, but much closer to home is the Wolf Sanctuary in Reitz in the Free State. If you haven’t been there yet, you may find it difficult to understand why, but if you have and have experienced the uncompromising passion with which rescued and abandoned wolves, wolfdogs, and huskies are cared for there in spite of everything, you will most certainly know what I am talking about. They need, and truly deserve, every bit of support they can get. If you are planning on travelling between Gauteng and KZN, in the next “crazy season” for example, I can only urge to take the “scenic route” via Frankfort, Bethlehem and Harrismith rather than the highways and stop over at Reitz. Your view of wolves and sanctuaries will never be the same afterwards, I promise!

Did you ever realize that most wolf-lovers are actually “cat people”? It doesn’t surprise me in the least, for I am a cat person, too. Wolves are just so much more like cats in their ways than like dogs. It therefore came as a terrible shock to Erin and me when we learnt what has happened at the newly reopened Jugomaro Predator Park in Limpopo. Our hearts really bleed for both the precious animals and the owners.

For a change, we have selected a werewolf and not a wolf tale for this newsletter, and I imagined the Horror Clown sitting at that campfire.

Erin tells how she tracked down a major source of food for our pack that had suddenly disappeared some two years back. In the end, it forced us to buy yet another chest freezer. You have to make hay as long as sun shines, so they say. And while the sun shines from a bright blue sky today, it is bitterly cold up here. I am simply not made for winter.

If you have read it, please post a review of my book, A Houseful Headful of Wolves (German edition: Das Haus Den Kopf voller Wölfe), by following the link on SAFOW’s Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/safhowl) or directly at http://safow.org/book-review/ . It can be as short or long as you wish, in English or German, and you can remain completely anonymous. I really love to know how it comes across.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more at: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07ecvklsy03664a135&oseq=&c=&ch=

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here.

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Spring Break Camp 
SPRING SESSION: APRIL 3 – 6
For children entering grades 3 – 5  ​
Time: 9AM – 3PM
Fee: $300 per child for the 4-day program (Tuesday – Friday)
Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the center home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here.

Summer Internships for College Students

The Wolf Conservation Center is pleased to offer summer environmental education internship opportunities for college students! The environmental education internship is designed to expose interns to the field of conservation education and wildlife biology. Interns conduct a variety of education programs and assist with the daily operations of the WCC.

Information here.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (website)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!
SUMMER FAMILY ADVENTURE: August 5 – 10, 2018: Details here.
FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018: Details here.

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary Newsletter May 2018

From the sanctuary

I’m not sure what to say, the animals and I are all healthy, we need lots more support but if you are reading this newsletter then you are already a supporter and we are grateful to you for your ongoing support.

We need a farm pick-up, I’ve spent nearly 25k keeping our Isuzu going over the last couple of months, I’ve approached car dealers but they can’t help us because of the consumers protection act so we can’t even buy a lemon from them and we can’t raise the finance to purchase a slightly better one because we are a NPO, if you can come up with any suggestions please forward them to me, remember we have a PBO number which means that you can claim it back from SARS.

If you think that you can help us or may know of someone who can or is willing to help please let us know, we are desperate, but I can’t go on begging, the conditions aren’t always so great but the animals are well fed and loved out here.

Frans’s Ramblings

From the end of December until well into April, things were quite quiet on the rescue scene and then the heavens opened up once again. I reported in the previous newsletter about the full trailer load that I moved at the end of April. Since then it still did not stop. The very next week we received a message about a family that emigrated to Australia and left a five year old wolf cross female behind. There are a couple of different versions to this story, so I will rather not go into it, but I arranged to go and collect her and take her to HuskyRomi the following Saturday. Late that Friday evening, I received a call from our contact there stating that Niska had a litter of puppies and what now? I swallowed, sat down, and said I will take them all. The following Whatsapp message was that it was seven pups. I called Larry and notified him that I am bringing through eight animals and not only one. As it turned out it was nine because the original count was wrong. Anyway, Niska and her rapidly growing family have settled in nicely at HuskyRomi, but will have to be moved out of the house into an enclosure pretty soon. To do this, Larry has to make some changes to the enclosures around the house and he requires a bit of additional financial assistance to do so. If anybody can contribute to this project, please get in contact with Larry directly. Donations can be made directly into the HuskyRomi account, via the PayFast Donation platform or via the new PayPal account and any amount will be much appreciated.

The next weekend I had work commitments and Derek offered to go and collect a wolf in Westonaria that also required re-homing. Shadow is a lovely long haired wolf and Larry is busy preparing an enclosure for him to share with Jakkals (that came from Carltonville).

This past Sunday, Larry drove down to KZN to collect Shiloh. The re-homing went very well and she made herself at home immediately.

Enough from me for now. Take care and keep howling.

Frans.

News from the Shire

With the changing seasons it seems like people tend to change animals as well, as if they were disposable “things”. Like Frans mentioned there has been an influx of new animals to the sanctuary in the last couple of months and that is putting strain on the existing resources. So I decided to share all the ways you can help and make a difference.

The different ways to help:

  1. Making a donation directly into the bank account

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary
First National Bank
Account : 62296463989
Branch : 23083
Cheque Acc
Ref: Donation / Your name

  1. Making use of the SMS line and donating R10 per SMS on all SA Networks

SMS “Donate HuskyRomi” to 48748

  1. Adding HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary as a beneficiary on your My School / My

Village/My Planet card (Remember you can have up to three beneficiaries)
Or SIGN UP FOR A MYSCHOOL CARD and make HuskyRomi Wolf
Sanctuary your charity of choice. You will be donating indirectly to
HuskyRomi without spending an extra cent, when you purchase at
Woolworths/Engen etc. Please take a moment to register a card
at https://www.myschool.co.za/supporter/apply/

Contact Nolia on FB, email to nolia@pentasure.ws or message to
0726221764 for any further assistance.

  1. By paying the entrance fee when you visit the sanctuary as well as buying
    souvenirs at the different events throughout the year
  1. Virtual adopt / Sponsor an animal of your choice. There are different options
    available so contact Larry or Frans if you would like to make a fix monthly donation
    to an animal of your choice. You will also receive a certificate with a photo of
    the animal that you chose to sponsor.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Help stop this brutal killing!

Just when you thought it couldn’t get any worse…

The Trump administration has proposed opening National Park Service lands to a potential wave of barbaric killing, including bear cubs and wolf pups in their dens.

We’re pulling out all the stops to prevent this inhumane killing, and we need your help.

Your urgent support of $10 or more will provide the resources we need to turn back despicable attacks on the wildlife you love: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=l9HlbH2RQbB_iPiE2Z7cuQ

Here’s what we’ve learned:

The Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw protections preventing the use of extreme methods to kill wildlife in Alaska national preserves. That would leave wildlife on these federally-protected lands at the mercy of the state. And Alaska state wildlife policy is especially focused on one thing: aggressively killing predators to boost populations of game animals.

Help us stop these brutal killings: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=MW-_exeV5N3J2d2ABhsaSg

The list of extreme methods that could be allowed is nothing short of shocking. The regulatory rollback would allow hunters to bait, trap and snare bears. It could allow them to kill black bears and cubs and wolves and pups in their dens.

The change could also open the way for hunters to kill defenseless caribou from boats or shore as they swim across rivers in national preserves.

Even for this Administration, opening these public lands to such vicious killing represents a new low.

With your donation of $10 or more, we will do what it takes, including court action, to prevent this brutal killing: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=OB7hiN_ZdGl7og3EpZ7zjg

Thank you in advance for your urgent support.

  1. USA: Wolves and other wildlife – beware!

The Trump administration is a who’s who of climate change-denying oil and gas boosters and special interests. And, extremists in Congress are embarking on a ruthless campaign to turn the clock back on wildlife protection.

I won’t lie. Animals will die in alarming numbers if the extremists get their way.

I know you share my love for wildlife. And you’ve been an important ally in protecting wolves, grizzlies and other wild things we love.

That’s why I implore you to take another step today and become a monthly donor to Defenders of Wildlife: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=CapWj_eq-Vm8OfxU0YiPaA

We know that President Trump views all things as resources to be exploited. And the ideologues and the oil barons he has named to his cabinet have their own agendas.

As a monthly sustainer, your support provides a steady, reliable source of contributions as we fight habitat loss and threats to wildlife.

  • What will happen to wolves in the lower 48 when stripped of all Endangered Species Act protection?
  • What will happen to dwindling African elephant populations when the doors are thrown open for importing illegal ivory?
  • What will happen to polar bears and other animals when the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and other precious wild habitats are opened for drilling, fracking and mining?

These are real threats, just some of the many we are sure to face in the months and years ahead. Above all, your monthly donation will give us the resources we need to defend wildlife from the mounting threats they face. Become a monthly donor today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Ecl9x6hT14iMaNzz5pw3Bw

Not everyone shares the commitment to wildlife that you and I do. This is the moment when those of who care must do everything possible.

We can’t do this without you.

  1. Mexico: Keep up the fight for lobos!

Here’s the heartbreaking truth:

Mexican gray wolves are the most endangered gray wolves in the world and unless more of them are released into the wild, they are doomed to go extinct.

At the end of 2015 there were an estimated 97 Mexican gray wolves remaining in the wild. And just this week, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) confirmed that 14 Mexican gray wolf deaths were documented last year, marking the most in any single year since the federal government began reintroducing them in New Mexico and Arizona in 1998.

It’s critical that we make it clear to the Trump administration that we’re not backing down from Mexican gray wolf recovery!

Please, take action today: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=dneqdCO6fShHN–kfp3GDw We must let the Trump administration know that Mexican gray wolf recovery is a top priority.

Please, tell the Trump administration that more Mexican gray wolves MUST be released: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=JFLi2d_hBSrGrDC3UOQhRA

It’s been 40 years since the Mexican gray wolf, or “lobo,” was first listed under the Endangered Species Act. Since the lobo reintroduction program began in the late 1990s, FWS has never released enough wolves from captivity. In fact, from 2008 through 2015, only five new wolves were released into the wild.

Take action for Mexican Gray Wolves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=A-BpUwmEbxdg53kHIQJ88Q .

These wolves are running out of time. It’s up to you and me to protect their future in the wild.

Thank you for all you do.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

Germany: 68 fatalities in Saxony…

We are not talking human lives lost here, but those of wolves. And it is just the official death toll. Considering that only every third dead wolf would have been reported to the authorities, it may be safe to suppose that more that 200 wolves have fallen victim to humans since the year 2000 in Saxony alone. On the other hand, not a single human fell victim to a wolf.
Saxony’s Minister of the Environment, Thomas Schmidt, is quoted by the Leipzig Internet Newspaper as stating the following: “Sixty-eight wolves that were found dead or were euthanized in the Free State of Saxony were referred to the Senckenberg Museum für Naturkunde in Görlitz for post mortems.”, with the newspaper explaining that “euthanized” probably meant “put to sleep” or “shot dead” by official sanctioning (https://www.l-iz.de/politik/sachsen/2018/05/Seit-2000-sind-schon-68-tote-Woelfe-aus-Sachsen-untersucht-worden-218967).
Why Thomas Schmidt chose the word “Euthanasia” in conjunction with killing wild wolves remains a mystery.

From Change.org (Heather L. via Change.org; change@mail.change.org)

USA: Does the 2019 Appropriations Bill Target the Mexican Gray Wolf?

The 2019 Interior and Environment Appropriations Bill was approved by the House Appropriations Committee today, and unfortunately it targets the Gray Wolf. Specifically, Section 117 would require the USFWS to delist the Gray Wolf nationwide. But included within Section 117 is Subsection 2, which states:
“Shall not affect the inclusion of the subspecies classified as the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) of the species gray wolf (Canis lupus) in such list.”
What in the world does this mean? Does it mean that the Mexican Gray Wolf will be excluded from the delisting? Or does it mean that the separate listing of the Mexican Gray Wolf is to be disregarded and the subspecies included within the delisting? If anyone understands legal speech and can interpret this for the rest of us, then that would be highly appreciated!
In any case, we must keep an eye on that rider and fight to remove it from the bill! If you live in the USA, then please write to your Congress representatives and tell them to ensure that this dangerous rider does not make it into the passed bill! The fate of the Mexican Gray Wolf might depend on it!

Read more here.

Sign the petition here.

From ForceChange (TakeAction@ForceChange.com)

Stop Trump From Allowing Hunters to Kill Bears With Dogs, Slaughter Wolf Pups in Their Dens, and Use Motor Boats to Shoot Swimming Caribou

The Trump administration is about to allow hunters to bait brown bears with bacon and doughnuts, use spotlights to shoot mother bears and cubs hibernating in their dens, among other grotesque hunting techniques. Sign this petition to condemn Trump’s assault on wildlife here.

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail102.atl71.mcdlv.net); on behalf of Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Nine Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups Born at the WCC

Elusive. Endangered. Extremely Cute.

A critically endangered Mexican gray wolf living at the Wolf Conservation Center made a priceless contribution to the recovery of her rare and at-risk species on last week – she had pups!

On May 8, Mexican gray wolf F1143 (affectionately nicknamed Rosa by supporters) gave birth to a litter of nine pups – six boys and three girls. This is the first litter born to the pair – mom (age ten), and dad, (age eight).

Beyond being adorable, the wolf pups represent the Center’s active participation in an effort to save a species on the brink of extinction. The Mexican gray wolf or “lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America. By the mid-1980s, hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild, with only a handful remaining in captivity. In 1998 the wolves were reintroduced into the wild as part of a federal reintroduction program under the Endangered Species Act. Current estimates put the wild population at 114 in the United States. To watch the family’s progress, tune in to their live webcams!

https://nywolf.org/webcams/webcam-m1198-and-f1143

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – May 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

www.azgfd.gov/wolf  or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf . For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoor.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH .

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On May 23, Judge Zipps of the United States District Court for the District of Arizona held a hearing in the 10(j) case to discuss both parties’ responses to the Court’s March 30, 2018 order.  An order following this hearing is pending.

On May 31, 2018 the USFWS published in the Federal Register its intent to conduct a 5-year status review under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, of 38 animal and plant species.  The Mexican wolf is included as one of the species under review. Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the Endangered Species Act requires the USFWS to review each listed species’ status at least once every 5 years.  A 5-year status review is based on the best scientific and commercial data available at the time of the review; therefore, the USFWS is requesting submission of any such information that has become available since the last review for each of the 38 species.  Please see the Federal Register notice for more information here.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018.  The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.  At the end of May, there were 73 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, M1676, and f1683)

In May, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).  Some individuals were occasionally documented on the SCAR. Yearling f1683 and M1676 were documented travelling with AM1338.  AF1335 was found dead in May.  The incident is under investigation.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In May, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Yearling f1686 exhibited behaviour and movements suggesting that that animal may be dispersing.  The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache in a proactive effort intended to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, and m1671)

In May, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Elk Horn Pack continued to display behaviour in May consistent with denning.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677, and m1681)

In May, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache to reduce potential for conflict.  The Hoodoo Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during May.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

In May, the IFT documented the Panther Creek Pack in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  AF1339 was found dead in May.  The incident is under investigation.  After the mortality, AM1382 was documented travelling alone.  Sub-adult m1574 continued to travel alone and is now considered a single animal.  At the end of May, the pack consisted of only AM1382.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AF1562 and AM1394)

In May, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Pine Spring Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their territory during May.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AF1488 and AM1471)

In May, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack travelling within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  AF1488 exhibited behaviour and movements consistent with denning.  The IFT initiated a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for conflict near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)

In May, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The Saffel Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during May.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In May, F1550 of the Hoodoo Pack had localized in the east central portion of the ASNF and has been consistently documented travelling with M1571 formerly of the Diamond Pack.

Single collared M1477

In May, the IFT documented M1477 in the east central portion of the ASNF.  This animal has continued to travel with an uncollared wolf.  They are now considered a pack and will be given a pack name in June.

Single collared F1489

In May, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared M1574

In May, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)

In May, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In May, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.  They were documented as having produced pups.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and f1674)

In May, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In May, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During May, the Copper Creek Pack was not located.  Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack.  Single M1673 was documented travelling within the Copper Creek territory in May.  The IFT is monitoring M1673 to determine if it is travelling with the Copper Creek Pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During May, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).  In May, the IFT, cross-fostered two wild-born pups (one taken from the Iron Creek Pack and one taken from the Lava Pack) into the Dark Canyon den subsequent to cross-foster events of genetically valuable pups from captivity into both the Iron Creek and Lava Packs.  One pup from each den was removed during the cross-foster to reduce the litter size in an effort to increase chance of survival for the captive born pups.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During May, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).  The Datil Mountain Pack showed signs of denning in early May, however, leading into mid-late May behavior was no longer consistent with denning.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and AM1447)

In May, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.  The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During May, the Hawks Nest Pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF. The pair is now considered the Hawks Nest Pack.  The Hawks Nest Pack showed signs of denning in April, however, leading into mid-May they have failed to show behaviour consistent with denning.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During May, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  The IFT cross-fostered two pups from the Endangered Wolf Center into the Iron Creek den in May.  One wild born pup was removed to reduce litter size and increase the chance of survival of the genetically valuable pups.  The Iron Creek pup was subsequently cross-fostered into the Dark Canyon Pack den.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During May, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  The IFT cross-fostered two pups from the Endangered Wolf Center into the Lava den in May.  One wild born pup was removed to reduce litter size and increase the chance of survival of the genetically valuable pups.  The Lava pup was subsequently cross-fostered into the Dark Canyon pack den.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During May, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During May, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and f1664)

During May the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.  The Mangas Pack displayed behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The IFT captured, collared and released a previously uncollared juvenile female wolf (f1705).

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During May, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT documented a minimum of 2 pups with the Prieto Pack.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During May, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT documented behaviour consistent with denning for the San Mateo Pack in late April and documented a minimum of 6 pups in May.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)

During May, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  AM1284, mp1667 and fp1682 were not located in May.

Single collared AM1155

During May, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was not located by the IFT.

Single collared M1486

During May, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1561

During May, M1561 was captured by the IFT north of I-40 in Arizona and translocated back into its natal pack territory in NM.  M1561 has remained in NM since the translocation.

Single collared M1673

During May, M1673 travelled throughout the southern portion of the GNF, largely within the Copper Creek Pack territory.

MORTALITIES

In May, AF1335 of the Bear Wallow Pack and AF1339 of the Panther Creek Pack were located dead in Arizona.  Both mortalities are under investigation.   From January 1, 2018 to May 31, 2018 there have been a total of 6 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of May, there were 14 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were 5 nuisance incidents investigated in May.  From January 1 to May 31, 2018 there have been a total of 39 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 17 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On May 6 and 11, the IFT investigated reports of two elk killed by wolves in Alpine.  The IFT investigated and determined both elk were killed by wolves from the Prime Canyon Pack.  On May 12, an elk was killed in Nutrioso by wolves from the Elk Horn Pack.  There were no interactions between humans and wolves during any of these incidents.  All elk carcasses were removed from private lands.  Concentrations of elk feeding in pasture land in these communities have remained high during this spring due to the forage in the wet meadows as compared with dry conditions on the adjacent ASNF.  The IFT encourages all residents to report any wolf sightings in proximity to residences by calling the phone number listed above.  The IFT continued active hazing efforts of wolves in these areas and maintaining diversionary food caches to disrupt documented patterns of wolves regularly using areas inhabited by humans.  At the time this report was prepared, there have been no additional reports of elk killed by wolves in either of these communities.

On May 8, the IFT investigated a report of an interaction between a wolf and a dog at a residence in Alpine that reportedly had to be broken up by the owner of the dog.  The report was determined to be unfounded.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 15, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the injured calf was confirmed wolf.

On May 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 24, the IFT received a report from a turkey hunter who observed a collared wolf from his camp on national forest near Hannagan Meadow three times during a three hour period on May 21, 2018.  The hunter reported that in the early morning hours he first saw the wolf at a distance of approximately 150 yards away from the camp.  The wolf left, then returned 30 minutes later and was observed approximately 25 yards from the camp.  The wolf left the area on its own, then returned a third time and was observed approximately 40 yards away around 9:00AM.  During this interaction the hunter never yelled or did anything to scare the wolf away.  The hunter was alone at the camp and there were no dogs present in camp.  The hunter indicated there was food present at the camp but he was not cooking at the time the wolf was observed.  The IFT confirmed this interaction involved a collared Mexican wolf from photographs taken during the incident.

On May 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was killed by a bear.

On May 26, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf had been killed by coyotes.

On May 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 29, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 29, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On May 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was killed by a bear.

On May 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation concluded the cause of death was unknown.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On May 2, USFWS presented to various tribes at the New Mexico Tribal Fish, Wildlife, and ESA Conservation Meeting.

On May 8, WMAT presented to the Boys and Girls Club in Whiteriver, AZ

On May 8, WMAT presented to WMAT Forestry Department in Canyon Day, AZ.

On May 10, WMAT presented to the Boys and Girls Club in Whiteriver, AZ

On May 16, the IFT gave a presentation on Mexican wolf biology, management and reintroduction efforts to a group of 6th grade children from Winslow, AZ at their annual camping trip on the ASNF.

On May 17, the Mexican Wolf/Livestock Council met in Springerville, AZ.

On May 24, WMAT presented at Whiteriver Elementary in Whiteriver, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

There are no project personnel updates for the month of May.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

From Jugomaro Predator Park SA (https://www.facebook.com/Jugomaro/)

All of you who love not only wolves but also big cats will remember that quite some time ago we reported about the Jugomaro Park and all the problems the owners had with the piece of land the park was situated on. We did not hear from them for a very long time and already thought they must have lost the battle, but now the park is back to life.

It is now situated at Portion 4 Number 91 in Vaalwater, Tel. 082 558 0703, and you can get more information through their Facebook page  or their website  (not yet active).

But just when they thought everything would be running smoothly now they were hit by another catastrophe. The new start ended in tears for the family that owns the Jugomaro Predator Park in Limpopo, after three of their beloved lions and their prized tiger were poisoned. In the early hours of May 25. Justin Fernandes and his mother Rosa were alerted to trouble when their wolf Bolt started barking. The first cat they checked on was Panjo, the Bengal tiger that made headlines in 2010 when it escaped and was found two days later in a pine forest on the Swartkoppies farm in the Verena area, near Bronkhorstspruit. All the other cats seemed to be okay but then they noticed that the pupils of Elvis, the white male lion, were dilated and that he was choking on something. When the big cat’s condition began to decline rapidly, Justin performed CPR, but to no avail. Elvis shared the enclosure with Kai, a tiger cub who did not respond to Justin’s call. The two animals were inseparable. Kai was dead and had already digested most of his poison in his system. Next, Justin heard his two brown lions, Taariq and his twin brother Hercules, throwing up. While they waited for a vet to arrive from Bela-Bela, Taariq and Hercules died, too. The pelt of a freshly-slaughtered rabbit was found in bushes near the enclosures. The rabbit had been cut up and laced with the poison Temik, also known as Aldicarb or “Two Step”. Had it not been for Bolt waking them up, the cats would probably have been chopped into pieces, too.

Justin said, “It’s like losing your own childrenMy whole life has been around these cats for the past nine years. I can’t really say how angry and frustrated I am and that I could not do what I needed to save them.”

The cats had been moved from Krugersdorp, Gauteng, where they had been situated before, to the farm near Vaalwater, Limpopo, just about 2 weeks ago.

The family ran into financial difficulty in 2015 and lost the park that they had built in Groblersdal. Rosa said they went through an “ugly liquidation” and lost everything. The Red Ants, a security company, were sent to evict the family from the property. They left with just the clothes on their back. The cats were then taken to Krugersdorp, to a friend’s farm. In desperation, Rosa’s husband, Goosey, tried to open a zoo in Springs to save the cats. When he went to look at the place, he fell into an ash pit and suffered third degree burns, was in intensive care for more than two months, and during this time, the family managed to scrape together over R400 000 to buy back their cats. They later lived in a caravan and in tents in Krugersdorp, where the cats were being kept.

The whole family put blood, sweat and tears into these animals. With tears rolling down her face, Maxine, the daughter, said: “We were with Taariq and Hercules when they passed and we were holding them – telling them that we loved them and sorry that we failed them.”

Please open your hearts and pockets to the new park right here in our neighbourhood and donate whatever small money you can spare (big money is also welcome) to the park:

ABSA Bank
Name Maxine Fernndes
Branch code 632005
Savings acc. No. 9171806809
SWIFT code ABSAZAJJ
SMS proof 0825580703
Or through PayPal jugomaro21@hotmail.com

Next Door

Nothing to report.

International

Nothing to report.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in Italy

Bears and wolves at risk in Bolzano, Italy

The bill, just approved, on the proposal of the councillor of agriculture Arnold Schuler, provides for the capture, withdrawal or even killing, in extreme cases, some wolves and bears.

The Provincial Council of Bolzano gave the go-ahead to the draft law on large carnivores, including bears and wolves, by means of a bill titled, “Measures for prevention and intervention concerning large carnivores”. All this has been clarified and must be agreed with the Higher Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA). To announce it, the president of the Provincial Council of Bolzano, Arno Kompatscher said “The Province of Bolzano, stated, will establish the withdrawal of individual specimens, but only as long as there is no other solution and that this does not prejudice the maintenance of the species”.

So, while animal-loving people following the news are in turmoil, the situation (and lives) of bears and wolves, at least in the north of Italy, becomes harsher. The announcement came a few hours before the World Environment and Nature Day, celebrated all over the world.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 150

The Curse of the Full Moon  by Jennifer Tissot

I knew it was coming. The feeling of untamed anxiety told me so, just as it does every month when the moon is at its fullest.

The curse has been with me since I was a child…but how long I’ve been a werewolf doesn’t matter. All that matters is here and now.

The house is silent and dark as I unlock the back door and step out onto the porch and into the cold, frosty February night air. I shiver and see the clear sky with all its winking white eyes and the one single, large, bright eye. It is the moon, huge and white as my fangs are against its milky gleam.

A shudder runs through my whole body, but not from cold. It’s the sign, the first sign of the transformation of my fifteen-year-old body of a girl becoming the animal.

I leap off the porch and into the frozen snow that feels like freezer burnt vanilla ice cream beneath my bare feet.

The prickling sensation traces through my veins…

It happens.

All my bones twist and turn to become a new structure as gray fur spreads across my arms and face like ripples in a pond.

I grow larger, my whole face pushing out…my nose and mouth melting into one to form the snout.

My teeth enlarge and curve as they change into the shining fangs…the ones I’ll use for tearing and biting with.

My fingers shrink and paws replace my hands.

I feel no pain as all this happens to me. Only a feeling of sheer joy and terror all at once as my heart beats faster…so fast I can hardly breathe…

I’m panting, drooling…

On all fours I rush over the white world beneath my wolf paws, into the woods.

So dark and concealing…

I see every flicker of movement within my colourless world, smell every hint of fear, and hear every sound of the alarmed rabbits and deer as they scurry for cover from me.

I reach a hillside and stop for breath.

I throw my head back and let out my howl. IT is long, shrill, and echoes off the trees and mountains beyond.

“I’m here,” I’m saying within the howl, “and I’m hungry.”

Yes. The scent of a human wafts over the sharp breeze in my direction.

I head for it, bounding.

I keep going into the woods until I spot the wandering man, bundled up to keep warm as he sits near a dying camp fire.

I make no sound as I creep toward him.

One paw, then two. The saliva runs thick over my chin. I can’t help it. His scent is intoxicating.

He suspects nothing with his back turned. He rubs his hands over the fading blaze.

I’m so close, inches.

I’m on him! I dig my claws right through his coat…into his warm flesh…

A half strangled scream is all he manages…

Then, I stop and think.

“A partner would be nice,” as I close my jaws around the back of his neck… and bite him long and hard…

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

I have been very busy lately, because we have finally managed to track down our old butcher. He had left his old butchery after too many fights with his partner and started his own butchery, which turned out to be located not too far from us. We had no clue where he had moved to; his old partner didn’t tell because he didn’t want to lose his customers, but with lots of asking around we eventually managed to find him. When we first walked into his new place, we were very nearly hugged by his staff, so pleased were they that we had found them. Luckily, he had not lost his love for wolves, although we had not seen each other for nearly two years. All his old customers have slowly been coming back to him, one by one, not only because of his high-quality meat etc., but surely also because of the rare family-like atmosphere this mountain of a man almost magically affords his customers the moment he addresses them. We were lucky to receive in excess of 100 kg of game off-cuts from him over the past four weeks. The pack is delighted about all the delicacies they can delve in and I’m sure they must have missed our old friend as much as we did. O.k., they love the chicken we get from a chicken farm quite a distance away from us, but boy, that’s nothing compared to fresh game meat and innards, and you should see their excited faces when feeding time approaches.

Otherwise it’s pretty cold up here in the moment and they spend lots of time inside dozing. Although I’m convinced that they cannot really feel the cold as we do, they don’t like the icy wind that’s blowing right now. Maybe it’s just solidarity with us, because we now spend much more time inside than outside – sometimes I wish we could also grow such a nice, thick coat during winter to stay warm without having to wear layers and layers of clothes that seem to be in the way all the time whatever you are doing.

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 163, May 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 163, May 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

Let’s see what we’ve got for you this month. News of crimes against wildlife, of course. It really sickens me every month anew to realize what this beautiful planet has come to as a result of one ultra-aggressive species that thinks it is the ultimate creation because it walks upright, but still can’t see that actions have consequences. Well, I guess, you have to stay up to date…

Our hearts go out to the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary that has recently lost its primary ambassador wolf, Ashak. Everybody who visited the sanctuary in the last years or met them at a function will surely remember this most friendly, splendid wolf who did so much for bridging the perceived gap between people and wolves in South Africa. It truly is a sad loss…

I would like to draw your attention to a contribution by Frans Badenhorst on chipping, chips and scanners that sheds a lot of light on this subject. It was first published in HuskyRomi’s April newsletter and is reprinted here with permission.

A reader has brought to our attention an interesting snippet about canine research results that we have translated for you here, even though it does not (yet) directly relate to wolves. Why do dogs not respond with fear to venomous snakes? We have personally observed two such encounters, one with our two last Groenendaels many years ago, one of which entirely fearlessly killed an adult female rinkhals cobra, and one with Athaba I who had fun playing very skilfully with a baby rinkhals before I noticed, stepped in, caught the snake in my shoe, and released it in a safe place. Mind you, these cobras are short-fused and have a nasty venom.

A personal experience also makes up this month’s wolf tale, this one being retold from early childhood. Oh yeah, those big bad wolves…

To round it all off, Erin tells how she feels about winter while I am ticking off the days until it can be expected to be over.

If you have read it, please post a review of my book, A Houseful Headful of Wolves (German edition: Das Haus Den Kopf voller Wölfe), by following the link on SAFOW’s Facebook page  or directly at http://safow.org/book-review/ . It can be as short or long as you wish, in English or German, and you can remain completely anonymous. I really love to know how it comes across.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest
7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428
Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Early registration – $399.00* (– May 31, 2018)
  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more here.

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here.

 Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Spring Break Camp 
SPRING SESSION: APRIL 3 – 6
For children entering grades 3 – 5  ​
Time: 9AM – 3PM
Fee: $300 per child for the 4-day program (Tuesday – Friday)
Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the center home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here.

Summer Internships for College Students

The Wolf Conservation Center is pleased to offer summer environmental education internship opportunities for college students! The environmental education internship is designed to expose interns to the field of conservation education and wildlife biology. Interns conduct a variety of education programs and assist with the daily operations of the WCC.

Information here.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (website)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!
SUMMER FAMILY ADVENTURE: August 5 – 10, 2018: Details here.
FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018: Details here.

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary Newsletter April 2018

Don’t really know what to say or write, the loss of Ashak, our ambassador wolf, is a huge blow to me and, I know, to a lot of people out there. He was a part of so many lives, he even gave the engagement ring away to lots of couples. I don’t believe that there are many wolves in the world that had as much interaction with people as Ashak did. Thousands of photos have been taken of him, and he touched so many people in his life.

On the rescue scene we were alerted about two different wolves, one in Pretoria at a veterinary practice and one in KZN at a SPCA branch. Unfortunately neither considered HuskyRomi to be suitable alternative accommodation for the animals. I have heard that the one in KZN was pts, but do not know what happened to the one in Pretoria, because we could never manage to speak to anybody but the person answering the phone on that side and were told in no uncertain terms that the wolf had nothing to do with us or us with him. I can but hope that they did find him a home, but have a feeling that he was pts as well.

Late one Sunday afternoon earlier in the month, I received a message in my voice mail from a veterinary practice way on the other side of town in Sandton. As you know, we live in Roodepoort. The lady said that they had one of the wolves staying with us, Wahya, with them. He was picked up as a stray and taken in to them. Well, Wahya was lying right next to me, so I found this very strange. Unfortunately the practice was closed when I called back, so it had to wait for the next day. I just made sure in the meantime about all the information that I have on his microchip and requested an online copy of his registration certificate from Identipet as well. It turned out that somebody must have had numbers swapped or something in that line and that was how our detail was given to the practice. The poor stray animal was micro-chipped, but the chip number was not on the Identipet database, so either the owner never registered him, or the number was issued by a different company and therefore did not show up on the Identipet database. This caused me to look deeper into the microchip chaos in our country (and probably worldwide) with numerous animals running around with microchips that actually cannot be traced.

When Yiska came to stay with us, I immediately had him micro-chipped. The vet implanted a VirBac Backhome microchip and registered him on the Backhome database. I read an article about a batch of Backhome chips that could not be read, and being the paranoid being that I am, took him to a totally different vet just to have him scanned and the chip number confirmed. I also found out that Identipet has a countrywide database and that they are willing to register all microchips on their database, even if they are not Identipet chips. I immediately did that and paid for a lifelong membership with Identipet. When Wahya received his chip (at the same vet), it was a Five Star ID chip. This time I was given the chip detail and a website and told to register him myself. I did it, and also registered him on the Identipet database, paying for a lifelong membership. I originally thought that the type of microchip could be gathered from the chip number, but this is not so, meaning that an animal picked up with a chip from company A, cannot be traced unless the person doing the enquiry calls up company A. It seems to me that, because Identipet started this “universal” database, the vets tend to call them, and probably only them. They have a 24 hour hotline as well as a cell phone app (that I am struggling to get to work, seems to be more IOS friendly than Android). Apparently there are also a number of companies that supplied microchips in the past that have closed their doors and no longer operates. Nobody knows what happened to their databases.

A couple of things came out of this little incident and that is why I am rambling on about it. Firstly, please have your pets micro-chipped. Secondly, make sure that the vet scans the chip and that it corresponds with the number given to you. Then register your pet on the database of the company that supplied the chip (if the vet did not do it, but go and check), but also on the Identipet universal database. I am by no means trying to advertise Identipet, but while they have started delivering this service and with the information that I received, I really want to strongly recommend it. If your animal was chipped previously and you are not sure if the chip still works, or do not have the number, please have him or her scanned and then also register that chip number on the universal database. Then at least you know it will pop up on the primary enquiry should your pet ever be scanned.

The information on the database is not shared with anybody. All they give the vet or the rescuer when they query a number, is the name of the registered owner, the name of the animal, and the primary telephone number. Please also make sure that your phone number is up to date on the database. Only you can access your own information in full, and to get the names and phone number as stated, the person enquiring must be a registered vet or rescue organization and supply their registration number at the time of the request. I think that is safe enough for your pet’s security and worthwhile following up.

One more little thing I discovered. There are chip scanners available on the market that cannot read chips from other companies. I believe that most vets use either Backhome or Identipet scanners and as I read it, they are certified to read all chips currently available as well as the older chips with shorter numbers.

Take care and keep howling.
Frans.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information. If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Wyoming wants to gun down 58 wolves

Wyoming is at it again.

Barely a year after Wyoming wolves lost Endangered Species Act protection, the state is proposing steep increases in the number of wolves allowed to be killed by hunters.

Defenders is going to do what it takes to stop this, but we need your help.

Your urgent donation will help protect Wyoming wolves and other vulnerable wildlife: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=HD48-qHvqwBEB8w8gaN8-w

It was just a year ago last month that a federal court stripped Wyoming’s wolves of Endangered Species Act protection. The court upheld a state plan that declares 84% of the state a “predator zone” where wolves can be hunted or trapped by anyone, at any time.

And wolves aren’t the only animals whose fate Wyoming is recklessly endangering. We recently wrote to you that the state is considering a proposal to allow up to 23 grizzly bears to be hunted in the greater Yellowstone region.

Help stop these outrageous attacks on carnivores like wolves and bears: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=3JTYUXbkCy8ZJe71gH9A-Q

With your help, Defenders is on the ground in Wyoming. We’re pressing state officials to reconsider their actions. With you at our side, we’re rallying conservationists to demand adequate safeguards for wolves and grizzly bears. And thanks to you, we’re keeping the issue of wolf and bear protection front and center as an issue in Wyoming.

Wolves and grizzly bears have no voice of their own. That’s why you and I must speak for them.

Your generous support means you are a full partner in the fight for wildlife protection: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=HaMgkhOOxyaV8fLMkZo4Zg

You know this is a treacherous time for wildlife conservation. And it’s especially treacherous for wolves, which continue to be the victims of outdated and ignorant mindsets.

The hopeful news is that most Americans believe in wildlife protections. And sooner or later, sanity will prevail. But in the meantime, it’s up to all of us do what we can.

Thank you in advance for your support.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

1. Germany: Wolf found shot dead in Pumpak territory – We offer a reward!

Neißeaue, 26.04.2018

On 13 April, our colleague Katarzyna, who is doing wolf research on the Polish side of the Lausitz in the vicinity of Ruszow, discovered the body of a wolf on the banks of the river Neiße. Polish and German police have started a manhunt.
The wolf was most probably shot at the beginning of April, over Easter. The locality is Dobrzyn (on the Polish side), at about the level of Steinbach, Ungunst, Lodenau (Rothenburg OL) on the German side. But this spot may not necessarily be the actual crime scene.
If anybody can provide relevant information, e.g., saw people with rifles along the Neiße or heard one or more shots being fired, please contact the police in Görlitz or Zgorzelec, or Alexander Januszkiewicz through the contact form on our website.
Information that will lead to the arrest of the perpetrator(s) will be rewarded by us (Wolfsschutz Deutschland and Dolnoslaskie Towarzystwo Ochrony Wilkow) with Euro 2000.

We really hope that our reward will contribute to having one of these criminal poachers arrested eventually.
Other than that, we ask you to support this new film project. https://www.gofundme.com/Menschen-fuer-woelfe and to please sign our new petition in which we demand to end hobby hunting: www.change.org/wolfsschutz 

From Center for Biological Diversity via Change.org (change@mail.change.org)

New Petition: Stop Trophy Hunting

Thank you for signing our petition to save wolves by keeping them protected under the Endangered Species Act. We thought you might like to know about our latest petition: we’re trying to end trophy hunting of wolves, grizzlies and elephants. Below is a link to that petition. Thank for your support, and for standing up for wildlife.

Trump’s putting bears, wolves and elephants in the crosshairs of trophy hunters.

Yellowstone’s grizzlies had been safe from trophy hunters for the past 40 years. But last summer Trump stripped them of their Endangered Species Act protection. Now state officials in Wyoming are dead set on letting trophy hunters gun down 24 grizzlies that wander out of the national park. More than half of them could be females, including those pregnant with cubs.

No wild creature should ever be caught in the crosshairs of an AR-15. It’s all part of a trigger-happy culture that fetishizes the thrill-killing of endangered wildlife.

It has to end.

One of Trump’s first acts as president was allowing trophy hunters in Alaska’s national wildlife refuges to slaughter wolves and their pups where they slept, and to bait bears out into the open so they could shoot them from airplanes. Trump has also refused a full-on ban of elephant trophy imports — a step that’s vital to ending the savage killing that’s put elephants on the path toward extinction.

The Center for Biological Diversity is fighting the cruel laws that allow this kind of brutality — and we’re challenging the sick mentality glorified by Trump’s administration and anti-wildlife agencies.

We simply can’t allow grizzlies, wolves, elephants and other wild animals to be thrill-killed into extinction. Wildlife belongs in the wild, not hanging over a fireplace or on a living-room floor.

Join our resistance — sign our petition to stop the slaughter of wildlife being hunted for their heads and skins.

Please sign here.

From Change.org (Salty Dog via Change.org [change@mail.change.org])

USA: Why Trophy Hunters are essentially Cowards

“There is no coming to consciousness without pain. People will do anything, no matter how absurd, in order to avoid facing their own Soul. One does not become enlightened by imagining figures of light, but by making the darkness conscious.”

This quote by Carl.G. Jung outlines the character flaw of trophy-hunters and what Under Armour is deliberately cashing in on, with no hesitation or remorse whatsoever:
Fear of facing their own self, of looking at oneself to see how one can grow as a human being, on how to become a valuable member of society.
Soldiers, policemen, fire fighters, etc, know that they put themselves in harm’s way when they choose their careers, that’s why this is considered noble.
Not so the trophy-hunters, they kill animals for their own perceived glory, be that an animal carcass, the thrill of the rush of having killed something alive, as well as the recognition from fellow trophy-hunters.
They are attention-whores, that’s why they pose with the carcasses, grinning ostentatiously.
They kill from a safe distance without putting themselves in harm’s way; they chase cheap thrills, meaningless accumulations of material and emotional content, i.e. trophies. Self-absorbed children in adult bodies.

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail102.atl71.mcdlv.net); on behalf of Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Ten Rare Red Wolf Pups Born at the WCC

Fewer than 30 Remain in the Wild

Mother’s Day came early this year at the Wolf Conservation Center!

Red wolf F2121 (affectionately nicknamed Charlotte) gave birth to four pups during the afternoon of April 19 and were followed by six pups, born to a different mother (red wolf F1858 or Veronica), just hours later.

With high pitch peeps and squeals, the adorable new residents announced their debut to a global community of onlookers via the WCC’s network of live webcams.

Beyond being cute, the pocket-sized predators represent the WCC’s active participation in an effort to save a species from extinction.

While the WCC has been a vocal and visible advocate in trying to protect and preserve critically endangered red wolves, the center is also active in physically safeguarding representatives of the rare species that have been entrusted to its care.

The WCC is one of 43 facilities in the U.S. participating in the Red Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) – a breeding and management program whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of red wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.

Red wolves, native to the south-eastern United States, were almost driven to extinction by intensive predator control programs and habitat loss.

In 1980, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) captured the last wild red wolves (just 14 animals) and declared the species extinct in the wild.

In 1987, USFWS released the first captive red wolves in North Carolina’s Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge as part of a federal reintroduction program under the aegis of the Endangered Species Act.

Although the red wolf recovery program once served as a model for successful recovery of wolves, political barriers and consistent mismanagement by the USFWS have seriously threatened the continued existence of this highly imperilled species. In its most recent proposal announced in September of 2016, the agency called to remove most of the last wild red wolves to put them in captivity. Beyond effectively undermining decades of wild red wolf recovery, scientists warn that USFWS’s proposal “will no doubt result in the extinction of red wolves in the wild.”

Current estimates put the wild population at the lowest level in decades, down from 130 just four years ago to fewer than 30 today.

Donate today here.

 

2.Wolf Conservation Center ‘Dencam’ Captures Birth of Rare Mexican Gray Wolf Pups!

After welcoming two litters of critically endangered red wolf pups less than two weeks ago, the Wolf Conservation Center is celebrating the arrival of critically endangered Mexican gray wolf pups as well: more info here.

On April 30, first-time parent F1505 (affectionately nicknamed Trumpet for her loud squeals upon her birth in 2016) welcomed three pups. Following in their mother’s footsteps, the noisy newborns entered the world amongst a chorus of sounds. “Trumpet’s solo act has grown into an orchestra of growls, yips, and peeps,” said Regan Downey, WCC Education Director. “The squeaky sounds are not only adorable, but are so rarely heard on the wild landscape.”
There are only 114 wild Mexican gray wolves living in the United States, so every new arrival represents a priceless contribution to the recovery the rare and at-risk species.

The WCC is one of more than 50 institutions in the U.S. and Mexico participating in the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan – a bi-national initiative whose primary purpose is to support the reestablishment of Mexican wolves in the wild through captive breeding, public education, and research.

Because the entire existing Mexican wolf population descended from just seven founders rescued from extinction, genetic health is the primary consideration governing not only reproductive pairings but also captive-to-wild release efforts. Although both components are equally critical to Mexican wolf recovery, release events are far less frequent than successful breeding.
In recent positive steps toward recovery, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has been ushering genetically diverse captive wolf pups into the wilds of Arizona and New Mexico through its pup cross-fostering initiative. Cross-fostering is a coordinated event where captive-born pups are introduced into a similar-aged wild litter so the pups can grow up as wild wolves.
The Mexican wolf newborns, who will not be able to open their eyes for a week or so, are not eligible for wild-foster due to their litter size.
“Although we hoped pups from our center would receive the ‘call of the wild’,” said WCC Curator Rebecca Bose, “We’re elated that there have been foster events from other facilities this year! Cross-fostering is an incredibly effective tool for augmenting the genetic health of the wild population.”
“Maybe next year some lobo pups from the WCC will get this amazing opportunity,” said Maggie Howell, WCC Executive Director. “In the meantime, we’re counting on USFWS to continue with releases beyond pup season because recovery demands releasing more family groups into the wild too.”
The wolf parents and pups are not on public exhibit, but thirteen live webcams, available on the WCC website, invite an unlimited number of viewers to enter the private lives of these elusive creatures.

Join them now via live webcam.

  1. Ambassador Wolf Milestone – It’s Atka’s Sweet 16

License to Thrill (and Educate)

Today Ambassador Wolf Atka turns 16 years old!
The confident and charismatic ambassador has won the hearts and opened the minds of hundreds of thousands of people throughout his storied career.

Although Atka retired from his career as a travelling Ambassador a couple of years ago, he continues to interact with advocates around the world. In May 2017, Atka created his own email account (atka@nywolf.org) and has welcomed a steady stream of passionate emails ever since! He’s Skyped with a budding scientist in Mexico, chatted with conservationists in Europe, and has received fan mail from all seven continents – even Antarctica!
And now with his own set of wheels, his reach knows no bounds! Happy Sweet 16, Atka! We love you!

Thank you, Atka, for allowing the world to form lasting connections with not only you but your wild kin as well!

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – April 1-30, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the web page.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH or www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update
In April 2018, The U.S. District Court of Arizona issued an adverse decision on the revised 10(j) rule litigation, remanding the 2015 10(j) rule to the USFWS. The 2015 10(j) rule will remain in effect for the foreseeable future until the completion of this litigation.

On April 5, staff from the USFWS presented at the Arizona tribal/FWS coordination meeting. Management of Mexican wolves on tribal land was discussed.

From April 9-12, staff from USFWS, AZGFD and New Mexico Department of Game and Fish attended the annual Trilateral committee meeting for wildlife and ecosystem conservation between the United States, Mexico and Canada. Staff presented to the Committee and attended management sessions that were held on Mexican wolf recovery.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS
The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018. The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.  Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.  At the end of April, there were 75 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:
Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338,AF1335, M1676, AND f1683)
In April, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF), and occasionally documented on the SCAR.  Yearling female 1683 continued to make dispersal movements north and east of Bear Wallow’s traditional territory, but frequently rejoined the pack. Alpha female 1335 exhibited behavior and movements consistent with denning.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)
In April, the IFT documented Bluestem in the pack’s traditional territory in the central portion of the ASNF.  Yearling female 1686 has been exhibiting localized behavior and movements suggesting that AF1042, which has a non-functioning collar, may have denned.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, m1671)
In April, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF.  This month, two neonatal pups born in captivity at the Endangered Wolf Center were cross-fostered by the IFT into the Elk Horn den. The IFT initiated a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for livestock-related conflict.  The Elk Horn Pack continued to display behavior consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and AM1447)
In April, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in Arizona and New Mexico.  This month, two neonatal pups born in captivity at the Endangered Wolf Center were cross-fostered by the IFT into the Frieborn den.  The IFT initiated a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for livestock-related conflict.  The Frieborn Pack exhibited behavior and movements consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation was conducted.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677 and m1681)
In April, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT hazed the Hoodoo Pack several times this month in the Nutrioso area to deter them from frequenting areas with residences.  At the end of the month, the IFT initiated a diversionary food cache to reduce potential for conflict.  The Hoodoo Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning within their traditional territory during April.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)
In April, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (F1339, AM1382 and M1574)
In April, the Panther Creek Pack was located in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  Alpha Female 1339 and AM1382 have joined up and have been documented travelling as a pair.  Sub-adult M1574 has been travelling separately from the pack.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AF1562 and AM1394)
In April, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Pine Spring Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning within their territory during April.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AF1488 and AM1471)
In April, the Prime Canyon Pack was documented travelling within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  Alpha female 1488 has been exhibiting behavior and movements consistent with denning behavior.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)
In April, the Saffel Pack was located in their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF.  The Saffel Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning within their traditional territory during April.

 

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)
In April, F1550 of the Hoodoo Pack had localized in the east central portion of the ASNF and has been consistently documented travelling with M1571 formerly of the Diamond Pack.  This pair has been documented travelling together and maintaining a territory for over three months and have been named the Sierra Blanca Pack.

Single collared M1477
In April, M1477 was documented in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489
In April, F1489 was documented travelling in the north central portion of the ASNF
ON THE FAIR:
Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)
In April, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay o Ah Pack (collared M1343, AF1283, f1674)
In April, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.
Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)
In April, M1559 and F1679 were assigned a pack name (Tu dil hil) after three months of travelling together.  They were documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:
Copper Creek Pack
During April, the Copper Creek Pack was not located.  Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack.  Single M1673 was documented travelling within the Copper Creek territory in April.  The IFT is monitoring this to determine if it has joined the pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and M1354)
During April, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the GNF.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)
During April, F1685 has continued to travell with M1453 in the western portion of the CNF for a period of three months, and the pair is now considered the Datil Mountain Pack.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)
During April, AM1038, formerly of the Hawks Nest Pack, has continued to travell with F1473 in north central portions of the GNF for a period of three months. The pair is now considered the Hawks Nest Pack. The IFT documented behavior consistent with denning in mid-April.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240,  AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)
During April, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)
During April, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the southeastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)
During April, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158,  AF1487, and fp1684)
During April, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a food cache for the Luna Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  In late-April, the Luna pack displayed behavior consistent with denning.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and f1664)
During April, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the northwestern portion of the GNF.  The Mangas Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning within their traditional territory. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, F1565, m1669, and m1678)
During April, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The Prieto Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning within their traditional territory.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)
During April, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT documented behavior consistent with denning for the San Mateo Pack in late April.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)
During April, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  AM1284, mp1667 and fp1682 were not located in April.  In late-April, the SBP Pack displayed behavior consistent with denning.

Single collared AM1155
During April, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was not located by the IFT.

Single collared M1486 
During April, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1561
During April, M1561 dispersed into Arizona and continued to make wide dispersal movements on both the ASNF and Coconino National Forests.

Single collared M1673
During April, M1673 travelled throughout the southern portion of the GNF.

MORTALITIES
There were no mortalities documented in April.

INCIDENTS
During the month of April, there were 12 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock.  There were 5 nuisance incidents investigated in April. From January 1 to April 30, 2018 there have been a total of 29 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 11 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On April 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was stillborn.

On April 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow died of natural causes.

On April 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a coyote kill.

On April 5, the IFT took a report of wolves located near an occupied dwelling and livestock in Catron County, NM.  The IFT and Wildlife Services investigated the incident. The IFT provided less than lethal training and rounds to the reporting party.

On April 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 7, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 9 and 10, the IFT received reports of two elk killed by wolves in the Nutrioso, AZ area. Both of the elk carcasses were removed by the IFT to eliminate any further attractant to wolves returning to areas with a concentration of residences.  The IFT resumed efforts to haze wolves that entered the Nutrioso area and focused hazing efforts during nighttime hours. The IFT provided less than lethal training and rounds to five residents in Nutrioso to use to haze wolves if wolves were observed near residences on private property.

On April 11, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 19, Wildlife Service investigated a dead calf in Socorro County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was killed by a coyote.

On April 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a coyote kill.

On April 24, the IFT received a report of an elk killed by wolves in Auger Canyon near a residence and that three wolves were observed feeding on the carcass. The IFT determined from GPS points that the Hoodoo Pack had location points on the elk kill.

On April 27, the IFT received a report of an elk having been killed by wolves approximately 250 yards from the nearest residence in Nutrioso.  The elk was removed from the location. A diversionary food cache was started near the Hoodoo Pack den to mitigate wolves hunting and killing elk in proximity to houses.  Members of the Hoodoo Pack have been using the diversionary food cache regularly. The IFT maintained a presence in the Nutrioso area in effort to haze wolves if they returned to the valley and to visit with residents to provide self-help information on what to do if a wolf was encountered.  The IFT has taken management action in this situation due to the wolves’ repeated use of areas in close proximity to homes. It is important to note that the wolves have not been remaining in the community during the day and on the few occasions when encountered by people, the wolves have run away.

On April 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On April 27, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Greenlee County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf was injured by a bear.

On April 30, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined that the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION
On April 5, WMAT presented to Arizona health professionals in Hon-Dah, AZ

On April 10, WMAT presented on KNNB radio in Whiteriver, AZ.

On April 14, USFWS personnel presented to a group at the Phoenix Zoo.

On April 25, USFWS and AZGFD presented at a meeting held in Springerville hosted by Apache County.

PROJECT PERSONNEL
The USFWS welcomed two new volunteers in March and two in April to the program. During this time, three other volunteers completed their volunteer commitment with the USFWS, moving on to other career opportunities and experiences. Thanks for all your hard work and dedication!

Other News

National

From SanWild Wildlife Trust (lizel=sanwild.org@mail173.suw14.mcdlv.net); on behalf of; SanWild Wildlife Trust (lizel@sanwild.org)

In Loving Memory of Louise Joubert Founder of SanWild

Losing the pillar & a mother everyone leaned on, has meant huge adjustments for everyone involved with SanWild. We are doing what we can to pull together and continue the dream and vision she had.
The animals she saved depend on us to ensure they are fed and cared for. The immediate need is as always the lions and to continue to be able to put out Teff & Lucerne. With 11 lions to feed it is a costly part of the ongoing financial need.
If there are any companies or individuals who would like to sponsor either a lion or a pride on an ongoing basis please do let us know. We are registered as a public benefit organization, which means that donations from within South Africa are fully tax deductible.
We greatly appreciate your support to help continue Louise’s dream through the Memorial Fund, you can donate via the PayPal portal or if you would like to make a direct deposit the banking details are as follows:
Account holder:SanWild Trust
Bank:ABSA
Branch: Danie Joubert Street, Tzaneen,0850.
Bank account nr: 911 122 1180
Branch Code: 334349
Swift Code: ABSAZAJJ
IBAN CODE: ZA632005
Reference: name/memorial fund
Please do email us so we can record your donation or if you have any queries, lizel@sanwild.org

Personally, I would like to thank each and everyone that has contacted me about the passing of my mom. It is amazing to see how many people she touched through the amazing work she has done.
I won’t lie, it is very difficult for me to accept that my mom, is not just a phone call away anymore…and the pain of losing her is still very raw and the emptiness unbearable, but she would have wanted us to be strong and protect what she has build and fought for, for so many years, and that is each and every animal that has found their forever home at SanWild.

My mom had so much knowledge and was so driven, a one in a million type of women that I am very proud of. I might not have all the knowledge that she had but I shared her passion and so did all the other trustees and so many supporters and friends of her and SanWild and through that, WE WILL do everything to keep SanWild up and running.
Please bare with me if I do not get to everyone’s messages right away but please know I will answer everyone soonest.
Thank you for all your support, this really means allot to us.
Kind regards
Lizel Kachelhoffer

Next Door

 From Johnny Rodrigues (newsletter@zimconservationtaskforce.com)

ZCTF Update -April 20th

Yes, you are not dreaming – Johnny is back with his ZCTF reports from Zimbabwe.

Johnny, welcome back – with really missed you!

The previous First Lady, Grace Mugabe, is under investigation for smuggling and exportation of ivory, gold and diamonds out of Zimbabwe. Investigators only touched the tip of the iceberg as it is believed that Ms. Mugabe started smuggling as early as 2005 while serving in her role as First Lady.  Ms. Mugabe had a history of being very friendly with one of the female Chinese Nationals and it is of our opinion that they were likely working together.

ZCTF believes that the investigation into Ms. Mugabe’s alleged smuggling activities should be carried out by an independent agency. We have been following the practices of CIO airport security for a number of years. It is possible that under Ms. Mugabe’s instruction, ivory was smuggled onto planes that flew directly to China under the watchful eye of airport “security.”

After the investigation takes place, if Ms. Mugabe and other senior members of government are found guilty or involved in the smuggling of ivory, they should be prosecuted and brought to justice. Monies derived from the sale of ivory and wildlife should be confiscated and repaid to the National Parks.

The Professional Hunters (PH) fraternity of Zimbabwe lost all ethics of hunting when they killed collared wildlife. Ethical considerations fell to the wayside during the previous regime due to corruption and greed. The death of the big tusked elephant in Gonarezhou can be added to the increasing list of collared animals killed by trophy hunters to include Cecil and Xanda among others. There are too many conflicting reports offered up by researchers, safari operators, hunters and people responsible for collaring the wildlife.  A Memorandum of Understanding between hunters, safari operators and researchers should state that any collared animal should not be shot, killed or disturbed in any manner. People involved in hunting a collared animal should be penalized appropriately to deter others from committing similar actions.

The Professional Hunter involved with the recent killing of the collared big tusked elephant is part owner of the Three Monkeys Restaurant in Victoria Falls. We believe this restaurant is a lucrative business that serves a wide variety of exotic meat and steaks. The procurement and source of the meat served leaves the ZCTF highly suspicious, as no matter what you order in the way of steaks and or meat, they seem to have it. People should be aware that in many instances they are eating wildlife.

ZCTF just learned that four lions and ten hyenas have been captured for export to China. These numbers are in addition to the eighteen hyenas and ten lions exported earlier to China. China placed a new order for an additional 200 baby elephants. The new order for 200 baby elephants is in addition to the outstanding order of 100 baby elephants that remain to be captured. This is NOT conservation.

Earlier in February, four crocodiles were captured in Hwange to be exported to China. This capture occurred under the new President. It appears nothing much has changed at this point. Perhaps positive changes for conservation will happen with the election of a new democratic government.

In addition to the loss of wildlife due to poaching and hunting; habitat loss is at an all-time high through deforestation. Trees, indigenous to Zimbabwe, are being felled. These trees and timber are being exported out of Zimbabwe to China. This has to stop.

CITES gave their constitution, governing rules and regulations to the world.  Too many regulations are being broken and ignored in Africa. Nothing is being done. Where is CITES as the habitats and wildlife are being pillaged in Africa?

See our  new ZCTF Video –  Click Here To Watch

 Please feel free to contact me: 

Johnny Rodrigues at ZCTF: Phone: 351 962 064 646 

Email- Admin1@zimconservationtaskforce.com 

Skype: Johnny Rodrigues44  

International

Nothing to report.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

How do Wolves react to venomous snakes?
Why are dogs not scared of snakes?
by Jan Dönges

Most people shun contact with snakes, even if they have never made bad experiences with reptiles. This instinctive aversion is probably an evolutionary artefact of our past and meant to protect us from dangerous strikes. With dogs, it is a different story entirely: Much to the distress of their owners, they will often approach a snake without any partiality. In Europe, the common adder may pose a risk to them occasionally, but in the US, thousands of strikes, mainly by rattlesnakes, are recorded every year.

Curiosity is the driving force behind how these encounters play out, that is what a team of researchers headed by Michele Mulholland from the California State University in San Marcos thinks. Their experiments even demonstrated that the scent of a venomous snake was more attractive to dogs than that of a harmless one.

Their publication in the journal Applied Animal Behaviour Science describes how a total of 117 domestic dogs responded to four different scent samples and inspected them. These samples had been created by placing a mouse, a slug, a non-venomous snake represented by a boa constrictor, and a venomous rattlesnake on sheets of newspaper until their scents had been transferred to them. While the mouse scent was clearly the most attractive one to the dogs, it also showed that the scent of the venomous reptile was more attractive than that of the harmless one. The scent of the slug attracted the least interest.

To find out whether the dogs experienced fear when they sniffed the samples, it was recorded by which nostril they inspected the individual scents. The background for this is results from previous studies that indicated that dogs will analyse scents suggesting danger primarily with the right nostril and thus with the right side of the brain. In the current experiments, however, the dogs took in all scents with both nostrils, suggesting they did not experience fear.

These results are enigmatic from a perspective of evolutionary biology. Why do dogs lack an inheritent fear of snakes even though strikes from venomous ones have been harming them on a regular basis? Dogs, and their wild ancestors, have had contact with snakes forever, which means they had enough time to develop and genetically embed an appropriate protection mechanism. Has this mechanism perhaps been subsequently lost during the thousands of years of domestication?

Answers could possibly be found in a follow-up experiment using wolves. Should these not be afraid of snakes either, then it might be presumed that these reptiles do not pose too much of a threat to them after all. A wild wolf may also be much more careful in an encounter with a snake than a wired dog intent on playing. Alternatively, the answer might lie with the snakes: Being ambush hunters, they depend on not giving away their presence by their scent, neither to their prey nor to their predators. They might therefore mask constituents in their scents that may be detected as warning signals by other animals. This type of chemical camouflage has already been demonstrated to exist in the case of the African puffadder.

The question that for now remains to be answered is: How do wolves respond to venomous snakes?

The full article can be found here.

Or in the German Journal Spektrum der WissenschaftMade available by Dipl.-Biol. Birgit Rödder, www.catility.deTranslated here from German

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 150

Mother Wolf Lassie
by ISMA

I would like to share the true story as a salute to my “mother wolf Lassie”.

I was born in Germany and had a nanny in my first early years. Her husband was a captain on a big ship.

Around 1950, he brought a wolf baby back from one of his journeys. This wolf was raised with a lot of problems and a lot of love. In 1958, I was living in their house and the wolf called Lassie was a good friend of mine. I was 2 years old and one day I crawled into the house of the wolf in the garden, enjoying her scent and beautiful eyes, and I eventually fell asleep lying behind her. My poor nanny was looking for me for a long time. She wondered why Lassie did not come out of her house until she discovered that I was lying behind her. She couldn’t touch me and all she could do was wait. When I woke up I crawled outside and Lassie followed me. The heart of my Nanny stood almost still when she saw us both. An unusual friendship began. I walked with her, slept with her, and I loved her very much.

I will never forget her beautiful eyes and the last time I saw her before she died, her golden green eyes full of wisdom and love.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Winter has arrived – the days are still pleasantly warm, but the nights speak another language. It’s a bit early for my taste, but who cares about my opinion?

With the days getting shorter and shorter the pack is also preparing for wintertime, coming into the house much earlier now in the evenings, cuddling up on the couches, sleeping longer in the mornings, and demanding bigger rations of food.

Today the weather is very strange; we woke up to hardly any daylight, only 11 ºC and pouring rain. The furry kids just lifted their heads, peeked out of the window and decided it was the right weather for stay in bed. They have my full sympathy and I wish I could also just sleep the day away, but unfortunately human day schedule does not care about the weather. Ted and I had to get up, wrap up in warm clothes and start to go about our business with an envious look at the kids curling up on the bed, closing their eyes, and not giving a damn.

I don’t mind the late rain, for it actually saves me the extra work of watering the garden, but I hate this dimmed grey light with not a hint of sunshine and the cold temperatures. I’m not made for winter, hehe.

Otherwise we are all fine and healthy, and when I think about it, it could be worse – it could be snowing…

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 162, April 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 162, April 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

Here comes another big fat newsletter. Wolf news from around the world make up the bulk, but for a change, there are some positive news from the US. It doesn’t mean, of course, that this section would be free of crass bad and even outright perverse news. The Horror Clown plays a key role here as well. As always, I can only recommend you read through it for yourself to know what’s going on on this poor planet.

We also have a write-up on the wolves in Oregon, and a short story worth reading. Erin updates us on her pack, this time illustrating a musical facet.

And lastly a short reminder that there is also news regarding my own book, A Houseful Headful of Wolves (German edition: Das Haus Den Kopf voller Wölfe), in that there are now links on SAFOW’s Facebook page and on the SAFOW website  for submitting book reviews: http://safow.org/book-review/. Here you can post a short review in English or German without even having to register. We are looking forward to receiving your reviews because we really want to know your thoughts on this book.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest
7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428
Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Early registration – $399.00* (– May 31, 2018)
  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more here.

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs.

 Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Spring Break Camp 
SPRING SESSION: APRIL 3 – 6
For children entering grades 3 – 5  ​
Time: 9AM – 3PM
Fee: $300 per child for the 4-day program (Tuesday – Friday)
Information & registration HERE.

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the center home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here.

Summer Internships for College Students

The Wolf Conservation Center is pleased to offer summer environmental education internship opportunities for college students! The environmental education internship is designed to expose interns to the field of conservation education and wildlife biology. Interns conduct a variety of education programs and assist with the daily operations of the WCC.

Information here.

 

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (website)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

SUMMER FAMILY ADVENTURE: August 5 – 10, 2018: Details here.

FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018: Details here.

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (newsletter February 2018; Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

We are happy to report that wolf Philly has survived the Rinkhals bite, and that a log cabin has been build in the sanctuary for those who don’t like to sleep in a tent. It has two single beds, light and much more, which will be very nice in winter.

There is a new limited Destiny bumper sticker available with a picture of Seth; contact the Husky Romi Wolf Sanctuary to get one; only 100 will be printed.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here.

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Lobos celebrate 20 years back in the wild

In 1998, I was in Alpine, Arizona as we released 11 Mexican gray wolves, or lobos, into the wild for the first time since they had been wiped out in the mid-1970s. Tomorrow marks 20 years since that fateful day – a day filled with so much hope for lobos.

It’s a day I am happy I can share just a little bit with you now – through this short video.

As I reflect on the unforgettable memories of that day, and look at where we are now, I see that despite our high hopes as we began this journey, this incredible wolf species continues to face an uncertain future.

It’s clear that lobos still need our help – and our commitment – to fully recover in the wild.

That’s why I wanted to share this short video about the lobo with you, so that you might be as inspired to protect these animals as I am: Take action.

Today just 114 wolves are found in the Southwest United States. Their future depends on more wolf reintroductions, greater connectivity with populations in Mexico and habitat expansion into the Rockies and the Grand Canyon – all things their new “recovery plan” fails to deliver.

Releasing those wolves 20 years ago was truly a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It was remarkable to see them begin their journey to reclaim the land they once roamed. I knew then – as I do now – that I will do whatever it takes to see them thrive again and I know you will too.

Help us make Mexican gray wolf recovery one of the greatest wildlife success stories of our time: Take action.

 

  1. USA: 20 years in: Are lobos losing the fight?

It was supposed to be a Cinderella story, but 20 years after their reintroduction into the wild, the recovery of Mexican gray wolves is far from its fairytale ending.

Mexican gray wolves are down, but not out. Help us give them the ending they deserve: Take action.

In 1998, I found myself in Alpine, Arizona opening the crates that would give Mexican gray wolves – or lobos – a new lease on life. It was remarkable to play a role in bringing lobos back to the American landscape. But I knew even in that moment of pure joy, they faced a tough road ahead.

Today their population continues to struggle to find a foothold. Political ill-will and illegal killings – the number one threat to lobos – still plague the species’ recovery. Just last month, two lobos were found dead in Arizona – a male and a female.

Lobos are on a collision course with disaster. We need your urgent support to give lobos the future they were promised: Help save Lobos.

This could be the defining moment for the future of Mexican gray wolves.

With their numbers in the wild hovering just above 100, lobos remain one of the most endangered mammals in North America.

In order for lobos to have a fighting chance, more wolves need to be introduced into the wild, they need greater connectivity with populations in Mexico and opportunities to expand their habitat into the Rockies and the Grand Canyon. Tragically, their new fatally-flawed “recovery plan” fails to address these needs – and the proposed construction of a border wall would only make their situation more dire.

Help us turn the tide for lobos facing potential disaster: Take action.

Defenders is suing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service over their “Mexican gray wolf recovery plan” that would tip the scales toward ruin.

We won’t give up on the promise made 20 years ago when lobos were restored to the wild. Defenders is fighting for lobos – just as we always have – but the challenges are mounting and we need more help than ever before.

Will you answer the call for lobos caught in the crosshairs? Take action.

Their recovery is achievable and I know it will happen, but we are going to have to continue to fight hard for these amazing animals.

  1. USA: A major victory for wolves!

Yesterday a federal judge decided in our favor and forcefully rejected the catastrophic Mexican gray wolf management rules written by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

This is a major victory for lobos – and we couldn’t have done it without the help of supporters like you!

The judge squarely decided that the management rules unlawfully imposed roadblocks to the recovery of Mexican gray wolves (or lobos), arbitrarily imposed population caps, blocked lobos from accessing habitat necessary for their recovery and made it easier to kill them in the wild.

This decision is an important next step for lobos’ continued recovery. And we have you to thank for it – because without your support we couldn’t have made it this far. But the fight isn’t over.

Help Defenders continue our work to restore lobos and other imperiled species here.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

1. Germany: Wolf cubs in Thuringia shot by order of the government. Please help!

Once again German politic has dissociated itself from law and order and taken guidance from the interests of lobbyists. In Thuringia, three of the six hybrid pups were shot, although they should actually have been captured and moved to the Alternativer Bärenpark (“Alternative Bear Park”). We could have lived with this solution, even if this decision was marked by hysteria rather than reasonable management of wild animals.

These six hybrid cups were said to be a threat to the “pure breeding” of Germany’s wolves – and this in our country? A “threat” to “pure breeding” is, from an arithmetically point of view alone, almost impossible. The reproduction rate of our wolves is still below 30%, which means in other words that most of the pups do not even reach their second year of age.

According to the media, this whole exercise has cost the tax payer about Euro 100,000, and furthermore they stated:
“The animals were captured by a contracted trapper, who had placed baits on the army training grounds Ohrdruf to lure the animals into snares. They were then shot by hunters whose identities are kept secret by the ministry.”

This passage was later removed from the online report, but if this statement is true, and there are indications that they, it would be a genuine scandal. Why shoot the pups dead if they already had a place in the bear park?

We from Wolfsschutz Deutschland (Wolf Protection Germany) have laid charges against minister Siegesmund and the unidentified shooters, because hybrid pups are as strictly protected by law as are “true” wolves.
You can read more here.

Every citizen can lay charges at no costs against the minister and the shooters here.

You can also find updated information in our Facebook group here.

 

  1. The surviving wolf cubs are to be shot, too. Here is how you can help!

Three of the wolf hybrid pups were shot last week, now the surviving three are to follow. The Thuringian minister for Environmental Affairs, Siegesmund, sees herself in the right and states that they have permission from the DBB-Wolf (www.dbb-wolf.de), but we have laid charges against her. The DBB-Wolf is made up of the Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety, the federal agency for Nature Conservation Senckenberg and Leibnitz institution, as well as the LUPUS institution, which is financed by the Saxon Ministry for Agriculture, the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation, the Federal Forest Administration, and IFAW. One could therefore be so naughty as to claim that they have given permission for the shooting to themselves. The fact of the matter is that not one single independent institution in Germany is responsible for wolves.

There have always been hybrids, a fact that is also stated in a brand-new publication by the Senckenberg Institute. Even whales ignore “racist laws”, as you can read here.
Instead of shooting the black Thuringian wolf pups, Thuringian politics should rather ensure that dog owners won’t let their dogs roam free in Ohrdruf without being heavily fined.

Unfortunately laying charges against the minister will not protect the remaining three pups from being shot; for that an emergency appeal or restraining order were necessary. But such a court order can only be obtained by recognized environmental associations, which have the right to sue. This is a very complicated right, and the associations that would like to lay charges are not allowed to do so, and the ones that are allowed don’t want to do it. We would therefore like to support a small environmental association to save the hybrid pups. The media have published an article about that, but the reason why it is so difficult to find a cooperative partner has not been mentioned: details here.

NABU Thuringia have told us that they preferred if we did not mention that the Thuringia NABU-collaborator did not support the “killing” of the pups but the “removal” – how cynical is that: so far all “removed” wolves ended up dead.

We appeal to the common sense and the compassion of minister Siegesmund. Please, let the remaining hybrid pups live.
Please send your appeals via mail to: info@anja-siegesmund.de

From Change.org (Heather L. via Change.org (change@mail.change.org)

USA: Appropriations Bill Passed Without Anti-Lobo Rider!

Victory! The anti-lobo rider was not included within the Omnibus Appropriations Bill when it was passed by Congress! Thank you to everyone who fought against the anti-lobo rider – this victory would not have been possible without your help!
While we celebrate this victory, we should keep in mind that Congress may try to delist Mexican Gray Wolves again in the future, so we must keep an eye on them and ensure that they do not get away with this!

From Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition (action@endangered.org)

  1. USA: Great Lakes wolves to remain protected!

I have an update–and my sincere thanks–for you today. We have learned in the last hour that policy riders that would have delisted Great Lakes wolves have been eliminated from the final version of the omnibus spending bill! This is fantastic news and means that wolves in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin will not face hunting and trapping seasons in the near future!

This is an enormous win for both Grey wolves and for the Endangered Species Act. Had the War on Wolves Act rider advanced, it would have paved the way for even more politically-based listing decisions. We have heard from allies in Congress that senators and representatives received thousands of emails, phone calls, and tweets asking them to keep these wolves protected. The bill is not perfect. It contains concerning language about greater sage grouse and the border wall, but have no doubt – this is a huge, huge win. This victory for wolves would not have been possible without you. Thank you for standing up for wolves and for being an active member of the conservation community.

  1. PETITION: Tell the Trump Administration to save lobos

This LoboWeek  marks the 20th anniversary of the release of 11 captive-reared Mexican gray wolves (or lobos) into the wilds of Arizona and New Mexico. Hunting, trapping, and poisoning caused the extinction of lobos in the wild three decades before this effort to bring them back.

Add your name to tell the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) to release more lobos here.

In the twenty years that followed that release, lobos have slowly come back to the Southwest but progress has been limited by the politics of state agencies and anti-wolf special interests. Today, the wild population stands at 114 wolves. In 2017, 12 wolves died in unexplained circumstances and another was killed by the USFWS.

If lobos are ever to come back, the USFWS and states of the Southwest need to commit to their recovery. Additional locations must be established for lobos to be released into.

Sign the LoboWeek petition asking the USFWS to release more lobos into the wild  here.

We know that the public supports these wolves. Our analysis demonstrated that 99 percent of people submitting public comments support lobo recovery efforts. In spite of that, the recently-released recovery plan from the Trump Administration does the bare minimum under the law. Please join us in asking the USFWS to focus on bringing lobos back by releasing more lobos  here.

Thank you for your commitment to wildlife and wild places.

From Change.org (Salty Dog via Change.org [change@mail.change.org])

  • USA: One Year Ago the US-Senate Voted to Kill Wolf Pups and Hibernating Bears. The Law is still in effect
  • One year ago today, the US-Senate passed S.J. RES. 18 by a vote of 51 to 47 to allow the Killing of Denning Wolves and their Pups, Hibernating Bears, and other Predators on National Refuges Land in Alaska. Trump signed it into law without hesitation.
    THIS LAW IS STILL IN EFFECT!
    All 51 Republicans and one Independent voted in favor, all 47 Nays were Democrats and 1 Independent.
    Vote them out of office coming November.
  • Read the full article here.

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail102.atl71.mcdlv.net); on behalf of Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Victory – Great Lakes Wolves to Remain Protected

Policy riders that would have eliminated Endangered Species Act protections for Grey wolves in 4 states were dropped from the final version of the omnibus spending bill (see details here)!

A Victory for Wolves and the Endangered Species Act!

You did it! Congress heard your howls!

Every voice raised in support of wildlife and wild places can make a difference. And when we all work together, we can make big things happen! None of this would have been possible without your calls, emails and the leaders in Congress who stand for wolves!

  1. USA: It’s LoboWeek – Celebrating 20 years of Mexican Gray Wolves in the Wild. Celebrating a Wild Milestone

On March 29, 1998, 11 captive-reared Mexican gray wolves were released to the wild for the first time in Arizona and New Mexico. Missing from the landscape for more than 30 years, the howl of the rarest and most unique subspecies of gray wolf was once again greeted by the mountains of the south-west.
March 2018 marks the 20th anniversary of this historic event, a significant milestone for the lobo and wildlife conservation!

In recognition of the anniversary, the Wolf Conservation Center is among a growing group of partners participating #LoboWeek, an international movement to educate people about the Mexican wolf, or “lobo,” and our efforts to successfully restore this critically endangered predator to its ancestral home in the wild.

All week long, the WCC was celebrating on social media with interesting lobo facts, ways to take action, special events, “Lobo Loot” giveaways and more!

  1. USA: Hope For Mexican Gray Wolves

The last hope for Mexican gray wolves lies in the hands of conservationists.
The Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) or “Lobo” is the most genetically distinct lineage of wolves in the Western Hemisphere, and one of the most endangered mammals in North America.
The critically endangered predator almost vanished from the face of the earth in the mid-20th century because of human persecution. The entire population of Mexican wolves alive today descends from just seven individuals that were captured and placed into a captive breeding program before the species was exterminated from the wild.
Twenty years ago, 11 captive-reared lobos were released to the wild for the first time in Arizona and New Mexico. Missing from the landscape for more than 30 years, the howl of the rarest and most unique subspecies of gray wolf was once again greeted by the mountains of the south-west.
As the result of a reintroduction program, today there is a single population of approximately 114 Mexican wolves existing in the wild in the United States. However, the reintroduced population suffers from high mortality due to illegal killing and compromised genetics because of its brush with extinction.
For almost two decades, the Wolf Conservation Center has played a critical role in preserving and protecting these imperiled predators through carefully managed breeding, research, and reintroduction. To date, the WCC remains one of the three largest holding facilities for Mexican gray wolves and three wolves from the Center have been released to their ancestral homes in the wild.
In 2014, Earthjustice—on behalf of the Wolf Conservation Center, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, retired Fish Wildlife Service Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator David R. Parsons,  and the Endangered Wolf Center  — filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for failing to develop a recovery plan. A settlement of that lawsuit led to the issuance of the Mexican wolf recovery plan that the same plaintiffs are now challenging. We’re asking a federal judge to order the government to develop a Mexican wolf recovery plan that legitimately responds to recovery needs for the species as the law requires.

  1. Man Armed with Semiautomatic Rifle Guns Down Family of 10 Wolves

Denali Wolves Need Your Voice

Although it’s illegal to hunt and trap wolves within Denali National Park, wolves are vulnerable as soon as they cross the park’s invisible boundary. A man armed with a semiautomatic rifle recently gunned down a family of 10 wolves near the park’s border.

It’s too late for these 10 wolves, but we can’t give up on protecting the others who call Denali National Park home. Please take action today.

Take Action here.

Wolves in Alaska are not protected under state or federal law. Thus, despite the fact that hunting and trapping are illegal within Denali National Park itself, wandering wolves are vulnerable when they slip beyond the park’s border.

On March 30, 2018, Alaska officials issued an emergency order closing the wolf hunting and trapping season on state land adjacent to the eastern boundary of Denali over concerns that excessive kills may destabilize this iconic wolf population.

A few days later photos surfaced showing a man armed with a semiautomatic rifle displaying ten wolf carcasses outside Denali.

For several years now, there has been a notable decline in the number of wolf sightings in Denali and research indicates that wolf mortality rates in the park have recently spiked to worrying levels, with the lowest estimated wolf density recorded since monitoring began in 1986.

Meanwhile, the percentage of sightseers who have spotted a wolf has dropped from 45% to just 5%.

It’s time for the state to make changes.

Please join us and demand Alaska to restore a no hunting/trapping buffer adjacent to Denali National Park!

Take action here.

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – March 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf . For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign upto receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH or www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On March 24, 2018 Sherry Barrett retired from the position of Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator for the USFWS. The IFT thanks Sherry for her leadership and dedication to Mexican wolf recovery efforts during her 7 years as coordinator. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator position will be filled by temporary acting assignments until a new coordinator is hired.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lowercase “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018. The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups. At the end of March, there were 75 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, AF1335, m1676, and fp1683)

In March, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF), and occasionally documented on the SCAR. Female pup 1683 made dispersal movements north of Bear Wallow’s traditional territory, but rejoined the pack by the end of the month.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In March, the IFT documented Bluestem in the pack’s traditional territory in the central portion of the ASNF. Yearling female 1686 was captured, collared, and released on site.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, fp1668, and mp1671)

In March, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Frieborn Pack (collared F1443 and m1447)

In March, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in Arizona and New Mexico.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, f1550, mp1666, mp1677, and mp1681)

In March, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT hazed the Hoodoo Pack several times this month in the Nutrioso area to deter them from frequenting areas with residences. Sub-adult f1550 was documented travelling apart from the Hoodoo Pack with m1571 in the month of March.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In March, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AF1339, AM1382, and m1574)

In March, the Panther Creek Pack was located in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The members of the pack have been travelling separately. Sub-adult m1574 has been occasionally documented travelling on the SCAR.

Pine Spring Pack (collared F1562 and AM1394)

In March, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared F1488 and m1471)

In March, the Prime Canyon Pack continued to travell within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, mp1661, and mp1680)

In March, the Saffel Pack was located in their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared m1477

In March, m1477 was documented in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In March, F1489 was documented travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared m1571

In March, m1571 was documented in the north central portion of the ASNF. Sub-adult m1571 has been documented travelling with Hoodoo f1550 during the month of March.

Single collared m1673

In March, m1673 made wide dispersal movements into New Mexico and has been documented travelling in the south central portion of the ASNF.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and mp1672)

In March, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and fp1674)

In March, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.

Single collared wolf m1559

In March, m1559 was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR with f1679, and occasionally using the SCAR.

Single collared wolf f1560

In March, f1560 was documented travelling with the Baldy Pack in the eastern portion of the FAIR and north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1679

In March, f1679 was documented travelling with m1559 in the eastern portion of the FAIR, and occasionally using the SCAR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (collared AM1386)

During March, the Copper Creek Pack was documented travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF), within the pack’s traditional territory. In March, AM1386 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During March, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the GNF.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During March, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During March, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293, AF1346, and m1561)

During March, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness. Male 1561 continued to make dispersal movements within the GNF.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During March, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a food cache for the Luna pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and fp1664)

During March, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT initiated and maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict. The IFT documented three uncollared wolves with the Mangas Pack

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, f1565, mp1669, and mp1678)

During March, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and fp1578)

During March, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)

During March, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared AM1038

During March, AM1038 of the old Hawks Nest Pack continued to travel with f1473 in north central portions of the GNF.

Single collared AM1155

During March, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was not located by the IFT.

Single collared M1453

In March, M1453 was documented travelling within the western portion of Cibola National Forest (CNF) with f1685.

Single collared f1473

During March, f1473 was documented travelling in north central portions of the GNF with AM1038.

Single collared m1486

During March, m1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared m1569

During March, m1569 travelled widely in New Mexico and was located dead. The incident is under investigation.

Single collared f1685

During March, f1685 was documented travelling with M1453 in the western portion of the CNF.

MORTALITIES

In March, M1386 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

In March, m1569 was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

From January 1 to March 31, 2018 there have been a total of four documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of March, there were 11 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were five nuisance incidents investigated in March, three of which were confirmed as wolf by the IFT. From January 1 to March 31, 2018 there have been a total of 22 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 4 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On March 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Sierra County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Socorro County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 6, WMAT investigated an injured calf on the FAIR. The investigation determined .the probable cause of injury to be wolf.

On March 8, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows on the SCAR. The investigations determined both cows were confirmed wolf kills.

On March 8, the IFT investigated reports of three wolves feeding on a dead elk in the Chapache housing area in Alpine. The IFT responded and located two recently killed elk in an open field near several houses. The wolves had left by the time the IFT arrived. The IFT learned that the wolves were scared away when a homeowner walked out of their house. The remains of the elk carcass were removed from the area to eliminate the attractant of wolves returning to the area. Other homeowners in the area were contacted by the IFT and advised of their legal rights under provisions in the Federal Final 2015 10(j) rule to protect domestic dogs and livestock from wolves. Private land owners or their designee can shoot wolves that are in the act of biting, killing, or wounding domestic animals (livestock or non-feral dogs) on non-federal land (private, tribal, or state land). Any form of harassment or shooting of Mexican wolves must be reported within 24 hours to the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by telephone 505-346-2525; or fax 505-346-2542.

On March 9, WMAT investigated a dead heifer on the FAIR. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown causes.

On March 11, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 12, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was killed by coyotes.

On March 12, the IFT took a report of a dead elk in Nutrioso near Hulsey Creek. The IFT investigated the carcass and did not have any evidence to confirm that the elk had been killed by wolves. There were no GPS points from wolves in the area during the time when the elk would have died. The carcass was removed from the area.

On March 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 14, the IFT took a nuisance report of wolves coming into a camp north of Alpine. The reporting party indicated they had heard howling close to their camp and thought animals may have come into their camp at night while sleeping. The IFT confirmed from GPS points that the Elk Horn Pack was in the area that night, but did not have evidence to corroborate that wolves had come into the camp.

On March 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a probable wolf kill.

On March 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow died from unknown causes.

On March 20, the IFT received a report that wolves had killed an elk in Dry Valley in Nutrioso. The IFT responded to the area and confirmed the Hoodoo Pack had killed an elk in the area approximately 100 yards from the nearest residence. While in the area, several people were contacted who reported seeing wolves on the elk carcass and travelling back into the forest that morning. The remnants of the elk carcass were removed to eliminate further attractant of wolves to the area. Because this was the second confirmed elk kill this month by the Hoodoo pack in proximity to houses, the IFT initiated multiple and sustained hazing efforts on members of the Hoodoo pack in effort to increase their aversion to areas with human presence. Several residents in the area were also issued less than lethal rounds to use to haze any wolves that return to the area of Dry Valley.

On March 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 23, WMAT investigated a dead cow on the FAIR. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown causes.

On March 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown causes.

On March 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On March 30, Wildlife Services investigated an injured domestic dog in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation confirmed the dog’s injuries were caused by wolves several days prior. The IFT responded to the area on the following day and initiated monitoring efforts in the area that remain ongoing at the time of this writing. The IFT confirmed there were no wolves with functional radio collars and no known wolf packs in the area at the time of the incident.

On March 30, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation confirmed the calf’s injuries were caused by wolves.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On March 15, WMAT presented at an Integrated Natural Resources Group meeting in Whiteriver, AZ.

On March 22, WMAT presented to BIA Fort Apache Fire Management personnel in Whiteriver, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

There are no project personnel updates for March.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

Nothing to report.

Next Door

From Change.org (Salty Dog via Change.org [change@mail.change.org])

Kenya: The last male Northern White Rhino has died

Sudan was a captive male northern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) who lived from 1975 to 2009 in the Dvůr Králové Zoo in Czechia from where he was moved to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia, Kenya.

At the time of his death, he was one of the last three living northern white rhinos worldwide and the last known male of his kind. On the 19th March 2018 he was euthanized after suffering from “age-related complications”.

Sudan was two years old when he and another five northern white rhinos were captured in Shambe, in Sudan, by animal trappers. The captured group comprised two males (Sudan and Saut) and four females (Nola, Nuri, Nadi and Nesari).

At that time the number of northern white rhinos was already considered to be only around 700 animals in the wild. For many environmentalists, leaving the animals in nature was the only acceptable way of preserving the already rare subspecies, and the Dvůr Králové Zoo and their Chipperfield partners were heavily criticized for the capture. The zoo was specializing in African fauna and already displayed one of the largest collections out of Africa.

In 1975 Sudan and his group were shipped to the Dvůr Králové Zoo, which was the only zoo in the world where northern white rhinos were successfully bred. Their last calf was born in 2000.

Two years later Nasima joint the group. Nasima originated from Uganda and had lived in the Knowsley Safari Park near Prescot.

At the beginning of 1990 the northern white rhinos in Uganda and Sudan were wiped out; the only 13 still alive were living in the Garamba National Park in Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo).

In 1986 the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group of the IUCN met in the Dvůr Králové Zoo to discuss ways to preserve last northern white rhinos; they decided to import Ben (an older male from London) to return Saut (a calf from the original 1975 group) from the San Diego Zoo to the Dvůr Králové Zoo. Attempts to add several southern rhinos to the group resulted in only mixed success. Several surgeries were performed on the females and their eggs to preserve genetic material, including Sudan’s semen.

Sudan fathered three calves and became the grandfather of one. The Dvůr Králové rhinos were getting older and after 2000 no more calves were being born around the world.

In June 2008 specialists again met in the Dvůr Králové Zoo to decide further steps to save the subspecies. In cooperation with the IUCN African Rhino Specialist Group (AfRSG), the World Zoo and Aquarium Association WAZA, the Berlin institute IZW as well as experts from the Vienna Veterinary institute and the European Zoo and Aquarium Association it was recommended to move Sudan and his group from Czechia to Africa. Substantial debate succeeded and strong objections were raised against this proposal, especially given the fact that expert and scientific organizations were available in Europe and insemination efforts could have continued in Czechia.

In December 2009 the rhinos, together with three other northern white rhinos, were moved to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy for a breeding program named “Last Chance To Survive”. It was hoped that Ol Pejeta would provide a more natural habitat and better hormonal balance for the animals to induce breeding, but all breeding attempts with Sudan at Ol Pejeta Conservancy were unsuccessful.

After Suni, one of the other three rhinos in the group, died in 2014 Sudan spend the final years of his life together with his daughter Najin and granddaughter Fatu.

At the end of 2017, Sudan suffered from an infection in his right hind leg, and although his condition improved over the following months, the infection returned and caused a serious deterioration of his condition in March 2018. Despite intensive care Sudan had to be euthanized on 19th March 2018.

In the weeks before Sudan’s death, Richard Vigne, CEO of the Ol Pejeta Conservancy, stated that “Sudan has been technically infertile for many years, so him dying is not going to affect the possibilities of recovery for the northern white rhino as a species.”

  1. US-Trophy Hunters Killed Rare Black Rhinos for $350.000 and $200.000 Respectively

Texas-based SAFARI CLUB INTERNATIONAL sells these hunts to its members as rare opportunities to kill something endangered before it’s gone. They are the organization behind these demented hunters.
Corey Knowlton from Texas paid $350.000,- and Michael Luzich of Las Vegas, NV paid $200.000,- for killing one of the most endangered animals in the world.

Read the full story here.

International

Nothing to report.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in Oregon, USA

(a summary of three articles by Zach Urness)

State wildlife officials issued a permit that allows the killing of two wolves from an Eastern Oregon pack blamed for attacking livestock.

The Pine Creek Pack attacked and killed two calves and injured four more in early April, according to state reports.

The livestock producer involved requested the state take action against the pack, because he would like to see the whole pack annihilated. His argument is that if a pack is killing livestock, you’ve got to kill every one of them that has been involved in that.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife stopped short of that request but did authorize the livestock producer to kill two wolves from the eight-member pack. ODFW officials also are authorized to kill the two wolves.

Under the terms of such a permit, the producer can kill up to two wolves on the private property he leases where the depredations occurred when his livestock is present on the property. This permit expires on May 4.

Pine Creek is a new pack of eight wolves — a breeding male and female, five yearlings and one other adult wolf. According to the ODFW the breeding female appears to be pregnant, and the permit does not stipulate which two wolves can be taken out.

Sean Stevens, executive director of the environmental group Oregon Wild, said that wolves should not be killed, especially not a pregnant female. Oregon is in the middle of a poaching epidemic and using a wolf management plan that expired three years ago.

Under state law, livestock producers are required to take non-lethal measures to deter wolf attacks. But if that doesn’t work, lethal action can be taken following “two depredations by wolves on livestock.”

ODFW officials said that the livestock producer had taken non-lethal measures to prevent attacks, including using range riders, hazing and delaying turning his cattle out, but it was apparently to no avail.

The two attacks took place on April 6 and 7 in the Fourmile Creek area of Baker County. ODFW officials inspected both incidents and confirmed both attacks came from wolves in the Pine Creek Pack.

Seven wolves of the Pine Creek Pack were observed in the same pasture as the calves, and the locations and size of the pre-mortem bite wounds are indicative of wolf attack. These, combined with the presence of wolves, were adequate to confirm this incident as a depredation of five calves by wolves of the Pine Creek Pack.

But that’s not enough; authorities plan to kill another two wolves in Northern Oregon after more livestock were attacked.

The Oregonian reports the wolves authorities are targeting are in the same pack as the two that were killed last week.

The pack of wolves in Wallowa County has become a problem for livestock in the area. State biologists estimated in December that the pack consists of about 10 wolves, and state officials previously said they’ve documented wolf attacks on seven cattle in the past 13 months, including three cattle kills.

Oregon removed wolves from the state’s Endangered Species list in 2015, but the animals remain on the federal list and are protected in Western Oregon. In north-east Oregon, however, the animals are managed under the state’s wolf plan.

Grey wolves only recently began returning to western Oregon, but there are increasing signs the small population of predators is no longer welcome.

Three collared wolves have been killed during the past year in south-west and south-central Oregon, prompting multiple investigations and a total of $40,000 in reward money for information on the unnatural deaths.

The most recent victim was OR-25, a 4-year-old male that was found dead Oct. 29 near Fort Klamath in Sun Pass State Forest. He joined OR-33 and OR-28, collared wolves that have also been killed in the Klamath Falls area since last October.

The deaths are significant because according to officials western Oregon is home to only about 15 to 20 wolves.

It’s a violation of the federal Endangered Species Act to kill a Grey wolf in the western two-thirds of Oregon, punishable by a $50,000 fine and a year in jail.

John Heil, spokesman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said that this is an unfortunate situation and they are concerned about it; they are going to work with their partners to try and find out what’s going on here.

OR-25, who originally dispersed from the Imnaha Pack in north-eastern Oregon, made headlines after roaming into California in 2016. One website even celebrated the arrival with the headline “Welcome OR-25: California’s Sexy New Lone Wolf!”

But OR-25 returned to Oregon and while likely searching for a mate roamed mostly in the area north and east of Klamath Falls. Details about how the wolf died were not released by the Fish and Wildlife service because of the “ongoing investigation.

Wolves first began arriving in Oregon, from Idaho in the late 1990s. But it wasn’t until 2011 that the animals reached the state’s west side. The first wolf to reach Oregon’s Cascade Range, OR-7, was celebrated as something of a folk hero, garnering international headlines as he roamed thousands of miles to find a mate.

OR-7 eventually put down roots in south-west Oregon and is now head of the Rogue Pack, which has an estimated 12 members, by far the largest pack in western Oregon.

But as more wolves headed west, the transition hasn’t always been as smooth.

Last summer, OR-33, who’d followed OR-7’s path west, roamed almost within Ashland city limits. From June 10th-12th, the young wolf attacked and killed two goats and one lamb at a small livestock operation north-east of the city.

Greg Roberts, a media personality in Southern Oregon at that time, said that this wolf was acting like David Lee Roth. He had eight people in Ashland say that they’ve seen him around their property. A year later, OR-33 was shot, his carcass found about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls in Fremont-Winema National Forest.

The story was somewhat different for OR-28, a 3-year-old female wolf who’d just had a pup with a mate near Silver Lake. While officials didn’t speculate about what was causing the incidents, it’s possible that an increased number of wolf attacks on livestock, including three blamed on OR-7’s Rogue Pack, could have eroded some public support. Conservation groups bemoaned the recent trend, saying the number of wolves killed by humans in Oregon represented a serious problem.

Last week, a hunter claimed self-defense after shooting a wolf in north-eastern Oregon. Considering the small number of wolves in Oregon, and even smaller number that have managed to disperse outside the north-east corner of the state, it should now be clear to state wildlife officials that illegal wolf killing represents an existential threat to recovering this native species, said Arran Robertson, spokesman for Oregon Wild.

Details on three wolf killings: 

OR-33 – Investigation open; a collared male was found dead April 23, 2017, about 20 miles northwest of Klamath Falls in Fremont-Winema National Forest. Cause of death was by gunshot. There is a $5,000 reward from Fish and Wildlife Service and an additional $10,000 dollars from nonprofit groups for information leading to the arrest or a criminal conviction of the person(s) responsible.

OR-28 – Investigation open; a collared female was found dead on Oct. 6, 2016, in the Fremont-Winema National Forest near Summer Lake, Oregon. Cause of death not released. There is a $5,000 reward from the USFWS and an additional $15,000 from conservation groups for information leading to the arrest or a criminal conviction of the person(s) responsible.

OR-25 – Investigation open; a collared male was found dead Oct. 29, 2017, near Fort Klamath in Sun Pass State Forest. Cause of death is not released. There is a $5,000 reward from the USFWS.

Original articles by Zach Urness, an outdoors writer, photographer and videographer in Oregon. He is the author of the book “Hiking Southern Oregon” and can be reached at zurness@StatesmanJournal.com or (503) 399-6801. Find him on Twitter at @ZachsORoutdoors.

Articles published here.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 149

Breaking Free

by Jennifer Tissot

At last here I was. The time had come for me to truly experience the great wild all the others had told me about.

I took in my surroundings, smelling the sweet fresh earth and watching every leaf as it quivered in the warm summer breeze.

Around my neck was the collar they, the humans, had placed around it before I’d left my comfort zone in the fenced in world that had been my home for so long.

But now I was grown. Strong and swift legged, alert and brimming with the deep forces of youth. My gray-white hairs on my back bristling with the excitement.

“Come,” Windbolt urged me. He stood beside me, green eyes eager for me to follow him.

I looked and caught the scent of the humans watching us from far off.

Then I turned with Windbolt, my brother, and we bounded forth into the deep embrace of the forests.

This was our world now and together we’d find our place in it. Living a new life of the wild. Raising a truly free family. This was the destiny of our kind. Of the wolves we were from ancient times. Born to break away free into all nature’s wonderful splendor designed just for us.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary
By Erin

Ascar II has discovered his love of howling. So far, howling was something initiated by the undisputed alpha female, Taima, typically when Ted and I left for our weekly shopping trip or to meet some friends once in a while. My friend Monika from half a kilometre down the road always mocked us about that, saying that the whole neighbourhood would know when we go out. Since that is not too often the case and never on the same day or time it does not really bother me, even though she often points out that the bad boys would also know exactly when nobody is at home and they might take a chance one day. On the other hand, I know how the pack behaves if somebody comes close to the gate and I have serious doubts that somebody would be brave enough to try out whether their impressive show of aggression is just show or if they mean real business.

However, a while ago, they also started howling in the middle of the day when Ted and I were at home and I had no idea what was cooking. It first turned out that it was the postman filling our little post box at the gate. A few days later they started again seemingly out of the blue, and this time it was the guy who comes to read the electricity meters. When I went to meet with Monika for our twice-weekly walk she asked me where we were the day before. I said we had been home but that the kids howled like mad because of the guy reading the meters. Meanwhile it’s the postman, the meter man, the rubbish collectors, people wearing red pieces of clothing passing, us going out, and heaven knows what else triggers their howling, and it’s no longer Taima acting as the choir master but Ascar II. I have watched him actually pushing the other two to join in no matter what. In earlier times I had thought so often how nice it would be if I could hear them howling more often, but now I wonder when the first neighbours may start complaining. Well, at least now people do not know any longer when we are out and when not, but honestly, I fear for the peace with our neighbours.

Will be continued…

Volume 13, Issue 161, March 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 161, March 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

We’ve got a bumper issue for you this month, but, I’m afraid to say, most of the information is not good for the wolves rightly co-inhabiting this world. Starting with the scandalous attempts in the US to undermine species conservation in general not only in their own murderous country, but also wherever ‘trophy animals’ persist in the world, through a demented serial killer who tries to find like-minded evolutionary challenged humans for a joint killing spree in a region of Canada where wolves had so far been left to live in peace, to deliberate misrepresentation of official wolf statistics in Germany, and on to disgusting underhanded political power games. If all of this weren’t enough to make a nature-conscious person puke, our attention was pointed to – and now read this twice – to canned wolf hunting in South Africa! I could fill pages with nasty comments, but because this would be pointless, I recommend you read through the News section yourself and form your own opinion… Do not miss the snippet on new pioneer legislation in some US states that will introduce a register for convicted animal abusers similar to that for sex offenders – for this is surely the best news in this issue!

A novelty is that we are now permitted to reprint selected information out of the monthly newsletter from the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary in Reitz, Free State, South Africa. They are doing excellent work there and deserve every little bit of support our readers can afford them and be it only by advertising their existence! If you wish to receive their newsletter in full (usually around the end of the month), you can add yourself to their mailing list by e-mailing Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com.

Other than that we have a write-up on the wolves in Canada’s Yukon region that a reader has made available. We also found a brief recollection of a real-life wolf encounter that we reprint here. And Erin adds yet another very interesting detail from her day-to-day life together with her pack.

There is also news regarding my own book, A Houseful Headful of Wolves (German edition: Das Haus Den Kopf voller Wölfe), in that there are now links on SAFOW’s Facebook page and on the SAFOW website for submitting book reviews: http://safow.org/book-review/ . Here you can post a short review in English or German without even having to register. We are looking forward to receiving your reviews because we really want to know your thoughts on this book.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:
Minneapolis Marriott Northwest
7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428
Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Early registration – $399.00* (– May 31, 2018)
  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more here.

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.

SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Spring Break Camp 
SPRING SESSION: APRIL 3 – 6
For children entering grades 3 – 5  ​
Time: 9AM – 3PM
Fee: $300 per child for the 4-day program (Tuesday – Friday)
Information & registration HERE!

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the center home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration.

Summer Internships for College Students

The Wolf Conservation Center is pleased to offer summer environmental education internship opportunities for college students! The environmental education internship is designed to expose interns to the field of conservation education and wildlife biology. Interns conduct a variety of education programs and assist with the daily operations of the WCC.

Information here.

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

SUMMER FAMILY ADVENTURE: August 5 – 10, 2018:details here.
FALL WILDLIFE ADVENTURE: September 8 – 13, 2018: details here.

News from the Wolf Front

National

From HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (newsletter February 2018; Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

  1. South Africa: Sad news from HuskyRomi

In February the sanctuary in Reitz, Free State, had to say their last farewells to two of their wolves. This time of the year ticks are a major problem, and although they have been spraying the whole sanctuary to protect the wolves from tickbites, heavy rains keep washing everything away, and so Izusu contracted and died of Biliary (a type of tickbite fever endemic to SA).

Another beautiful young wolf called Harley also lost the battle against Biliary.

Totem was luckier by surviving the strike of a Rinkhals Cobra after spending several days in the animal hospital with no control of his muscles and even struggling to breathe. Eventually he pulled through and is now recovering.

And as if that would not be enough the sanctuary’s 6-m³ freezer stopped running just when a huge heap of chickens arrived; they had to be thrown away in the end.

From The “Con” in Conservation (https://m.facebook.com/theconinconservation/photos/a.1527047997525668.1073741829.1525588341004967/1978544299042700/?type=3)

HUNTING WOLVES IN SOUTH AFRICA

You despicable slobs that call yourselves hunters in South Africa. You know and have known this for a long, long time. Yet you keep mum. Further proof that you never were and never will be conservationists. You #CarcassFondlers are nothing but frauds. Just all about the profit.

#TheConinConservation

Info via a Wolf Sanctuary in South Africa.

“Wolves were first introduced to South Africa by the army back in the late seventies, Wolter Basson wanted to try and breed a super dog, a lot of wolves are bred by zoos and sold to the public, we have a number of Canadian Reds which Pretoria zoo had, we have a Russian Tundra wolf bred at the Cradle of Life in Badplaas, two wolves that we got from someone were bred at the Emerald Casino zoo, we have numerous species of wolves form America to Mongolian wolves, the police breeding centre is still breeding wolfdogs/ hybrids and selling them, the list is endless.

The new thing that we are encountering are wolves that have been bred for the canned hunting trade, yes, R 25,000.00 and you can shoot a wolf in SA, I have been approached to sell one male and two or more females on three occasions by different breeders, the money is nice but I still have to sleep with myself at night, we received two wolves from Parys from a hunting lodge that a company bought, these two were the breeding pair, Orkney, Rustenberg, more places than you can even imagine. Bottom line is that they are exotics, there is no law prohibiting the breeding of them, no permits are required to own them or shoot them, I hope I have shed light on how they got here, they have been in SA as long as Huskies have.”

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. Mexico: LAWSUIT: Lobos face fatally-flawed “recovery plan”

It’s a cruel joke.

Just 114 Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild and now – after 40 years of waiting – a new “recovery plan” threatens to push them closer to extinction.

This plan has put the fight to save Mexican gray wolves, or lobos, into overdrive. And Defenders has filed an emergency lawsuit to stop it.

Support our legal and other life-saving work by helping us raise $150,000 by midnight tonight: Take action.

Lobos have always called the Southwest home – their presence helped shape the ecosystems of Arizona, New Mexico and Texas. But they are teetering on the edge of collapse and this “recovery plan” would tip the scales toward ruin.

This fatally-flawed plan is political pandering that disregards the opinions of leading wolf scientists in favour of arbitrary population caps set by the states – guaranteeing that no more than an average of 320 wolves will ever be allowed to exist in the Southwest.

In doing so, the plan ignores the best available science that indicates lobos require at least three connected populations totalling approximately 750 individuals to recover. In addition, it:

  • Cuts off access to vital recovery habitat in the southern Rockies and the Grand Canyon;
  • Fails to address the mounting threat of inbreeding by not calling for enough wolf reintroductions into the wild; and
  • Relies excessively on Mexico for wolf recovery despite its lack of adequate habitat.

This is no recovery plan – it is an attempt to play politics with the lobo’s future and pave a path for its destruction. Wolves deserve better.

Your urgent donation will provide the funds we need to defend wildlife whenever threats arise. Get us to our goal of $150,000 by midnight tonight: donate here.

Our team of conservation lawyers is fighting this disastrous plan in court and we are working every day to meet the ever-growing needs of all wildlife at risk of extinction. But we need the support of people like you to bolster our legal and wildlife-saving work.

We will never abandon wildlife in their fight for survival.

Can we count on your support? http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=8TSkc1KwVCdBTbIiJfMsIw

  1. USA: Congress returns to its cheap tricks

Anti-wildlife members of Congress are using a notorious, cheap political trick to wage war on wolves and the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

These lawmakers are shamelessly using the “must-pass” omnibus federal funding bill now being debated in the House and Senate as an opportunity to push through destructive amendments, or “riders.” If successful, these riders would topple gray wolf protections and undermine the ESA.

Act Now: Demand your representatives in Congress oppose all anti-wildlife riders in the funding bill: Take action.

Among the worst of these riders is a collection that together could devastate wolves. They include provisions to:

  • End protections for gray wolves in the Great Lakes region and block citizens from going to court to challenge a decision that delisted wolves in Wyoming;
  • Block all federal funding for gray wolf recovery in the lower 48 states – including the endangered Mexican gray wolf;
  • Allow aggressive, scientifically indefensible “predator control” measures to be used on wolves and bears on Alaska’s national preserves; and
  • End the red wolf recovery program and declare red wolves extinct.

But it’s not just wolves…Congress is attacking the ESA itself.

Perhaps the most heinous anti-ESA rider of all is one that would end protections for every single species for which the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has failed to complete a timely five-year status review. That’s more than 900 species – or roughly 54 percent – that would lose their protections under the ESA!

Speak out for wildlife now! Tell Congress there’s no room in the funding bill – or any legislation – for deadly attacks on wildlife and the ESA: Take action.

Politicizing wildlife protections undermines the very foundation of the ESA and jeopardizes the future of every animal it protects. Congress’ repeated attempts to weaken and dismantle this landmark law and undercut the pillars of science it is founded on is despicable.

The lifeline the ESA provides to species is more critical than ever. Congress should be focused on fully funding this last resort for wildlife, not destroying it.

Take action to defend wolves, wildlife and the ESA here.

 USA: URGENT: Wolves can’t wait

This is urgent.

Lawmakers are once again politicizing wildlife protections by using the must-pass federal funding bill to push through lethal anti-wildlife riders.

The future of wolves and more than 900 species listed under the Endangered Species Act is hanging in the balance.

Make an emergency donation today to help Defenders fight for their continued protection here.

  1. USA: Congress, coexistence and wolves in Colorado

Funding bill wages war on wolves, wildlife

Anti-wildlife members of Congress are using a notorious, cheap political trick to wage war on wolves and the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These members of Congress are shamelessly using the must-pass federal funding bill – or omnibus – as an opportunity to push through destructive amendments, or “riders.” If successful, these riders would undercut gray wolf protections and the ESA. Demand Congress oppose all anti-wildlife riders in the funding bill: Take action.

Restoring Wolves to Colorado

Wolves were once a part of Colorado’s landscape. However, their absence over the last 70 years is causing the natural balance of Colorado’s landscape to unravel. Defenders now has an opportunity to help bring them back and restore Colorado’s natural balance, for ourselves and future generations.
Learn more here.

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook.

1. Germany: We want to prevent the disappearance of Wolves from Saxony. Please donate!

Everybody talks about the allegedly rapid proliferation of wolves in Saxony. Even a so-called wolf expert from Bavaria says so, but is it really true? We had a look at the official statistics at http://www.dbb-wolf.de and also phoned them for further details. In 2015/16, 15 packs, 4 pairs, one territorial wolf and 52 cubs were counted in Saxony. In 2016/17 the numbers had decreased to 14 packs, 5 pairs, no territorial wolf at all, and just 39 cubs.

Territories also decreased from 20 to 19, which means in other words that wolves have not only not proliferated rapidly, but their numbers have decreased. The reason for that is, we think, not only due to more road deaths, but also to the fact that wolves, especially in Saxony, are illegally killed in Wild West fashion. Not every illegally killed wolf is discovered and considered for the statistics.

Since we, in contrast to big Wildlife Conservation organsations, do not receive support from the state we fully depend on donations.  Every single Euro helps to prevent further illegal wolf killings. Please help us to protect the wolves in Saxony by donating to:

Wolfsschutz-Deutschland
Berliner Sparkasse
IBAN DE79 1005 0000 0190 7118 84
BIC BELADEBEXXX

Donations via PayPal: http://wolfsschutz-deutschland.de/spenden-2/

From Change.org (Salty Dog via Change.org [change@mail.change.org])

  • Canada: A One-Man Bounty On Wolves In British Columbia
  • Wolves in British Columbia are in grave danger at the time of this writing. Steve Isdahl has proudly taken it upon himself on social media to have as many wolves killed in the province as he can. Contacting trappers on Facebook he is appealing to trappers and hunters in the seven regions to join him in his mission. He is raising funds for snares, leg hold traps, gas for trucks and ATV access to remote management units.
    It’s all there to see on his Facebook page, euphemistically named “BC Ungulate Foundation” (https://www.facebook.com/Growungulates/) which he is wanting to register as a charity. He claims that wolves have decimated deer, elk and moose populations in the province, and therefore must be killed exponentially in all regions. He provides no research on wolf populations nor research on specific ungulate populations, only the assertion of some hunters that they have been unable to kill as many ungulates as they did several years ago.
  • Petition update: Stop Under Armour from killing wild Animals – Please Sign: https://www.change.org/p/stop-under-armour-from-killing-wild-animals-please-sign

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail102.atl71.mcdlv.net); on behalf of Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Hunting wolves for trophy? What you can do for wolves right now.

URGENT — Facing another appropriations deadline on March 23, Congress is still working to determine how to fund the government. Unfortunately, damaging anti-wolf riders that undermine Endangered Species Act protections for wolves are still in play.
One provision seeks to permanently remove federal ESA protections for Grey wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Wyoming, to allow trophy hunting to resume. To add insult to injury, the bill prohibits its judicial review thus preventing any legal challenge.
If these riders are not removed by Congress, wolves will die at the hands of trophy hunters. 
Please take action today.

  1. USA: Wolf Conservation Center Slammed by Storm (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=d67bd52a05&e=c4f881378d)

Wolf Conservation Center staff, volunteers, and wolves are sharing a collective sigh of relief today.
Wednesday’s big, blustery nor’easter, the second to hit New York’s Westchester County in less than a week, brought well over a foot of wet, heavy snow and significant fence damage to the WCC. Thankfully, the wolves are okay.
WCC’s endangered species facility, which houses the majority of the Center’s critically endangered Mexican gray wolves and red wolves, bared the brunt of the formidable storm. Although a number of enclosures were damaged, the wolves remained safe and contained.
WCC staff has been working tirelessly to remove debris, address the compromised fence-lines and make the pathways and roads accessible. However, many repairs remain to be done. If you are able, please consider making a donation to help us in this effort. Every penny helps!
Some good news — since our restricted area was impacted the most, all education programming remains on schedule!

  1. You heard our howls – Thank you!

We asked for your help and you heard our howls! Thanks to you, we are making good progress recovering from damage brought on by last week’s powerful nor’easter!

We are humbled by the incredible support from our pack – supporters like you.
Howls of thanks from all us here at the Wolf Conservation Center!

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

  1. Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – January 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf telemetry flight location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH or www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On January 11, 2018, the USFWS met with the Catron County Commission to discuss the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, the 2016 Office of Inspector General report, and communication.

On January 23, 2018, the USFWS met with the Chairman of the New Mexico State Game Commission, the Director of the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) and NMDGF staff to discuss permits for cross-fostering, the status of Mexican wolf recovery in Mexico, and communication.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) indicate wolves younger than 24 months or pups. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018. The year-end population count for 2017 will be available in February.  In 2016, the year-end minimum count was 113 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.  At the end of the helicopter count and capture operation, there were 79 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, AF1335, m1673, m1676, and fp1683)

In January, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF), occasionally documented on the SCAR.  Yearling m1673 continued to make dispersal movements into New Mexico and is now considered a single animal.  Yearling m1676 and female pup 1683 were captured, collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Bluestem Pack (collared F1489)

In January, F1489 continued making dispersal movements around the northern and western edges of the Bluestem Pack’s traditional territory in the central ASNF and is now considered a single animal.  There are currently no functional collars in the pack, but the IFT continues to monitor the pack with trail cameras.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, m1471, fp1668, and mp1671)

In January, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  In 2016, three yearling wolves from the Elk Horn Pack, m1471, f1473, and m1477, each dispersed from their natal territory.  Yearling m1471 has been travelling with Prime Canyon F1488.  AF1294 was captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Frieborn Pack (collared F1443 and m1447)

In January, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in Arizona and into New Mexico.  Female 1443 was captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, f1550, mp1666, mp1677, and mp1681)

In January, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  Male pups 1677 and 1681 were captured, collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.  Female 1550 was documented travelling with single m1571 during the helicopter count and capture operation.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In January, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AF1339, AM1382, and m1574)

In January, the Panther Creek Pack was located in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  AF1339 was captured, re-collared, and temporarily moved to captivity.

Pine Spring Pack (collared f1562 and AM1394)

In January, f1562 was localized in the north central portion of the ASNF and was documented travelling with AM1394 (previously fate unknown).  AM1394 was captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared F1488 and m1471)

In January, F1488 was documented travelling within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  Yearling m1471 from the Elk Horn Pack has been documented travelling with Prime Canyon F1488 throughout January.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, mp1661, and mp1680)

In January, the Saffel Pack was located in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  Male pup 1680 and AM1441 were captured, collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Single collared AM1038

In January, AM1038 of the old Hawks Nest Pack was documented travelling within the GNF in New Mexico.

Single collared f1473

In January, f1473 was documented travelling alone and continued to make dispersal movements between Arizona and New Mexico.

Single collared m1477

In January, m1477 was documented travelling with an uncollared wolf in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1484

In January, f1484 was documented travelling alone to the east and north of the Panther Creek Pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared m1571

In January, m1571 was documented making wide dispersal movements in New Mexico and the north central portion of the ASNF.  Male 1571 was documented travelling with Hoodoo f1550 during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Single collared m1572

In January, m1572 was documented making wide dispersal movements in the Coconino National Forest, and through the western and central portions of the ASNF to the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and mp1672)

In January, mp1672 was documented travelling occasionally with f1560 in the eastern portion of the FAIR.  Male pup 1672 was also located in the north-eastern portion of ASNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, AM1347 (previously fate unknown) was documented travelling with f1560 and mp1672.  AM1347 was captured, re-collared, and released.

Diamond Pack

As of January, the wolves in the Diamond Pack have all been travelling separately for more than three months and are now considered single animals.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and fp1674)

In January, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.  AF1283 and AM1343 were captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Single m1559

In January, m1559 made large dispersal movements in the eastern portion of the FAIR and was documented travelling with an uncollared wolf (now known as f1679).

Single f1560

In January, f1560 was documented travelling with the Baldy Pack in the eastern portion of the FAIR and north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared f1679

In January, f1679 was first documented as an uncollared wolf travelling with m1559 in the eastern portion of the FAIR.  Female 1679 was captured, collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (collared M1386)

During January, M1386 was documented travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF), in traditional Copper Creek Pack territory.  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, the IFT documented F1444 travelling with M1386.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared F1456 and M1354)

During January, F1456 and M1354 were documented travelling together within the west central portion of the GNF.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During January, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  Sub-adult m1556 continued to show dispersal behaviour in January, and was located in the east portion of the Gila Wilderness.  The IFT captured, re-collared and released AF1278 during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During January, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  AF1405 was captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293, AF1346, and m1561)

During January, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.  During January, m1561 made dispersal movements around the GNF.  Male 1561 was captured, re-collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During January, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  Female pup 1684 was captured, collared, and released during the annual helicopter count and capture operation.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and fp1664)

During January, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.  Female pup 1664 was captured by a private trapper in the north-western portion of the GNF.  The IFT processed, collared, provided veterinary treatment for a foot injury, and released the wolf.  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, fp1664 was re-captured to provide additional veterinary treatment for the foot injury and is being temporarily held in captivity.  AM1296 was captured, re-collared, and released.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, f1565, mp1669, and mp1678)

During January, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, mp1678 was captured, collared, and released.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and fp1578)

During January, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)

During January, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, AF1553 and fp1682 were captured, collared, and released.

Single collared AM1155

During January, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was documented travelling within the GNF in New Mexico.

Single collared M1453

In January, M1453 was documented travelling with two uncollared wolves (one now known as f1685) in the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Single collared m1486

During January, m1486 travelled throughout northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1552

During January, M1552 was not located by the IFT.

Single collared m1569

During January, m1569 travelled throughout the central and northern portion of the CNF.

Single collared f1685

During the annual helicopter count and capture operation, f1685 was captured, collared, and released.  Female 1685 was documented travelling with M1453 and an uncollared wolf in the western portion of the CNF.

MORTALITIES

There were no documented mortalities in the month of January.

INCIDENTS

During the month of January, there were seven confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock and one confirmed wolf depredation on a domestic dog.  There were 3 nuisance incidents investigated.  From January 1 to January 31, 2018 there have been a total of five confirmed depredation incidents in New Mexico and three confirmed depredation incidents in Arizona.

On January 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 8, Wildlife Services investigated a domestic dog killed at a residence in Greenlee County, AZ.  The investigation determined the dog was a confirmed wolf kill.  The IFT responded to the location and initiated trapping efforts in attempt to capture and identify the wolves involved with the depredation.  No wolves were captured.  The IFT confirmed there were no wolves with functional radio collars and no known wolf packs in the area at the time of the incident.  No residents were present when the incident occurred.  The IFT initiated monitoring efforts in the area that remain ongoing at the time of this writing.  The IFT has advised residents in the area of their legal rights under provisions in the Federal Final 2015 10(j) rule to protect domestic dogs and livestock from wolves.  Private land owners or their designee can shoot wolves that are in the act of biting, killing, or wounding domestic animals (livestock or non-feral dogs) on non-federal land (private, tribal, or state land).  Any form of take must be reported within 24 hours to the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service by telephone 505-346-2525; or fax 505-346-2542.

On January 10, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 14, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 15, Wildlife Services investigated three dead cows in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cause of death for all three cows was unknown.

On January 22, the IFT received a report of a two wolves observed near an occupied residence in Catron County, NM.  The IFT confirmed the animals were wolves by a photograph taken.  By the time the IFT received report of the incident, the wolves had left the area.

On January 24, the IFT received a report of wolves observed feeding on a deer behind a residence in Greenlee County, AZ.  The IFT responded, conducted a site investigation and determined the sighting was probable wolf.  The IFT initiated ongoing monitoring efforts in the area.  At the time of writing, there have been no additional confirmed wolf sightings in the area.

On January 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 31, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On January 9, WMAT personnel presented during a radio show on KNNB in Whiteriver, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In January, two tribal youth started an internship with WMAT.

  1. Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – Feb 1-28, 2018

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On February 2, 2018, the Fish and Wildlife Service Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator briefed staff from Senator Udall and Senator Heinrich’s staff on the status of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program.

On February 21, 2018, the USFWS, AZGFD, and Mexico’s National Commission of Natural Protected Areas (CONANP by its Spanish acronym) held a conference call to discuss collaboration in implementation of recovery actions in the two countries.

Reproduction Specialists with the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan collected semen from Mexican wolves at Ladder Ranch Wolf Management Facility on February 8, 2018, for the “frozen zoo,” which will be used in future research and artificial insemination.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started November 1, 2017 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 24, 2018 through February 3, 2018. The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. In 2016, the year-end minimum count was 113 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups. At the end of February, there were 76 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, AF1335, m1676, and fp1683)

In February, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF), occasionally documented on the SCAR.

Bluestem Pack

In February, the IFT documented the pack in the Bluestem Pack’s traditional territory in the central portion of the ASNF. There are currently no functional collars in the pack, but the IFT continued to monitor the pack with trail cameras.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, fp1668, and mp1671)

In February, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the northeastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Frieborn Pack (collared F1443 and m1447)

In February, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in Arizona and New Mexico.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, f1550, mp1666, mp1677, and mp1681)

In February, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. Sub-adult f1550 was documented travelling apart from the Hoodoo Pack with single m1571 during the month of February.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In February, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AF1339, AM1382, and m1574)

In February, the Panther Creek Pack was located in their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Alpha Female 1339 was returned to the wild from captivity and released back in the Panther Creek Pack’s territory. The members of the pack have been travelling separately.

Pine Spring Pack (collared f1562 and AM1394)

In February, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache on the ASNF for this pair to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared F1488 and M1471)

In February, F1488 was documented travelling within a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. M1471 from the Elk Horn Pack has been documented travelling with Prime Canyon F1488 since December and is now considered a part of the Prime Canyon Pack.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, mp1661, and mp1680)

In February, the Saffel Pack was located in their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared m1477

In February, m1477 was documented in the east central portion of the ASNF and occasionally on the SCAR.

Single collared f1484

In February, f1484 was documented travelling alone to the east of the Panther Creek Pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT confirmed the mortality of f1484 in February. The incident is under investigation.

Single collared F1489

In February, F1489 has been travelling on the east side of Bluestem’s traditional territory in the east Central portion of the ASNF.

Single Collared m1571

In February, m1571 was documented making dispersal movements in the north central portion of the ASNF. Male 1571 has been documented travelling with Hoodoo f1550 during the month of February.

Single collared m1572

In February, m1572 was documented making wide dispersal movements in the Coconino National Forest and through the western portion of the ASNF. In February, the IFT confirmed the mortality of m1572. The incident is under investigation.

Single collared m1673

In February, m1673 made dispersal movements back into Arizona and has been documented travelling in the area north of Bear Wallow Pack’s territory.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and mp1672)

In February, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and fp1674)

In February, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory on the FAIR.

Single Collared wolf m1559

In February, m1559 was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR with f1679.

Single Collared wolf f1560

In February, f1560 was documented travelling with the Baldy Pack in the eastern portion of the FAIR and north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single Collared f1679

In February, f1679 was documented travelling with m1559 in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack (collared AM1386)

During February, the Copper Creek Pack was documented travelling in the western portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF), within the packs traditional territory.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During February, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the GNF.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During February, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. Sub-adult m1556 continued to show dispersal behaviour. Male 1555 was also documented making dispersal movements in February.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During February, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293, AF1346, and m1561)

During February, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness. Male 1561 continued to make dispersal movements within the GNF.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During February, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT maintained a food cache for the Luna pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, and fp1664)

During February, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. Female pup 1664 was released within the Mangas Pack territory after temporary medical treatment for a foot injury.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, f1565, mp1669, and mp1678)

During February, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and fp1578)

During February, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284, AF1553, mp1667, and fp1682)

During February, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared AM1155

During February, AM1155 of the old Morgart’s Pack was documented travelling within the GNF in New Mexico.

Single Collared M1453

In February, M1453 was documented travelling within the ASNF at the beginning of the month, then returned to the western portion of Cibola National Forest (CNF). M1453 has been documented travelling with f1685.

Single collared m1486

During February, m1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared m1569

During February, m1569 travelled throughout the central and northern portion of the CNF and in portions of the GNF.

Single Collared f1685

During February, f1685 was documented travelling with M1453 in the western portion of the CNF.

Single collared AM1038

During February, AM1038 of the old Hawks Nest Pack was documented travelling in north central portions of the GNF and was located at least once travelling with f1473.

Single collared f1473

During February, f1473 was documented travelling in north central portions of the GNF and was located at least once travelling with AM1038.

MORTALITIES

In February, f1484 was located dead in Arizona, the incident is under investigation.

In February, m1572 was located dead in Arizona, the incident is under investigation.

From January 1 to February 28, 2018 there have been a total of two documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of February, there were nine confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were five nuisance incidents investigated in February, three of which were confirmed as wolf by the IFT. From January 1 to February 28, 2018 there have been a total of 14 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and three confirmed depredation incidents in Arizona.

On February 1, the IFT received a report of three wolves near an occupied residence in Apache County, AZ. The IFT confirmed the presence of wolves, but they had left the area by the time the report came in.

On February 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a probable wolf kill.

On February 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a probable wolf kill.

On February 6, the IFT received a report of a wolf from a highway in Catron County, NM. The IFT confirmed a wolf was in the area and attempted to haze the animal away, but the animal had already left the area.

On February 8, WMAT investigated a dead heifer on the FAIR. The investigation determined the heifer died of unknown causes.

On February 8, WMAT investigated a dead cow on the FAIR. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown causes.

On February 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf had been killed by coyotes.

On February 23, the IFT received a report of a wolf feeding on an elk carcass in the vicinity of occupied residences. The IFT responded immediately, confirmed the presence of a wolf in the area and attempted to haze, but the animal had already left the area.

On February 24, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On February 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On February 6, WMAT met with Tribal and non-Tribal stakeholders and a consultant regarding predator/livestock coexistence/conflict mitigation.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

There are no project personnel updates for the month of February.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at(505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

Next Door

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International

From ForceChange (TakeAction@ForceChange.com)

USA: Trump Tricked Us – Oppose His Quiet Plan to Allow Trophy Hunting

Trump has re-approved his plan to allow imports of dead exotic animals killed by trophy hunters. Previously, Trump had reversed this decision after public uproar, including by our community. However, once that uproar died down, Trump returned to his original decision to encourage trophy hunting. Sign this petition to denounce Trump’s support of trophy hunting: Sign petition.

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From Selflovers (website)

USA: Thanks to new law, animal abusers will now be registered like sex offenders

Now that animal abuse is being taken way more seriously than ever before, more and more jurisdictions are altering their laws to reflect this new reality. A number of United States jurisdictions have made laws that require the names of animal abusers to be displayed in a registry that is similar to the ones that are used for sex offenders.

These registries are designed with the objective of keeping people who have harmed animals in the past from ever having the chance to do so again and they are a welcome addition to the lawmaking policies of places as disparate as New York City and Tampa, FL.

Retail outlets and shelters no longer have an excuse when it comes to providing animals to those who have a history of abuse, as they are required to have a prospective adopter read and sign an affidavit that provides assurance that they are not on the registry.

If you are a regular person who is in search of a pet sitter while you are away on vacation, these registries also take on added value, allowing you to vet candidates more readily and do the proper research before potentially leaving your animals in harm’s way.

The registries are not yet a requirement in all states, but they are slowly popping up throughout the country, in places like New York City (although theirs is not able to be viewed by the general public), Tennessee (whose is statewide) and Cook County, Illinois.

For those who consider pets to be family members, this is welcome news. Perhaps individuals who consider hurting animals in the future will reconsider their actions if they are aware of the fact that their name will end up on a list that is easily searchable. Having actual documentation to use makes life simpler for animal lovers, as well as law enforcement.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in the Yukon

To spot a wolf in Canada’s Yukon is a rare occasion, but they’re indeed out there – an estimated population of 5,000 wolves calls the Yukon their home, which comes to about one wolf every 96 square km. Their geographic range spreads from the boreal forest to the alpine and Arctic tundra with only the vast Kluane Icefield being unoccupied. While wolves in many parts of North America had been exterminated and then reintroduced in some parts they are still thriving in the Yukon.

The wolves in the Yukon are not unique in any sense but just normal Grey wolves like all the others living in other wild areas. The difference here is the ecosystem they move through so invisibly is still intact because of a natural predator-prey system, meaning that the wolf and ungulate populations (mostly moose and caribou and, to a lesser extent, mountain sheep) are largely in balance. Of course have humans not always been content to leave that balance alone, but wolves existed in the Yukon as many as 47,000 years ago.

The wolf-human conflict did not become a major issue in the territory until the 20th century, after the Klondike Gold Rush brought thousands of newcomers to the area. It was then that trappers in a booming and busting fur industry began to complain that wolves were harming their business, blaming the wolves for decrease of numbers of ungulates. In the 1920s it was allowed to use strychnine baits for wolves, and a system of wolf bounties was set up. Eventually, the government took control of the strychnine programs.

In his book Wolves of the Yukon author Bob Hayes describes his arrival by helicopter on the scene of a strychnine bait site in 1985 where he found a sow grizzly bear crumpled in the trees, two wolves, 10 ravens and six magpies besides of hundreds of dead chickadees on the ground and in the willow branches.

In 1972 the use of Strychnine use was restricted but its use continued illegally in some quarters for several years with nobody ever charged. Bob Hayes, a biology grad, was offered the position of wolf biologist for the Yukon government in 1982. The carnivores were a hot topic at the time, with Whitehorse residents concerned about incursions into their yards and subdivisions, and hunters in the Southern Lakes region of the territory upset about low moose numbers.

Bob Hayes took the job and kept it for 18 years. After one decade on the job the government launched a new wolf management plan in 1992, which included some progressive and pro-wolf elements such as the assertion that wolves had an inherent value in and of themselves — beyond their influence, positive or negative, on human concerns such as game availability or the safety of neighbourhood pets. But it also made provision for legalized aerial wolf control as a means to protect ungulate populations for human hunting.

After the 1992 plan was adopted, a large-scale aerial wolf-kill program was launched in the Aishihik region, near Kluane National Park and Reserve and the town of Haines Junction. Dozens of wolves were shot from helicopters, and because Hayes was the as the government’s leading wolf biologist and therefore responsible for overseeing the program, was suddenly viewed by activists as Wolf Enemy No. 1.

The furor over the wolves in the Yukon has almost died down since the 1990s and after Bob Hayes had left his post in 2000 he became a potent voice against aerial wolf killings and other lethal wolf-management methods. The Yukon government released a new wolf management plan in 2012 that put an end to government-run wolf killing programs. Mark O’Donoghue, a territorial biologist, was one of the authors of the new plan. This time the public was asked for their opinion and surprisingly they declared that they did not want to see any more of these big helicopter wolf-control programs. This change in public sentiment was based on ethical considerations as well as on concerns over the programs’ high costs and low efficacy. For now this plan is working and the wolf population is healthy the impact of climate change could turn into another benefit for the wolves – some of the territory’s tundra is gradually becoming taiga, a moose habitat and an increasing moose density.

Original source: Canadian Geographic 2017, “They’re out there” by Eva Holland, kindly made available by our supporter, Andreas Schillert.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 148

Face to Face
by Ally Cleetz
based on a true story

The highway seemed to stretch without an end as I drove along for home. It was on that bright, summer morning as I was driving with the deep woods on either side of me that I saw it up ahead.

I pulled over to the curb, thinking the long-legged animal was a deer. But to my surprise, I saw a lean, gray wolf, standing in the underbrush on the edge of the woods. Stepping out of my car, I stood thirty feet from the wolf.

It was my first sighting of a wolf in my whole life and I was thrilled. My heart beat quicker as the wolf and I stared for what seemed a moment frozen in time.

The wolf wasn’t sleek but mangy and thin, as if it’d had a rough life over the past winter months.

I wondered just what it was like to be a lone wolf in an area I didn’t think had wolves. Was it lonely? Did it long for a mate of its own?

Then, time moved forward and the wolf turned and dashed into the darkness of its wooded home.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary
By Erin

I cannot believe how time is flying – hasn’t it just been New Year a few days back? – and suddenly it’s again the middle of March. The furry kids are all but through with shedding hair, which is great because I already feared my vacuum cleaner would not survive this season. We had loads of work over the year’s end season and maybe that’s why time seemed to be flying.

One thing that came up over the last few months was this: For donkey years we have been employing the same feeding routine and it always worked fine, until Ascar II suddenly decided that all three having a food bowl with an equal portion in it was not in line with his understanding of pack rules. Every day at feeding time, he now started to first inspect his food bowl, then move over to Kajack’s, pushing him aside and making it clear that Kajack II was not allowed to eat before he, Ascar, had taken out the best bits. That caused great irritation with Taima, the undisputed boss, who started to snarl at him and show him her K9s, but then was so unsettled that she would abandon her bowl and retreat into the house. That’s what I call true disharmony at the dinner table.

My first try to solve this problem was to take Ascar’s bowl away as soon as his nose was buried in Kajack’s and give it to Kajack. I also placed Taima’s bowl farther away from the two others to give her more space and peace. That worked for about two days, and then Ascar started to move between the two remaining bowls, pushing Kajack away from the bowl he was just busy with and wandering off to inspect Taima’s. Next try was to place Taima’s bowl inside the house so that at least one of them could eat without interruptions and hold Kajack’s bowl on my lap while Ascar’s was placed in front of him. That also worked for another two or three days, and then the game started over, because now Ascar only wanted to eat from the bowl on my lap. O.k., boys; my lap is not big enough for two bowls, but my arms are long enough to hold both with outstretched arms, one to the right, one to the left. You should give that a try – it’s better than a workout at the Gym!

It worked for about a week, but then Ascar decided that this was still not good enough for him and I started to feel like that guy on the airfield directing the aeroplanes from and to their parking spots, and slowly but surely I was running out of ideas. Then Ted came to the rescue – Taima eating inside the house, Ted holding Ascar’s bowl for him, and I, at some distance, held Kajack’s. O.k., that seemed to be fine – for a while … After that we decided to feed Taima in the passage where she was feeling comfortable, Kajack in the kitchen, and Ascar outside, with the doors between them closed. Ted was in the house with Kajack and Taima and I was outside with Ascar. Oh boy, what a chaos! The only one eating was Taima; Ascar had nothing else on his mind but finding a way inside to get to Kajack’s food and Kajack refused to eat being separated from his idol (regardless of all the mobbing he has to endure from Ascar he worships the ground he is walking on), wanting to get out to him. When I already thought that this nightmare would never end I remembered the way they do it in the wild. If there are no cubs, the alphas will eat first, take the best morsels and only when they allow the rest of the pack to join in they can also have their rations. O.k., maybe I had to try a completely different approach.

Since just throwing the food out on the lawn would never work because the only one getting some would be Ascar, I took a big bowl and put all the food in it. They typically get chicken feet, heads and necks, sometimes chicken parts, and when I can get my hands on game offcuts from our butcher they will get chunks of that. Then I took that bowl, went outside, sat on the step of the rear veranda and called them. I let Ascar, the alpha male, choose the first piece and while he was busy with it I started to throw each of the other two their pieces while they were standing at a short distance away from me. When Ascar had finished his piece he came for the next and I threw more food to the other two. This way they all got equal portions, and Ascar seemed to be perfectly o.k. with that method, his own concern apparently having been to claim ‘first choice’ for himself all the time.

Kajack has always been very good at catching in the air whatever you throw at him; Taima needed some time to learn it by watching him, but meanwhile she is almost as good as Kajack, and as long as they keep their distance to Ascar and he can choose his pieces from the bowl, he is happy with it. This method has now been working for many months without any problems and I’m happy to say that harmony at the dinner table could be re-established.

Will be continued…