Volume 10, Issue 129, July 2015

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 10, Issue 129, July 2015

From the Editor’s Desk

Oh am I furious! What do you get when you shoot an animal of a species that is evidently on the very brink of extinction in a civilized country? A court case and a hefty sentence, right? What do you get when you do exactly this in the US? Support by the federal agency that is supposed to protect wildlife. What a farce! What’s even more worrying though (if at all possible) is that an increasing number of pliable congressmen are presently striving to dump the very idea of wildlife conservation. I have said it before and I’ll say it again: The extent of reverse evolution in the US is one of the most serious threats to this planet. Read for yourself about the death of one of the last ten Red Wolf females and abominable Washington politics in the News section below.

Once you have digested that, go on and read about the sell-out of elephants in Zimboland. You won’t have much difficulty spotting the similarities even if the styles differ.

A reader pointed out to us a link to a YouTube video that is really worthwhile watching and we thank him very much.

Then we have a thrilling wolf tale, and Erin reports the latest on her pack.

Till next month,
Ed.

News from the Wolf Front

National

Nothing to report

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: North Carolina: Red wolf mom gunned down

Yet another heartbreaking blow to the recovery of critically endangered red wolves.

We just learned that last week, a private landowner shot and killed a six-year old female wolf – one of only 10 breeding females left in the wild. It is likely that the wolf had puppies at the time of her death.

The fate of those pups is unknown, but our wolf experts are not optimistic they’ll be able to survive without her.

Perhaps most outrageous of all, the wolf was shot with the express permission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS).

Take Action: tell FWS to stop killing critically endangered red wolves:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=YpnILJ-fPgv-8dbEPidPQA

Defenders will take whatever action is necessary to stop future tragedies like this one, and secure red wolves’ future in the wild.

In bureaucrat speak; these kinds of killings are called “lethal control.” It’s a measure that’s only supposed to happen under extreme circumstances, and only after non-harmful efforts are exhausted. There is no indication that any extreme circumstances existed or that any non-lethal efforts were attempted to remove the wolf from the shooter’s property.

For decades, FWS has stumbled in its legally-mandated efforts to foster the recovery of these beautiful and secretive animals. Red wolves once roamed from Pennsylvania to Florida. Today, fewer than 100 animals survive in the wild in a small part of eastern North Carolina.

News of this unconscionable shooting comes as the state of North Carolina is turning up the pressure to put an end to red wolf recovery efforts altogether. FWS’s actions represent a grave step in the wrong direction.

Please join me today and tell FWS to end all lethal control of red wolves in North Carolina:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=N3mJmeSUb6AV1-9N_vyiGQ

Thank you so much for all you do.

2: USA: New bill is death sentence for Mexican Grey wolves

If you’re like me, when something you love is attacked you get angry.

As a lifelong wildlife lover I’m plenty angry. But more than that I’m determined.

Please donate today to help us fight back and your gift will be matched dollar-for-dollar, up to a total of $75,000:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=C1Eq9vCO4r3CWlVMEt7NVA

…In Washington, D.C., the very idea of wildlife conservation is under fierce attack…

…In states like Idaho, anti-wolf killers are cleaning their guns and zeroing in on their kill…

…In North Carolina, an endangered red wolf mom was gunned down, her pups left to die alone…

…And even though an African elephant falls to a poacher’s bullet every 15 minutes, the National Rifle Association is using its powerful muscle to block efforts to stop illegal ivory trafficking.

Enough is enough. We’re fighting back with all we’ve got. But we need your help, and thanks to our Board of Directors and members of our National Council, your donation will go twice as far for wolves and other wildlife you love.

Your donation will be matched, dollar-for-dollar, up to a total of $75,000 between now and June 30th:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=lcZu_YBW9WYcHqijvdBI3g

Since 1947, Defenders of Wildlife has been the premiere voice for wolves and other imperilled wildlife from coast to coast. Thanks to people like you, we’ve stood up for wolves, bears, panthers, manatees and a whole host of wildlife and wild places.

Your urgent support will be especially helpful right now as we fight back appalling attacks such as these:

  • The House Interior Appropriations Bill would weaken the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and politically delist wolves in Wyoming and the Great Lakes.
  • More than 50 standalone bills, amendments and riders have been proposed this Congress to undermine the ESA.
  • Several bills are pending that would leave nearly all wolves in the Lower 48 to the not-so-tender mercy of the states.
  • Special interest pressure has the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on the verge of abandoning recovery efforts for the Mexican gray wolf and the red wolf.

This isn’t what most Americans want. That’s why we’re optimistic that if we fight hard enough and long enough, we can turn back these heinous efforts to abandon America’s wildlife.

And remember, every dollar you donate today will go twice as far to protect the wildlife you love with our emergency match in effect.

America’s wildlife is counting on you. Won’t you help?
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=ZvqxCdgartqw7anaYocZiQ

Thanks so much for standing with me and millions of other wildlife lovers.

  1. USA: URGENT ACTION: Stop the Mexican Grey wolf extinction bill!

The anti-wildlife frenzy in Congress has taken another dark turn. And this one is truly despicable.

Last week, Congressmen Pearce and Gosar introduced HR 2910, a bill that would remove Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection and terminate all federal recovery efforts for the Mexican gray wolf in Arizona and New Mexico. Despite widespread public support for wolf recovery in both states, this bill would all but guarantee the extinction of these beautiful animals.

Tell your Representative to oppose any efforts to end ESA protection and abandon Mexican gray wolf recovery:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=uaC2sZb1jvqftwimMU9oUQ

HR 2910 is the latest in a long line of bills intended to cripple the Endangered Species Act by replacing sound science with special interest driven politics. In fact, more than 50 bills introduced this year have been aimed at eroding the very foundation of wildlife conservation in this country.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s foot-dragging and the endless sabotaging by anti-wolf politicians in Arizona and New Mexico have crippled Mexican gray wolf recovery.

This has gone on for almost 20 years – now these wolves are running out of time and heading toward extinction.

Today, only 109 of these top predators cling to survival in the American Southwest.

Take Action: Tell your Representative to oppose HR 2910, and demand full recovery efforts for the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf:
http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=pjeP8h-IusY5pAro1mb9mQ

Thank you so much for your commitment and your compassion.

From California Wolfcenter
(californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Endangered Species Updates May 1 – 31, 2015

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), and New Mexico.   Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf. Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.gov/signup. This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Reintroduction Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view weekly wolf telemetry flight location information or the 3-month wolf distribution map, please visit www.azgfd.gov/wolf. On the home page, go to the “Wolf Location Information” heading on the right side of the page near the top and scroll to the specific location information you seek.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Numbering System: Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) indicate wolves younger than 24 months or pups. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

At the end of May 2015 the wild Mexican wolf population consisted of 52 wolves with functional radio collars dispersed among 19 packs and three single wolves. Members of the IFT have started pup counts this month and have so far counted 22 pups produced by five packs in the MWEPA.

IN ARIZONA:

Bluestem Pack (collared AF1042, m1331, f1333, m1382, m1404, and f1405)

In May, the Bluestem Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the central portion of the ASNF. Wolf m1331 has been located separate from the Bluestem Pack during the month. The IFT has documented denning behaviour from AF1042 during May. F1333 and m1382 have remained with AF1042. The IFT counted a total of eight pups produced by the Bluestem Pack this month. It is the largest litter documented in the wild since the project began. Two wolves, m1404 and f1405 were captured and collared by the IFT this month. Wolf m1404 was fitted with a GPS collar for the summer predation study.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294 and M1342)

In May, the IFT continued to document denning behaviour by the Elk Horn Pack within their traditional territory in the northeast portion of the ASNF.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038, AF1280 and m1383)

In May, the Hawks Nest Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT trapped and re-collared m1383 this month. Wolf m1383 was fitted with a GPS collar and released on site. The IFT counted five pups produced by the Hawks Nest Pack this month.

Hoodoo Pack (collared M1290)

In May, M1290 was in the area north-central portion of the ASNF. The IFT is continuing to monitor M1290 to determine if f1395 is still travelling with him.

Marble Pack (F1340)

The IFT continues to document a male wolf with a non-function radio collar traveling with F1340 in the northwest-central portion of the ASNF. F1340 has been documented showing denning behaviour during this month.

Maverick Pack (collared AM1183, AF1291, and f1335)

During May, the Maverick Pack travelled within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and ASNF. Wolf F1335 has been located separate from the Maverick Pack in May and has continued to travel with M1338 in the southern portion of the ASNF. The IFT has not documented denning behaviour from the Maverick Pack this year.

Panther Creek Pack (F1339 and M1394)

The IFT has documented denning behaviour from the Panther Creek Pack. This Pack consisting of 2 two adult wolves, has been located in the east-central portion of the ASNF throughout May.

Rim Pack (AF1305)

In May AF1305 remained separated from M1130. On May 20, M1130 was lethally removed in New Mexico due to habitual nuisance issues. AF1305 has remained in the traditional Rim Pack territory in the southern portion of the ASNF.

Single M1161 (Collared)

In May, M1161 travelled back and forth from the ASNF and the SCAR.

ON THE FAIR:

Tsay o Ah Pack (collared M1343 and AF1283)

During May, the Tsay o Ah Pack was located on the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Coronado Pack (collared AM1051)

In May, the IFT located AM1051 in south-central portions of the Gila Wilderness.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM992, AF923, M1293, m1354 and m1347)

In May, the IFT located this pack within its traditional territory in the west-central portion of the GNF. The IFT continues to document denning behaviour in this pack during the month. On May 26, the IFT counted three pups produced by the Dark Canyon Pack.

Fox Mountain Pack (collared m1396)

In May the IFT documented the Fox Mountain Pack within their traditional territory in the northwest portion of the GNF. Currently the only functioning collar in the Fox Mountain Pack is on m1396. The IFT attempted to trap other members of the Fox Mountain Pack this month to collar more wolves with m1396.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240 and AF1278)

In May, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the Gila National Forest. The IFT documented denning behaviour in this pack during May.

Lava Pack (collared M1285 and F1295)

In May the Lava Pack was located in its traditional territory in the northwest portion of the Gila Wilderness. The IFT has documented denning behaviour with this pack in May. A diversionary food cache has been set up and maintained to prevent depredations by the Lava Pack.

Luna Pack (collared AM1155, AF1115, and m1398)

In May, AM1155 and AF1115 of the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north-central portion of the GNF. The IFT has not documented any denning activity from the Luna Pack this month.

Mangas Pack (collared M1296)

In May, M1296 travelled within the northern portion of the GNF in New Mexico and east of the Gila National Forest boundary.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1387, AF1251, m1386 and f1392)

In May, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-central portion of the GNF. On May 17, the IFT counted six pups produced by the Prieto Pack.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF903 and M1345)

During May, the IFT located AF903 travelling with M1345 within the traditional San Mateo Pack territory. No denning behaviour has been documented from this pack during this month.

Willow Springs Pack (collared AM1185 and f1390)

Throughout May, the IFT located the Willow Springs Pack in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

M1284 (collared)

Wolf M1284 was located once in May during the weekly telemetry flight on May 6 south east of Cub Mountain.

M1338 (collared)

Throughout May, M1338 was located travelling in the central portion of the ASNF with f1335 from the Maverick Pack.

mp1350 (collared)

Throughout May, mp1350 has been located near a residence in New Mexico several times. The IFT has hazed the wolf to discourage this behaviour.

MORTALITIES

No significant activity to report.

INCIDENTS

During May there were 10 livestock depredation reports involving wolves and one nuisance report.

On May 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf on private property near the lower Frisco River in New Mexico. The investigation determined that the cow had been killed by domestic dogs.

On May 5, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Strayhorse in Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by a wolf.

On May 7, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in New Mexico. The investigation determined the cow died of unknown causes.

On May 7, Wildlife Services investigated a several dead calves south of Lyman Lake in Arizona. The calves had been killed by coyotes.

On May 8, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Strayhorse in Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by a wolf.

On May 9, Wildlife Services investigated two dead yearling cows near Gallo Mountain New Mexico. The investigation determined the cows had been killed by wolves.

On May 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in New Mexico. The investigation determined the cow was killed by wolves.

On May 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf on private land in New Mexico. The investigation confirmed the cow had been killed by a wolf.

On May 18, the IFT received several reports from New Mexico about a wolf in close proximity to people and buildings. The IFT determined it was wolf M1130 who was released in April with Rim AF1305. On May 20, after several attempts to capture M1130 a lethal removal order was issued. On May 20, the lethal removal order was carried out for M1130.

On May 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Strayhorse in Arizona. The investigation confirmed the cow had been killed by a wolf.

On May 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in near the Magas Ranch in New Mexico. The investigation determined the calf was killed a wolf.

On May 28, Wildlife Services investigated four injured calves near Strayhorse in Arizona. The investigation determined the calves had been injured by a wolf.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On May 13, the IFT gave a wolf program update and presentation on the new 10j rule to the Payson Habitat Partnership Committee.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In May, Mitchell started his internship with the USFWS. Thanks for your help Mitchell!

  1. Endangered Species Updates June 1-30, 2015

Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

At the end of June 2015 the wild Mexican wolf population consisted of 46 wolves with functional radio collars dispersed among 19 packs and three single wolves. Members of the IFT have started pup counts this month and have so far counted 28 pups produced by six packs in the MWEPA.

IN ARIZONA:

Bluestem Pack (collared AF1042, m1331, f1333, m1382, m1404, and f1405)

In June, the Bluestem Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the central portion of the ASNF. Wolf m1331 has been documented dispersing from the Bluestem Pack and has been located far to the east in New Mexico. The IFT has documented denning behaviour from AF1042 during May. In June AF1042’s collar failed. Bluestem wolves F1333, m1382, m1404 and f1405 have been located in the vicinity during the month. The IFT continued the predation study during the month of June with the Bluestem Pack.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294 and M1342)

In June, the Elk Horn Pack began making broader movements within their traditional territory in the northeast portion of the ASNF. The IFT is now trying to determine whether or not the pack has pups.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038, AF1280 and m1383)

In June, the Hawks Nest Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT is currently conducting a predation study involving the Hawks Nest Pack which commenced in June. On June 21, the IFT received a report that the Hawks Nest Pack was close to livestock. The wolves were scared away and did not return. No wolf killed livestock have been found while the IFT has been conducting this summer’s predation study.

Hoodoo Pack (collared M1290)

In June, M1290 was in the area north-central portion of the ASNF. The IFT has documented M1290 localizing in one area. The IFT is currently trying to confirm if M1290 has a den and pups.

Marble Pack (F1340)

The IFT continues to document a male wolf with a non-function radio collar travelling with F1340 in the northwest-central portion of the ASNF. F1340 continues to display denning behaviour during this month.

Maverick Pack (collared AM1183, AF1291, and f1335)

During June, the Maverick Pack travelled within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and ASNF. Wolf f1335 has been located separate from the Maverick Pack in May and has continued to travel with M1338 in the southern portion of the ASNF. The IFT has not documented denning behaviour from the Maverick Pack this year.

Panther Creek Pack (F1339 and M1394)

The IFT has documented denning behaviour from the Panther Creek Pack. This pack consists of 2 two adult wolves and has been located in the east-central portion of the ASNF throughout June.

Rim Pack (AF1305)

In June, AF1305 has remained in the traditional Rim Pack territory in the southern portion of the ASNF.

Single M1161 (Collared)

In June, M1161 travelled back and forth from the ASNF and the SCAR.

ON THE FAIR:

Tsay o Ah Pack (collared M1343 and AF1283)

During June, the Tsay o Ah Pack was located on the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Coronado Pack (collared AM1051)

In June, the IFT located AM1051 in south-central portions of the Gila Wilderness.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM992, AF923, M1293, m1354 and m1347)

In June, the IFT located this pack within its traditional territory in the west-central portion of the GNF. The IFT continues to document denning behaviour in this pack during the month.

Fox Mountain Pack (collared m1396)

In June, the IFT documented the Fox Mountain Pack within their traditional territory in the northwest portion of the GNF. Currently the only functioning collar in the Fox Mountain Pack is on m1396. The IFT attempted to trap other members of the Fox Mountain Pack this month to collar more wolves with m1396, but efforts were unsuccessful.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240 and AF1278)

In June, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the Gila National Forest. The IFT counted 5 pups produced by the Iron Creek Pack this month.

Lava Pack (collared M1285 and F1295)

In June, the Lava Pack was located in its traditional territory in the northwest portion of the Gila Wilderness. The IFT has documented denning behaviour with this pack. A diversionary food cache has been set up and maintained to potentially prevent livestock depredations by the Lava Pack.

Luna Pack (collared AM1155, AF1115, and m1398)

In June, AM1155 remained in the Luna Pack territory in the north-central portion of the GNF. The IFT has not documented any denning activity from the Luna Pack this month. AF1115’s collar has failed and m1398 has been travelling separate from AM1155 during the month of June.

Mangas Pack (collared M1296)

In June, M1296 travelled within the northern portion of the GNF in New Mexico and east of the Gila National Forest boundary.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1387, AF1251, m1386 and f1392)

In June, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-central portion of the GNF. A food cache is being maintained for this pack to potentially prevent livestock depredations.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF903 and M1345)

During June, the IFT located AF903 travelling with M1345 within the traditional San Mateo Pack territory. No denning behaviour has been documented from this pack during this month.

Willow Springs Pack (collared AM1185, f1390 and f1397)

Throughout June, the IFT located the Willow Springs Pack in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

M1284 (collared)

Wolf M1284 was located twice in late June.   On both occasions the wolf was located southwest of Eckleberger Hill.

M1338 (collared)

Throughout June, M1338 was located travelling in the central portion of the ASNF with f1335 from the Maverick Pack.

mp1350 (collared)

Throughout June, mp1350 travelled within the GNF in New Mexico.

MORTALITIES

No mortalities were documented during June.

INCIDENTS

During June, there were seven livestock depredation reports involving wolves and one nuisance report.

On June 1, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Centerfire New Mexico. The investigation determined that the cow had been killed by a wolf or wolves.

On June 4, Wildlife Services investigated three dead calves near Gallo Mountain in New Mexico. The investigation determined that one of the calves was killed by a wolf and the two other calves were probably killed by wolves.

On June 16, Wildlife Services investigated an incident in New Mexico where a dog was attacked. The investigation determined the dog was attacked and injured by wolves. Based on the location of the interaction, the IFT believes the Iron Creek Pack was responsible for the incident.

On June 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Cox Canyon in New Mexico. The investigation determined the calf was killed by uncollared wolves.

On June 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Crescent Lake in Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by a wolf. The IFT determined the Marble Pack was responsible for the kill.

On June 21, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf near Water Canyon in Arizona. The investigation determined the calf died from unknown causes.

On June 27, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow near Centerfire in New Mexico. The investigation determined the cow was killed by wolves.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On June 6, the IFT conducted a wolf education booth at the WMAT fishing derby at Bog Tank.

On June 23 and 24 the IFT gave two presentations regarding the new 10j rule to AGFD field personnel in Arizona.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In June, Kent Laudon started his new position with the USFWS as the IFT supervisor. Welcome to the project Kent!

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at(800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

From Johnny Rodrigues, Chairman for Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force (www.zctfofficialsite.org)

  1. ZCTF Report 29th June 2015

UPDATE ON ELEPHANT EXPORT

For the past few months, we have been fighting for the release of the baby elephants which were captured in Hwange National Park for export to China. Late last year, approximately 7 elephants were sent to Dubai.

The latest information from Hwange National Park is that the 27 elephants are still due to be exported to China, despite all our efforts to prevent this from happening. Cages have been brought in and have been moved close to the bomas and rehearsals are being done to move the elephants.

We have heard that a number of elephants have already been sent to China. We have photos of 2 export permits. The first is a permit for 4 elephants, issued on 6th November 2014 and signed by Walter Mzimbi on the 6th October 2014. Both permits state that the exports were done by Terrestrial Safaris which is owned by the Zimbabwe Tourism Authority. The 4 elephants were sent to Kinjian Safari Park in Guangzhou, China.

The second permit is for the export of 8 elephants and 2 crocodiles, issued on the 6th January 2015. It was also signed by Walter Mzimbi on the 6th December 2014. These animals were sent to Taiyan Zoo in South China.

What we found a little bit strange is the fact that the purple stamp in the bottom right hand corner of these 2 permits are in exactly the same position. A contingent of Chinese people have taken over the area where the capture unit is in Hwange and there are no Zimbabweans there.

ELEPHANTS KILLED IN MATUSADONA

2 elephants have been killed in Matusadona.

  1. ZCTF Report 10th July 2015

THE ELEPHANT STORY

In January last year, we heard that Rowan Martin and Hank Jenkins were tasked with going around Zimbabwe to locate some elephants to be exported to China. They were apparently paid quite well for this and they finally decided on Hwange National Park.

In August last year, tourists in Hwange National Park started complaining about helicopters flying overhead, frightening the elephant herds. When the herds bolted, the babies left behind were captured and put into a boma in Umtshibi which is about 15 km from Main Camp in Hwange National Park. These babies were between 2 and 5 years old, still dependent on their mothers for milk. Dr Joyce Poole verified the ages of these elephants.

International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves…

This is truly amazing … how we change the world…
Remember when the wolves were introduced back into Yellowstone National Park about 20 years ago?
There was a lot of debate about whether or not it was a good thing.
I don’t know your thoughts on this but have a look at this video clip.
How often do we wonder, what the heck difference does one animal make in the
Greater scheme of things?
Well, here is the answer!!!
Sit back and enjoy this amazing video on how just one animal has changed the environment.
https://www.youtube.com/embed/ysa5OBhXz-Q?feature=player_embedded
(this link was sent to us by Wulf D. Haacke)

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 117

Kia – A Wolf’s Love for a Leopard

Thousands upon thousands of years ago a legend was told by the too great clans; this is the legend known as of Kai and Midnight’s Eve.

Many say that wolves travel with their packs, and many say that animals should stay with their own kin….but this wolf was different for he did not care much what other wolves do or what the other animals think…for he loved a Leopard, although it is normally forbidden for animals to love other animals like that. He travelled alone searching for peace and his lost love, but every time he got closer, she moved farther away. He encountered many dangers on his quest and many friends, but didn’t stay long enough to make himself remembered.

One day, he went out and crossed paths with another wolf and they stared each other down…the other wolf was part of the Kodaspring clan, his name was Kido, a strong and wise alpha who was on his way home from hunting and thought that Kai was going to steal his far share of the catch for himself, so he was ready and in defence mode. Kai did not like the idea that they were going to fight so he turned his back and walked away. Kido was confused by now and thought he was retreating to get his clan, so he attacked Kai. He tore at his side and scratched his right eye, making it a deep wound with chunks of flesh and blood flying everywhere. Kai stood up and tried to walk away, searching for his loved one, no time to waste was all he was thinking. Kido saw that he did not want to fight and figured he was no threat so he let him go. Kai continued into the thick, foggy forest until he came across an open field of hard, rocky ice land, for he was leaving the land he knew his whole life and would probably never return to Woodfall ever again. So he set forth for the long journey ahead, with high hopes of seeing Midnight’s Eve very soon.

Kai was beginning to get dizzy from the wounds Kido had caused him and passed out on the icy cold ground. About a week later, he awoke to a cave of moss and trees so dark that light barely showed through the trees. He got up and went to the open area, where he was confronted with a group of Leopards. He looked around and realized that he was in the land called Piana, land of the Cats. He looked up to see the moon, but the moon and sun were out together and they had the sign of Leo, both were dark but shown light. Kai found this place fascinating and went on the search to find his love; he knew she was close by, he could smell her. He howled to let her know he was there and sure enough she came running to him. But she was attacked by a group of larger Leopards and dragged by the tail and neck to an opening in front of every clan member of Piana to be judged for treason. Kai went for her aid but was struck down. He awoke next to her and saw that the Leopards were going to kill them both – her for falling in love with a wolf and him for setting foot on sacred land. Kai saw that Midnight’s Eve was scared not for herself, but for him, and she went to aid off the leopards, but was being overpowered, so Kai went for her assistance and they were able to make an opening through them and ran for cover.

They were hiding until the opening was clear and left Piana to find a new life elsewhere, were they would be accepted. Before they could even set a paw out of Piana, a group of wolves and leopards were gathered there and the alpha of Woodfall, Kou, and the leader of Piana, Lansing, were in front of the two great clans to stop Kai and Midnight’s Eve from leaving. Kai’s clan had tracked him down for leaving sanctuary of the land and to punish him. Lansing was to decide what he should do to his daughter, the daughter of the clans leader! The Leopards decide that she would be killed on side and went for her throat. Midnight’s Eve heard a loud rip and the sound of flesh being torn and blood-smell filling the air, but she felt no pain.. were did it come from, she wondered? She looked down and saw that it was Kai, who had jumped in front of the attacking Leopard to protect her and took the fatal bite to the throat. Midnight’s Eve saw her love fall and her heart felt as cold as the ice land’s ground. Both clans saw the tears of the Leopard leader’s daughter fall to the ground and die next to her loved one.

The sky above started to shake and acid rain fell down upon the land like boulders; the ground shook and caved upwards causing mountains to form, the moon shook away from the sun and disappeared, and the sun was like a bright fire and no more shady and full of dark. The trees grew greener and some even turned different colours; the ground shot up grass that resembled small tiny trees over the icy land. The icy land was no more. The planet was blowing strong winds of anger. The clans looked down at the two dead bodies, but couldn’t see them no more. They turned into a mere spirit being shot around all over the planet and disappearing as a bright blue light. The clans believed that a wolf’s love caused all of this and called it a wolves curse. They believe every time the sky bleeds the water, a loved one is lost and Kai feels there pain as he did when he lost his own love. When the earth shakes, it is when someone is in pain and Kai shows his pain. When the sun comes out and the moon is gone, it shows that Kai is watching all of us, and when the sun goes down and the moon comes up, Kai is protecting us.

And when the wind blows, it is Kai running with Midnight’s Eve.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Although it is still the deep of winter, some of the last nights were not as cold anymore, the days are quite pleasant, and there is a certain smell in the air that indicates that spring is not far. That also means that the gang has started to shed their thick winter undercoat with fluff flying around everywhere. It must be an itchy process because they spend hours scratching and chewing through their coats with their front teeth, and the undercoat on the back of their hind legs can be plucked out like the feathers of a boiled chicken. So I’m back to a house where the carpets and blankets are covered with fluff, and wolf hair is once again becoming the most prominent fibre in our diet 😉

For Ascar II and Kajack II, it’s the first time that they shed a full undercoat, and it’s not that bad yet, but with Taima and Aqua, I have my hands full (in the true meaning of the word). It’s especially bad with Aqua’s long hair that has the tendency of tangling into Rasta locks that have to be cut off, and since he doesn’t like to be brushed more often than once in a blue moon, this time of year is always a nightmare for me. The dry grass that gets stuck in his coat doesn’t make the task any easier.

Ascar II and Kajack II are heading for their second birthdays and reaching sexual maturity, which results in Ascar II being busy mounting Kajack II all day long. He takes it with the patience of an angel, just looking at me with a bored look in his eyes as though asking me, “What does he think he is going to achieve with this?” He also tries his luck with Taima in between, but she is not as good-natured as Kajack II, giving him a good piece of her mind every time he tries.

While Kajack II has become calmer, being the gentle one who wants nothing but the pack living in peace and harmony, Aqua II is still rather wild, not yet in control of his strength and temper, always testing his limits and our patience. Taima has turned into a perfect leader, ruling her pack with all the skills one would expect from an alpha. She has realised that Aqua’s vision is not what it should be, especially in the dark, and makes sure that she is on his side when he goes outside after sunset. If there is turmoil at the front gate because of people passing or cars stopping, she will chase him back into the house, because she knows he is vulnerable and wants to keep him out of danger. Aqua, on the other hand, is not so keen on being “babysat” too much, and so the two sometimes get into an argument; nothing serious, and he will quickly give in to her and her demands. The only time he really gets angry is when Ascar II approaches him in his boisterous manner, tapping him on his nose with his paw, and when Aqua then growls at him he will start licking his face, apologising for his behaviour. Unfortunately it never takes long until he has forgotten about it and does it again, and even when Aqua gets angry and snaps at him he will not give up and try again. It looks like learning from his actions and the reactions of the others is not really his thing. When he gets reprimanded for his behaviour by the others or us he will whimper like a puppy and cannot apparently understand what he did wrong; he is a real chancer, but also a little charmer who knows exactly how to turn things his way.

Will be continued…