Volume 12, Issue 149, March 2017

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 12, Issue 149, March 2017

From the Editor’s Desk

Another month, another newsletter, and more bad news for wolves in the US with those living in the states of Wyoming and Alaska now being subject to particularly destructive plans. But as long as dumb people vote dumb leaders into positions where they can cause serious damage, there will be little hope for anything constructive.

One example of hair-raising state dumbness shows in the brief news snippet from Slovenia we have for you this month: a government initiative to cull 20% (= 10) of the 50 wild wolves that roam that country in order “to protect livestock”, even though scientific studies have shown that this measure has just the opposite effect. And in Italy, limelight-hungry state politicians still try to defy opposition from provincial leaders to press through their wish that wild wolves be killed, just to show who’s got the longer [insert what you think fits in here]. Sorry, but even I have no words that could be used to comment on this without resulting in this newsletter being blocked by mail filters.

Our Wolves and Wolfdogs section this time provides background information on the sick US “War on Wolves”, this month’s poem picks up the theme, and Erin briefly updates us on her experiences so far with canine “anger management” in her pack.

Till next month,
Ed.

Upcoming Events

You are invited by the International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org) to the 4th Howl at the Moon Gala

An Event to support the International Wolf Center’s Mission.

When?

Thursday, May 18, 2017 from 5:30 PM to 9:00 PM CDT

Program: Social Hour, Silent Auction, Dinner, Program and Live Action

Where?

Midland Hills Country Club

2001 Fulham Street
Roseville, MN 55113, USA

  • Contact

David Kline
International Wolf Center
763-560-7374 ext. 230
david@wolf.org

Get registered at: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07edt8lbo47ec70819&oseq=&c=&ch=

 

Say Yes to New Adventures!

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs.

Wolf Family Rendezvous
April 1-2

Spend quality time together learning about the north woods home of the wolf through hikes, crafts, games and observing our ambassador wolves.
Learn more here. http://r20.rs6.net

Geocache Adventures In Wolf Range
June 10 – 11

Test your backcountry navigational skills while you discover the worldwide scavenger hunt pastime known as geocaching!

Learn more here.

Wolves After Dark
June 30 – July 1

Here’s your opportunity to participate in a “Citizen Science” project and document important behavioural data critical to understanding the Exhibit Pack dynamics.
Learn more here

Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

News from the Wolf Front

National

From HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (www.huskyromi.co.za)

The HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s 2017 Calendar is still available. It is R 50 and all proceeds will go straight to the sanctuary. P&P not included.

You can order yours by contacting Nolia Meyer at nolia@pentasure.ws or
sending an SMS to 072 622 1764

Raffle sale to raise funds

Young Designer Elizma van Heerden has donated one of her designer outfits to Husky Romy Sanctuary to help raise funds. The outfits consists of a cape, coat, top and pants in size 10 tall, with a painted wolf done by Sue-Mari Clark.

The draw will take place at the Fantasy Fayre held at Moorse Castle in Muldersdrift on April 2nd, where Husky Romi will have a stall.

Raffles prices are R 40 per entry or R 100 for 3 entries.

Please also support this raffle sale to raise funds. You don’t have to be at the event to be able to win this awesome prize and it can be posted as well!!

For banking details and further information please contact Nolia Meyer via email, Whatsapp or FB message at nolia@pentasure.ws/0726221764.

You can see pictures of the outfit here.

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: It’s up to us to save Mexican gray wolves!

The Mexican gray wolf, also known as the lobo, continues to face extinction in the wild – and it’s up to us to save them.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has proposed releasing two packs of Mexican gray wolves into the wild. However, more releases in more approved locations are critical to the survival of this struggling wolf population.

Unless more Mexican gray wolves are released, and additional populations are established, they are doomed to go extinct in the wild.

URGENT: Tell FWS that we need more lobos released into the wild: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Ce1wO_yuGBau_K1cmr-jeg

Just over 100 lobos cling to survival in the wild lands of New Mexico and Arizona. And, it’s not just numbers that are the problem. Genetic diversity is low. That can lead to smaller litters and poorer pup survival. That’s a spiral that could easily lead to extinction in the wild.

For years, anti-wolf forces in New Mexico and Arizona have driven stiff opposition to lobo recovery. Defenders has gone to court several times in recent years to protect Mexican gray wolves. If we lose the lobo it will go down in history as a completely preventable extinction.

Scientists on FWS’ recovery team agree that lobos require at least three linked populations in suitable habitat. Habitat capable of supporting two additional populations exists in the Grand Canyon region and in northern New Mexico southern Colorado.

The future of Mexican gray wolves is in our hands. Demand that FWS act now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=y-r98vfw5S6mkX_od3WGHQ

  1. USA: EMERGENCY: Tragic news for Wyoming wolves

Heartbreaking news from Wyoming.

A federal appeals court has stripped Wyoming wolves of Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. That means after two years of federal protections, the days of indiscriminate killing in most of Wyoming are back.

I promise you this: We will NEVER give up the fight to protect and restore gray wolves. But I can’t lie – this is a shocking setback.

Stand up for wolves and other imperilled wildlife with an emergency donation to Defenders: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=wosE19hbEMT50-AWXnGoKg

Here’s what happened.

You may recall that after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stripped Wyoming wolves of ESA protection in 2012, Wyoming turned about 85 percent of the state into a free fire zone. In this so-called ‘predator zone’ anyone could kill a wolf at any time and for any reason.

With your support we went to federal court later that year to try and overturn the delisting. And, in 2014, a federal court held in our favour. Wyoming wolves were once again protected under the ESA.

Last week’s appeals court decision reversed the lower court. So the delisting is back in force.

In all my years as a wildlife biologist and as a conservation leader, I have never seen a more cruel and hard-hearted political environment for wildlife protection.

But you and I know that most Americans favour strong wildlife protection. And if the true voices of Americans can make themselves heard, this despicable era will be behind us.

Let your voice and your love for wildlife be heard with a special emergency gift to Defenders: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=vKfSpBBd6nRF6kY0RCEdqg

For the wildlife you and I love.

 

3. USA: Congressional Attacks on Wildlife and the ESA continue GUTTING THE ESA?

Recently, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee held hearings on legislation to “modernize” the Endangered Species Act, part of a push by certain lawmakers to roll back environmental regulations and protections.

Learn more here: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=biuygLPg1dcTBXWdXebw0A

 

  1. USA: Senate to vote on the fate of wolves and bears in Alaska!

Wolves and bears in Alaska desperately need your help.

The Senate is preparing to vote on H.J. Res. 69 – legislation that would revoke a regulation that helps protect wolves, bears and other carnivores on national wildlife refuges in Alaska from brutal killing practices.

If this bill succeeds, Alaska could authorize extreme killing methods, such as shooting mother bears with cubs and killing wolves with pups, on public lands that belong to all of us: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=JLvjMy0jmxuSN_x4K17MsQ

This is our last chance to stop this deadly legislation – the time to act is now.

Please, urge your Senators to oppose H.J. Res. 69 and to protect America’s wildlife!

Anti-wildlife Members of Congress are using an obscure law called the Congressional Review Act to toss aside a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) regulation that restricts gruesome methods of “predator control” on Alaska national wildlife refuges. In addition, discarding this rule could slam the door on any future regulations that aim to conserve these animals on refuge lands.

Alaska’s scheme targets wolves and bears through extreme methods, including killing mother bears and cubs, killing wolves and pups in their dens, and trapping, baiting and using airplanes to scout and shoot bears.

A Senate vote on this resolution is imminent. We need you to speak out for wildlife and let your Senators know that H.J. Res. 69 is unacceptable!

Please, take action today to help wolves, bears and other predators: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=UStvkh_uHRvO3iLWTAueKQ

 

From California Wolfcenter (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com)

  1. Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project Monthly Update

Endangered Species Updates January 1-31, 2017

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.

Past updates may be viewed on either website, or interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf telemetry flight location information please visit www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/RWL.cfm.

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to:(928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

On January 18, 2017, the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on the Preliminary Injunction on releases of Mexican wolves in New Mexico. The Court has not yet ruled.

The Mexican Wolf Executive Committee met January 25, 2017, at the Arizona Game and Fish Department office in Phoenix, Arizona.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) indicate wolves younger than 24 months or pups. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started in November 2016 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted from January 26, 2017 through February 5, 2017. The IFT documented a minimum of 113 Mexican wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico at the end of 2016. In 2015, the minimum count was 97 wild wolves. At the end of the annual count and capture operation, there were 68 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Wolves with functioning radio collars during the month of January are listed by studbook number in the pack updates below.

Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population is experiencing the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.

January pack updates include the annual helicopter count and capture operation which occurred from January 26, through February 5, 2017.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and AF1335)

In January, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF). During the annual count and capture operation, two uncollared wolves were documented travelling with AM1338 and AF1335. AF1335 was captured, re-collared, and released back into its territory.

Bluestem Pack (collared M1382, F1488, F1443, fp1562, fp1563, mp1568 and mp1573)

In January, the Bluestem Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Some wolves from the Bluestem Pack displayed dispersal behaviour during the month. F1443 continued to travel with m1447, of the Diamond Pack, in New Mexico near the Arizona border. F1488 was documented travelling with another wolf near Alpine. M1382 was documented travelling with AF1339 of the Panther Creek Pack. During the annual count and capture operation, F1488 and two Bluestem pups (mp1568 and mp1573) were captured, collared, and released back into their territory.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, AM1342, mp1474 and mp1471)

In January, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north eastern portion of the ASNF. During the annual count and capture operation, a female Elk Horn pup was captured, collared, and released back into its territory. The IFT has yet to receive results from genetic analysis of a blood sample taken from the female Elk Horn pup that will reveal if the pup was wild born or a cross fostered animal from captivity.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038)

In January, the Hawks Nest Pack consisted of one collared wolf, AM1038. AM1038 made wide dispersal movements within the north central portion of the ASNF throughout the month and was located in New Mexico in the GNF toward the end of the month. During the annual count and capture operation, AM1038 was documented travelling alone.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1441, fp1549, fp1550 and f1567)

January, the Hoodoo Pack remained in the north central portion of the ASNF. During the annual count and capture operation, AF1333 was captured, re-collared, and released back into its territory. Sub-adult m1441 was documented travelling separately from the Hoodoo Pack in January. During the annual count and capture operation an uncollared female sub-adult wolf (f1567) travelling with m1441 was captured, collared, and released back into its territory.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In January, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AF1339, AM1394, mp1483, fp1484 and mp1486)

In January, the Panther Creek Pack was located in the east central portion of the ASNF. During the annual count and capture operation, Bluestem M1382 was documented travelling with AF1339; AM1394 was not located during the month of January. AF1339 and a male pup were captured, collared, and released back into their territory. The IFT has yet to receive results from genetic analysis of a blood sample taken from the male Panther Creek pup that will reveal if the pup was wild born or a cross fostered animal from captivity.

 

ON THE FAIR:

Diamond Pack (collared m1447, f1557, mp1559, fp1560, fp1570, mp1571 and mp1572)

In January, the Diamond Pack was located in the northern portion of the ASNF and on state lands north of the ASNF. Sub-adult m1447 continued to be documented travelling with F1443, of the Bluestem Pack, in New Mexico near the Arizona border. During the annual count and capture operation, AM1249 and mp1558 were captured and removed to captivity in response to repeated and confirmed cattle depredations. Three pups (fp1570, mp1571 and mp1572) were captured, collared, and released back into their territory.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343 and AF1283)

In January, the Tsay-o-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Baldy Pack (collared M1347 and f1445)

The Baldy Pack was not located during the month of January.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM992)

During January, the IFT located this pack within and outside of its traditional territory in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278 and mp1556)

During January, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. During the annual count and capture operation, all members of the Iron Creek Pack were observed from helicopter travelling together along the northern edge of the Gila Wilderness.

Lava Pack (collared F1405 and AM1285)

During January, F1405 (formerly of the Buckalou Pack) was located within the Lava Pack’s traditional territory in the south eastern portion of the GNF;F1405 is now considered a member of the Lava Pack. During the annual count and capture operation, AM1285 was captured, recollared, and released into the Lava Pack territory.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293, AF1346 and mp1561)

During January, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness. During the annual count and capture operation, AF1346 was captured, collared, and released into the Leopold pack territory.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487 and mp1554)

During January, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. An independent trapper captured AF1158 in a coyote trap; the IFT responded immediately and recollared AM1158 (collar had failed in 2015) and released the animal on site into its territory. During the annual count and capture operation, AF1487 was captured, recollared, and released back into the Luna pack territory.

Mangas Pack (collared M1296 and F1439)

During January, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in north western portions of the GNF in New Mexico.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, M1386, m1455, f1456, M1552, f1553, fp1565 and mp1569)

During January, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. AF1251 continues to be located with M1398 and other members of the Prieto Pack. During the annual count and capture operation, AF1251, M1398, fp1565, and an uncollared pup were observed travelling together. Throughout January, including visual observation from the helicopter, f1553 was documented travelling with AM1285 of the SBP Pack. M1386, m1455, f1456, and M1552 continued to display dispersal behaviour within the GNF. M1552 was documented making a large distance dispersal movement north of I-40 in early January before quickly returning to Mexican wolf occupied range within the GNF. M1455 was observed travelling alone. AF1251, f1456, and an uncollared pup (mp1569) were captured, collared and released during the annual count and capture operation.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399)

During January, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF. All members of the San Mateo Pack were observed from the helicopter travelling together during the annual population survey.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284)

During January, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. During the annual count and capture operation, AM1284 was observed travelling with f1553 of the Prieto Pack.

Willow Springs Pack (collared F1397)

January, the IFT documented the Willow Springs Pack within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. During the annual count and capture operation, F1397 was documented travelling alone.

Single collared AM1155

During January, AM1155 was documented travelling within New Mexico. During the annual count and capture operation, AM1155 was documented travelling alone.

Single collared M1398

During January, M1398 was documented travelling with AF1251 of the Prieto Pack in the west central portion of the GNF.

Single collared M1354

During January, M1354 was documented travelling in southern portions of the GNF and northern Gila Wilderness. M1354 was observed travelling alone during the annual count and capture operation and later observed travelling with a sibling wolf (f1444).

Single collared f1444

During January, f1444 was documented travelling mostly within west central portions of the Gila National Forest (GNF). Although f1444 continued to utilize portions of its natal pack’s territory, it has not been located with other members of its pack and is now considered a single wolf. During the annual count and capture operations, f1444 was observed travelling with a sibling wolf (M1354).

MORTALITIES

During January, F1437 was located dead in Arizona. The incident is under investigation.

INCIDENTS

During the month of January, there were five confirmed wolf kills and one nuisance report.

On January 13, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, Arizona. The investigation determined the calf died from unknown causes.

On January 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by coyotes.

On January 26, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by coyotes.

On January 26, Wildlife Services investigated two dead calves in Catron County, New Mexico. The investigation determined both calves were confirmed wolf kills.

On January 27, the IFT received a report of a collared wolf observed travelling into Alpine Heights in Arizona on the night of January 26. The IFT learned a homeowner in Alpine Heights had an animal get into an outside trash container that same night. The IFT responded on January 27 and found tracks from a domestic dog in the snow around the trash container.

On January 28, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On January 30, Wildlife Services investigated two dead calves in Apache County, Arizona. The investigations determined both of the calves were confirmed wolf kills.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

January 10, the Fish and Wildlife Service attended the White Mountain Apache Tribal Council meeting to listen to concerns regarding funding and management of Mexican wolves on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

On January 25, the Fish and Wildlife Service attended the White Mountain Apache Tribal Council meeting to discuss funding and management of Mexican wolves on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.

On January 26, the Fish and Wildlife Service presented in Albuquerque to members of Amigos, the Southwest Regional Forest Service Retirees club.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In January, Genevieve Fuller and Craig Zurek were hired as wolf biologists on the Arizona Game and Fish Department contingent of the IFT. Genevieve will be based out of the Pinetop wolf office and will assume responsibility for the data collection and on-the-ground management of wolf packs in the northern region of occupied wolf range in Arizona. Craig will be based out of the Alpine wolf office and will assume responsibility for the data collection and on-the-ground management of wolf packs in the southern region of occupied wolf range in Arizona.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at(505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at(800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

  1. Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project

Monthly Update – February 1-28, 2017

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

The Fish and Wildlife Service convened a Mexican wolf recovery planning workshop in Queretaro, Mexico February 7-10, 2017 to continue discussions on biological information for the Vortex model and habitat niche model.  These models will inform the FWS’ development of a revision to the 1982 Mexican Wolf Recovery Plan.  The workshop was attended by representatives from Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Mexican government agencies CONANP and SEMARNAT, the Forest Service and independent scientists from the U.S. and Mexico.

The Fish and Wildlife Service met with the New Mexico State Director of Wildlife Services on February 13, 2017, to discuss the Mexican wolf range maps on the Service’s website, which inform the public on where due care is needed for trapping.

On February 21, 2017, the Fish and Wildlife Service and Arizona Game and Fish Department met with the Arizona Cattle Growers Association in Phoenix, Arizona to discuss the status of the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, including the 2017 proposed initial release and translocation plan, status of revision to the 1982 recovery plan and depredation compensation programs.

The Fish and Wildlife Service met with the Forest Service in Albuquerque, NM on February 23, 2017 to discuss communication issues and the status of the Forest Service’s National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) review for proposed release sites in Arizona and New Mexico.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) indicate wolves younger than 24 months or pups. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The IFT completed the annual year-end population survey which started in November 2016 and concluded with helicopter count and capture operations conducted in late January through early February 2017. The IFT documented a minimum of 113 Mexican wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico at the end of 2016. At the end of February, there were 67 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Wolves with functioning radio collars are listed by studbook number in the pack updates below.

Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population is experiencing the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. This allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338 and AF1335)

In February, the Bear Wallow Pack was located within their traditional territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).

Bluestem Pack (collared M1382, F1488, fp1562, fp1563, mp1568 and mp1573)

In February, the Bluestem Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. Some wolves from the Bluestem Pack continue to travel separate from the pack. F1443 continues to be documented with m1447, of the Diamond Pack, in New Mexico near the Arizona border. This pair has remained together for three months and is now considered a separate pack and will soon be given a name. F1488 was documented travelling with another wolf near Alpine. M1382 was documented travelling with AF1339 of the Panther Creek Pack. Bluestem male pup, mp1568, was found dead in Arizona and the incident is under investigation.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, mp1471, mp1474 and fp147X)

In February, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north eastern portion of the ASNF. The temporary studbook number, fp147X, for the female pup that was captured, collared and released in January will be replaced with the correct studbook number once genetic analysis results are available to determine if the pup was wild born or a captive born pup that was cross-fostered into the Elk Horn Pack in April of 2016.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038)

In February, the Hawks Nest Pack consisted of one collared wolf, AM1038. AM1038 previously made wide dispersal movements within the north central portion of the ASNF and was then located in New Mexico in the GNF toward the beginning of the month. By the end of February, AM1038 was documented back in Arizona and travelling with the Diamond Pack.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1441, fp1549, fp1550 and f1567)

In February, the Hoodoo Pack remained in the north central portion of the ASNF. Sub-adult wolves m1441 and f1567 were documented travelling together and apart from the Hoodoo Pack. The IFT is conducting prey carcass investigations as part of a kill rate study for both the Hoodoo Pack and the new pair m1441 and f1567 during the month of February.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In February, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AF1339, AM1394, mp1483, fp1484, mp1486, and mp148X)

In February, the Panther Creek Pack was located in the east central portion of the ASNF. Bluestem M1382 continues to be located travelling with AF1339. AM1394 was not located during the month of February. Pups m1483, fp1484, mp1486, and mp148X have all been travelling separately from AF1339 and M1382 during the month of February. Male pups mp1483 and mp1486 have both been documented travelling in the Gila National Forest in NM. The temporary studbook number, mp148X, for the male pup that was captured, collared and released in January will be replaced with the correct studbook number once genetic analysis results are available.

ON THE FAIR:

Diamond Pack (collared f1557, mp1559, fp1560, fp1570, mp1571 and mp1572)

In February, the Diamond Pack was located in the northern portion of the ASNF and on state lands north of the ASNF.  Sub-adult m1447 has been travelling with F1443, of the Bluestem Pack, in New Mexico near the Arizona border for three months and is no longer considered part of the Diamond Pack. AM1038 of the Hawks Nest Pack was documented travelling with wolves from the Diamond Pack this month.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343 and AF1283)

In February, the Tsay-o-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Baldy Pack (collared M1347 and f1445)

The Baldy Pack was not located during the month of February.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM992)

AM992 was located dead in February, the incident is under investigation.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278 and mp1556)

During February, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).

Lava Pack (collared F1405 and AM1285)

During February, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south eastern portion of the GNF.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293, AF1346 and mp1561)

During February, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158 and AF1487)

During February, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the Gila National Forest. The IFT has been unable to locate mp1554 and it is now considered fate unknown.

Mangas Pack (collared M1296 and F1439)

During February, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north western portion of the GNF.

New Pack (F1443 and m1447)

F1443, from the Bluestem Pack, and m1447, from the Diamond Pack, have been documented travelling together for a minimum of three months and will receive a pack name. They have been using a territory south of Luna near the Arizona border.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, M1398, M1386, m1455, f1456, M1552, fp1565 and mp1569)

During February, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. After being located with the Prieto Pack for a month M1398 is now considered paired with AF1251 and the new breeding male. f1553 continued to be documented travelling with AM1285 of the SBP Pack and is now considered paired with AM1285 and the new breeding female. M1386, m1455, and M1552 continued to display dispersal behaviour within the GNF. mp1569 is also displaying dispersal behaviour and was documented travelling east as far as portions of the Cibola National Forest. On February 11, f1456 was documented travelling with M1354; they continued to travel together through the remainder of the month.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399)

During February, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AM1284 and f1553)

During February, the SBP Pack continued to use their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. f1553 continued to be documented travelling with the SBP Pack and is now considered paired with AM1285 and the new breeding female.

Willow Springs Pack (collared F1397)

February, the IFT documented the Willow Springs Pack within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.

Single collared AM1155

During February, AM1155 was documented travelling within New Mexico.

Single collared M1398

M1398 is now considered part of the Prieto Pack; see above.

Single collared M1354

February, M1354 was documented travelling within its former natal pack territory (Dark Canyon Pack) with f1456 of the Prieto Pack.

Single collared f1444

During February, f1444 was documented travelling mostly within west central portions of the GNF.

MORTALITIES

During February, AM992 of the Dark Canyon Pack was located dead in New Mexico. The incident is under investigation.

During February, mp1568 of the Bluestem Pack was located dead in Arizona. The incident is under investigation.

INCIDENTS

During the month of February, there was one confirmed wolf kill and seven nuisance reports.

On February 3, a homeowner in Nutrioso, Arizona reported there were seven wolves on private property near a pen holding alpacas near a residence. The homeowner used a vehicle to scare the wolves away. IFT personnel responded and located wolf tracks on the property near the alpaca pen. IFT personnel used collar signals to confirm the Elk Horn Pack had been responsible for the nuisance report. IFT personnel pursued the Elk Horn Pack and hazed the wolves from the adjacent area. The homeowner advised that on the night of January 29, 2017 one of their dogs had been injured by what they thought was a coyote, but they were concerned a wolf could have injured it. Wildlife Services investigated the injuries on the homeowner’s dog on February 7, and determined that it was probable that the injuries had been caused by a wolf. GPS points do not implicate the Elk Horn Pack in an incident in Nutrioso on January 29.

On February 7, F1488 and another wolf were observed in a residential area of Alpine, Arizona by a homeowner. The homeowner hazed the wolves to an adjacent property with a vehicle where a second homeowner shot a firearm which caused the wolves to leave. IFT personnel responded and confirmed F1488 was responsible for the report by radio collar signal in the area. On February 8, IFT personnel located the carcass of an elk near the residential area that had been killed by wolves. The carcass was moved and no further incidents were reported at the residence.

On February 10, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, Arizona. The investigation determined the calf was killed by coyotes.

On February 12, a collared wolf was observed in a residential area of Alpine interacting with a dog outside of a residence. IFT personnel responded and observed wolf tracks in the snow that corroborated the report. Radio collar signals of F1488 as well as AM1290 and fp1550 of the Hoodoo Pack were documented in the area.

On February 16, the Nutrioso homeowner with alpacas reported hearing wolves howling from the residence. IFT personnel responded, contacted the homeowner, and documented radio telemetry signals in the area from the Elk Horn Pack. The wolves were successfully hazed from the area using non-injurious explosive scare cartridges. IFT personnel discussed with the homeowner the option of deploying fladry fencing around the alpaca pen to provide a deterrent to wolves.

On February 17, a Nutrioso homeowner reported his teenage daughter had been chased by a pack of wolves while riding horseback on the National Forest. IFT personnel responded and interviewed the father and daughter about the incident. IFT personnel investigated the incident, including interviewing the horseback rider and her father, and determined the rider and her dog were travelling on a trail on February 16, near Gobbler Peak when she rode into the Hoodoo Pack while the wolves were on an elk kill. The dog interacted with the wolves and was described as sniffing, chasing and playing with the wolves. The female indicated one wolf was approximately eight feet from her horse at one point and two or three other wolves were at a distance of 15 to 20 feet from her horse. Based on the description of these wolves, the IFT personnel determined these wolves were likely pups from the Hoodoo Pack. The female reportedly yelled at the wolves then rode away when the wolves did not leave. She indicated the wolves followed her and her dog for a distance of up to half of a mile while yipping and howling. She reported seeing a total of about six to eight wolves. The IFT personnel advised both individuals that though a wolf at distance of eight feet from a human is not desirable, interactions between wolves and dogs are not uncommon and can occur when people with dogs encounter wolves. Wolves vocalizing and following a perceived threat out of an area is a common territorial behaviour exhibited by wolves.

On February 21, the Nutrioso homeowner with alpacas reported hearing wolves howling from the residence. IFT personnel responded and learned that the homeowner observed several wolves and had shot a firearm to scare them off. The IFT confirmed three sets of wolf tracks in the area and made plans to deploy fladry fencing on the following day. Faint signals were heard in the area from the Elk Horn Pack and one of the Panther Creek pups.

On February 22, the Nutrioso homeowner with alpacas reported observing three wolves travelling past their property and again shot a firearm in attempt to scare the animals away. IFT personnel deployed electric charged fladry fencing around the alpaca pens and later installed radio telemetry activated noise and strobe light units on the property that are triggered by signals from wolves with radio collars when they approach the area. The homeowner was aware of their legal right to take, including shooting and killing, any Mexican wolf in the act of attacking livestock or a dog on non-federal land. At the time this report was prepared, there have been no further nuisance reports from this homeowner or on the Elk Horn Pack.

On February 25, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, New Mexico. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On February 28, the Fish and Wildlife Service gave a webinar on the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program to the Western Regional Partnership.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

There are no project personnel updates for the month of February.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at(505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at(800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

USA: Killing wolves and pups on National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska? Take action now

Urgent – Alaska’s Wolves Need Your Help

Killing wolves and their pups, shooting mother bears and cubs in their dens, aerial gunning, snaring… on OUR National Wildlife Refuges?

Some lawmakers are determined to nullify federal protections for denning wolves, hibernating bears, and other predators on national preserves in Alaska. What are wildlife refuges, after all, if not refuges for wildlife?

Your help is needed. Please urge your Senators to stand up for America’s wildlife and the National Wildlife Refuge System by opposing S.J. RES. 18.

Take action here.

Thank you!

From Care2 Action Alerts (actionalerts@care2.com)

Save 10 wolves from slaughter in Slovenia!

We wrote to you recently asking you to help save endangered wolves in Italy from slaughter. Hundreds of thousands of Care2 members like you signed the petition, and it looks like our efforts could be successful. But now there’s another threat to endangered wolves: The government of Slovenia has just announced it will give hunters permission to kill 20% of its tiny wolf population.

Care2 member David L. was horrified, so he started a petition urging the government to abandon the cull immediately. Sign now to save Slovenian wolves from slaughter before it’s too late: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AxJP3/zSl9/GeQa

Slovenian authorities claim the wolf cull will protect livestock and help the country’s farmers, but their decision goes against research that shows culls are ineffective. Hunts break up wolf packs, which leads to more attacks on livestock because wolves are less efficient at hunting on their own.

Only 50 wolves still exist in the forests of Slovenia, but the government is determined to permit the killing of 10 wolves. There are alternative ways to protect livestock that are humane and practical, and these should be used instead. Some examples include enclosing farm animals in fences and installing bright lights.

While the government claims it listened to experts to make this decision, the real reason for this cull is clear. Hunters in Slovenia have a huge lobby that wields incredible amounts of political influence.

Wolves were once on the verge of extinction in Slovenia, until the government made them a protected species. We can’t let these animals be driven toward extinction again. Sign David’s petition now to make your voice heard and stop the wolf slaughter: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AxJP3/zSl9/GeQa

Thank you for all that you do,

From Take Action! at GreaterGood Network (news@greatergood.com)

USA: Time Is Running Out For Gray Wolves!

Mexican gray wolves are the most endangered wolf species and are among some of the most endangered mammals in the world. As of 2015, only 97 Mexican gray wolves remain in the wild, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently confirmed that 14 Mexican gray wolf deaths were documented last year, the most in a single year since 1998 when the federal government began reintroducing the predators to New Mexico and Arizona.
All of the Mexican wolves alive today are descended from captive breeding programs, and years of delaying their release into the world is causing a genetic crisis. Releasing more wolves into the wild will increase their numbers and improve the genetic health of wild populations. Take action by signing our petition and tell the Trump administration that we won’t be backing down from Mexican gray wolf recovery!

Please sign the petition here.

From ForceChange (TakeAction@ForceChange.com)

Finland: Stop Murdering Endangered Wolves Just to Protect Hunters

Endangered wolves are being slaughtered in Finland because hunters feel threatened by them. This is ridiculous and must be opposed. Wolves are majestic and social animals that should be protected, not massacred: https://forcechange.com/185064/stop-murdering-endangered-wolves/

Endangered wolves are being slaughtered in Finland because some hunters claim they are dangerous. However, there are only 235 wolves in the entire country. Furthermore, the wolf is a protected species in the European Union, which should make hunting them illegal.

Sadly, 43 wolves were recently killed as a part of this campaign against the species. This number does not include the 34 other wolves that were also shot by police and hit by cars. To pile on, the government is now permitting 53 more wolves to be killed this year.

In relation, people are rarely attacked by wolves. In fact, one scientific study showed that when wolves were approached 125 times, the wolves ran away all but twice. In the other two instances, mothers solely displayed protective behavior toward their pups and no direct aggressive behavior toward the people who approached them.

Continuing to kill wolves only ensures that this beautiful animal will become extinct. Demand wolves be saved from this horrible fate. We have to act now if we want these awesome animals to be around for years to come.

PETITION LETTER:

Dear Minister Tiilikainen,

Endangered wolves are being slaughtered in your country, even though they are protected by the European Union. It is important that we do everything possible to save this beautiful animal so that they will be able to thrive.

Claiming that wolves have to be shot for the purpose of protecting hunters is a poor argument. Unfortunately, the government has apparently already allowed many wolves to be killed and plans to continue having countrywide hunts take place.

People are hardly ever attacked by wolves. One study even revealed that when wolves were approached, they are most likely to flee instead of act aggressively. The two wolves in the study that did not immediately leave when approached were mothers who only showed protective behavior toward their cubs, rather than aggressive behavior toward the people who approached them.

Continuing to allow wolves to be hunted will only lead to their extinction. We therefore demand that wolves be protected in Finland rather than hunted. If we don’t do what we can to save them today, they may disappear forever.

Sincerely,

[Your Name Here]

From Change.org (www.change.org)

Brigitte Sommer, Germany, 8 Mar 2017

The Wolves in Italy also need your support!

The protection of wolves goes beyond borders

Wolves have been afforded one of the strictest protection measures in Europe; they may not be hunted or killed. Unfortunately not all member states of the European Union adhere to this convention, though. Besides of France and other EU-members, which have created so-called exception rules, wolves in Italy will now also be targeted. The EU already warned Sweden of consequences two years ago, but the bureaucratic mills seem to work slowly.

Back to Italy – although eleven regions of Italy, amongst them the Abruzzi, do not agree with minister Galletti’s plan that makes provision for the killing of certain wolves, he does not want to give up. The fight to stop this plan must continue.

Please help with your signature at:

https://www.change.org/p/soslupo-salviamo-i-lupi-sbonaccini-glgalletti?recruiter=293738677&utm_source=share_petition&utm_medium=facebook&utm_campaign=share_facebook_responsive&utm_term=des-lg-34881-custom_msg

 

Other News

National

From SanWild Wildlife Trust (lizel@sanwild.org)

  1. Nellie still needs our help

As you will all know by now Nellie is ready to come home and the SanWild and Wild Africa teams are doing what we can to ensure that we raise additional funding to pay for Nellie’s capture, transportation, transit insurance, pregnancy care and ongoing veterinary support as well as a rhino habitat suitability report that is a new requirement for releasing rescued rhinos back to the wild to ensure their ongoing wellbeing in Intensive Protection Zones.

We need to raise an additional $12 500.00 US

It is imperative that we find the additional funding needed by no later than Monday the 27th February 2017 to ensure that funds reach us in time to meet our contractual obligations with her current owner.

Please do bear in mind that for funds to reach us in South Africa via the current Generosity Campaign, EFT (Electronic Fund Transfers), direct banking transfer (please email Louise on louise@sanwild.org for banking details) or PayPal does take a couple of days so we need you to act now if you would like to help bring Nellie home.

You ARE DEFINITELY making an enormous contribution to help safeguard these critically endangered animals and we trust you will keep up your support for Nellie.  We are almost there.

You can continue to donate via the Generosity Campaign or use this direct PayPal link

Thanks so much for your understanding, love and support.

International

From Care2 Action Alerts (actionalerts@care2.com)

Peru: They say the dog was disobedient, and that’s why it deserved its fate.

Every year, people in the village of Chalhuani in central Peru choose a local dog that is known for trouble-making and tie it onto the back of a bull. As the dog yelps in fear, they strap all four of its legs onto the bull so that it cannot run and can barely even move. Then, handlers release the bull into the fighting ring and it charges out – with the dog still on its back.

Ask the President of Peru to ban the use of dogs in bullfighting. Sign the petition: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AxF0F/zSk4/GeQa

In 2015, the Peruvian government passed the Animal Protection and Welfare Law, which outlaws the killing, torture or abandonment of pets or wild animals. Any person who disobeys this law can be sentenced to five years in prison. But the law makes an exception for bullfighting because it is considered part of Peru’s cultural heritage.

But tying a panicked dog onto the back of a bull and sending it into the fighting ring is not about culture. It’s cruelty, pure and simple. Once the dogs are in the arena, they will be brutally stabbed, over and over, until they finally die along with the bull.

When Corinne learned about this practice, she was horrified. She started a Care2 petition to end this cruel and grotesque practice, but she needs signatures from all over the world in order to have any chance of succeeding. Sign her petition to show the Peruvian government this tradition is causing an international outcry they cannot ignore: http://www.care2.com/go/z/e/AxF0F/zSk4/GeQa

From Faye Cuevas, International Fund for Animal Welfare (news@ifaw.org)

Half of Africa’s elephants could be gone in 10 years

Butterbean’s mother nudges her awake so they can join their family on their morning walk to the river in Malawi’s Kasungu National Park. At the same time, a band of armed poachers tracks the elephants to the river. They raise their rifles, and take aim at the small herd. What happens next could be up to you.

Butterbean was born recently in Kasungu National Park in Malawi. There used to be 1,000 elephants in Kasungu, but ivory poachers have killed so many that now only 50 remain.

Ivory poaching has become a mass elephant slaughter. An estimated 20,000 were killed just in the last year – that’s an average of one elephant killed every 26 minutes! At that rate, half of Africa’s elephants could be gone in just ten years!

http://links.mkt4012.com/ctt?kn=39&ms=MTY2MTE5NDES1&r=NTUyNjI2NTUyMgS2&b=0&j=OTYxNzE2MjM3S0&mt=1&rt=0

To stop poachers before they strike, we’ve created a groundbreaking project called tenBoma. It can mean the difference between life and death for elephants like Butterbean.

TenBoma is based on an anti-terrorism model used by the military. Information is gathered from local residents, wildlife rangers, police, other non-profits, satellites and other sources.

When the information points to a serious threat to elephants, rangers are sent immediately to intercept the poachers before they can slaughter the elephants.

We’ve already made numerous arrests, but we need your help to expand tenBoma into areas of Africa where elephants are most vulnerable.

You can join our fight to save elephants and other animals from cruelty and suffering here.

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves in the USA

The “War on Wolves Act”

Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming have decided to eradicate wolves.

Senators from Midwest and Wyoming have introduced a bill to strip protections from endangered Gray wolves. The “War on Wolves Act” is a companion bill to legislation introduced last week in the House that would strip federal protections from wolves and allow trophy hunting and trapping of the species in four states.

If the legislation passes both chambers and gets signed by the president, it would hand the fate of wolves in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Wyoming over to states whose management wolf plans two federal courts ruled inadequate to securing the species at legally required population levels in absence of Endangered Species Act protections.

In Wyoming, this would allow the state to resume a hostile management program that allowed for unlimited shoot-on-sight killing of wolves across 85 percent of the state. The legislation would further strip citizens of the right to challenge these lethal programs in court. The appeals process of two federal court decisions that restored federal protections to wolves in those four states are still underway. Decisions on those cases are expected any day.

The following is a statement from Marjorie Mulhall, Senior Legislative Counsel at Earthjustice:

“A new congress has resurfaced an old vendetta against imperiled wolves. If this legislation is signed into law, wolves in Wyoming will be subjected to unregulated killing across the vast majority of the state, and even on the borders of Yellowstone National Park numerous legal loopholes will authorize widespread wolf killing

Americans widely hailed the return of wolves to the Northern Rockies two decades ago as a triumph of the Endangered Species Act, but now this “War on Wolves Act” would allow for the same unregulated killing that nearly wiped out the species in the first place.
Politicians should not meddle in the science-based listing status of a particular species at any stage, but now is an especially bad time as these cases are still playing out in the courts. We urge those who support the protection of wolves to call their senators and representatives and tell them to vote down this lethal legislation.”

Although this could have also been a small note in our news section we have decided to give you the full report from http://nativeamericans24.us/2017/03/minnesota-wisconsin-and-wyoming-have-decided-to-eradicate-wolves/ in this space because if we, the wolf lovers and protectors, do not act now and fast, this will end in the violent death of hundreds of wolves in the US again.

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 136

Don’t Kill The Wolf

by Robert Mosteller

The low murmur of chants
and the slow tempo of the drums,
the Indian braves dance around the fire
as the wolf spirit comes.
The slight bellow of a howl
off in the distance you hear,
the wolf and Indian are brothers
to each, they show no fear.

They respect one another
because they share the same land,
the Indian learns from the wolf
the lessons he keeps at hand.
The wolf is strong and stealth
in his characteristic ways,
his howl lets you know
it is the end of the day.

The wolf was many
as in the days of old,
but now there are few
that stand so bold.
The white man shows fear
so with fear, he kills,
thus, he builds up the land
with all his skills.

The white man doesn’t understand
why the wolf kills,
he too has to survive
with his instincts and skills.
The more man builds the land
the more he takes away,
the wolf has nowhere to go
where is his prey?

His prey is the white man’s
chickens, cattle, or sheep,
he attacks them unexpected
when the white man goes to sleep.
Thus, it has made man mad
when he saw the tracks,
it was a dog like animal
for they ran in packs.

They felt threatened and scared
by the wolves periodic attacks,
they’re surely vicious
when they run in packs.
But whose fault is this
is it man or beast?
We all have to survive
to say the least.

But in order to survive
we all have to share,
by giving of something
and to show you care.
Let’s save the wolf
and respect his needs,
he’s not a real threat
give back, on what he feeds.

There’s a senseless slaughter
going on these days,
of killing wolves and
keeping them at bay.
This can be stopped
but not without your voice,
let’s save the wolves
make the right choice.

 

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Just a short update on Ascar’s progress: Although he seems to forget about “his lesson” from time to time and makes attempts to revert to his old behaviour, we can say that, in general, he is much friendlier towards Kajack now. Sure, he has to demonstrate every few hours every day that he is the big boss, but he goes about it with far less brutality than he used to before, and he now also listens much better to Ted and me when we tell him to be gentle. If all else fails, a short rattling with the chain will be enough to drive the point home. He is still most curious about the chain and leash, and we can put it on him without him panicking in the least. Quite the contrary seems to be true – he seems to regard it as some sort of an umbilical cord that will connect him, and him exclusively, to Ted, which shows in him looking almost “admiringly” at him. Taima also seems to be much happier with more harmony in her pack, although she will still reprimand Ascar from time to time for being too bold and pushy. We are certain that time is on our side here and that he will calm down with age (or at least we hope so).

Will be continued…