Volume 13, Issue 167, September 2018

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 13, Issue 167, September 2018

From the Editor’s Desk

It’s early spring up here on the Highveld – finally. Even though this winter wasn’t as cold as some in earlier years by absolute minimum values, it was unusually persistent. I truly hope we will have seen the last of it!

Another month, another reason to get upset to outright furious about what is going on in the land of the extreme. It seems to be an inbred instinct over there that if a wolf pitches up anywhere, it must be killed. Best, it appears, to kill them all by whatever inhumane means. And while we are at it, we can just as well kill all natural predators, so that we can claim to be the only one left standing. “We” here of course means American. That much for a civilized first-world country.

Along pretty much the same lines, we have selected for this month’s issue an intriguing write-up on how lobbyists try to discredit scientific research by feeding in fake information. F@#& the Facts if there are other interests. Read what we have found for you on Mexican gray wolves.

A very sad poem sums it all up.

500 x 50 – Since the last newsletter went out, we have been talking to several of our friends, and look at this: they all think it is a brilliant idea to sustainably support a really worthwhile cause. Some set up standing orders the very same day! See our note under News: National and check whether R 50 would really harm your budget more than it would make you feel good about donating them every month anew. And if you are still doubtful about the beneficiaries, meet them face to face and those who care for them in Reitz, maybe when you go on holiday this coming crazy season.

Till next month,

Ed.

 

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

Register Now for the 2018 International Wolf Symposium 2018:

Wolves in a Changing World

October 11-14, 2018

Calling all Wolf Biologists, Enthusiasts, Educators and Wildlife Conservationists. Registration is now open for the sixth International Wolf Symposium.

Register now

Location & Lodging:

Minneapolis Marriott Northwest

7025 Northland DR N, Minneapolis, MN 55428

Lodging is available at a reduced rate of $119 + taxes per night. All-suite hotel.

Symposium Fees:

  • Regular registration – $474.00 (June 1, 2018 – August 31, 2018)
  • Late registration – $500.00* (Any time after September 1, 2018)
  • Student registration – $299.00 (High school or college. Member discount does not apply.)

*International Wolf Center members will receive a $50.00 discount. Not a member? Join today!

Registration includes 3 breakfasts, 2 lunches, a reception, all daily break refreshments and materials.

Optional Events:

  • Welcome Rendezvous Reception with cash bar, Thursday 7:00 – 9:00 p.m., October 11, 2018
  • Wolves and Wilderness Bus Tour, Thursday, October 11, 2018 – $99 (Bus tour will not be back in time for the reception.)
  • The Last Great Wolf Restoration Banquet, Saturday evening, October 13, 2018 – $50

*If your employer will not cover these expenses or you are bringing a significant other, click here to register for the additional events separately.

Program:

Keynote speakers and Plenary sessions will be presented by international wolf experts in their particular fields of study.

Concurrent sessions, given throughout the day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, will focus on a variety of topics under the following categories:

  • Distribution of Wolves Around the World
  • Wolf Ecology
  • Wolf/Human Interactions
  • Wolf Management and Policies
  • Wildlands and Ecosystems
  • Wolf Conservation and Education
  • Emerging Research and Technologies
  • Other

Poster Session: Posters will be on display Friday through noon Sunday, with a Q&A session Saturday at noon.

Exhibitors will have displays throughout the symposium.

Networking opportunities will be plentiful.

Be sure to watch your email and wolf.org for updates! You can help us spread the word by sharing this email.

Learn more at here

  1. International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs  here

  1. Upcoming Webinars 

Webinar rate: $15 Non-members, $12 Members

 

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

It may be cold outside, but it’s time to start thinking about summer camp!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long!  The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12.  All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration HERE

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration here

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone here

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (Frans Badenhorst, wolfrescuesa@gmail.com)

Extracts from the HuskyRomi Newsletter August 2018

From the Sanctuary

Life out here is pretty much the same as last month, the Isuzu is still not mechanically sound, but there is not much we can do about it, we just manage to keep it running. We have increased the size of the geriatrics enclosure. We have also removed all the electric fencing so that the oldtimers don’t get shocked by mistake.

Volunteer Program

This is in its final stages of completion. Kim has put a lot of effort into getting the room ready and we will be able to sleep four people down at the house. Thanks to Mandy Marshall for all the wonderful stuff that she brought down to help kickstart the project. A new toilet, paint for the bathroom and for the burglar bars and numerous other things.

Kim has bought a ton of linen for all the beds. It’s just so overwhelming with everything that is happening out here.

Frans’ Ramblings

As most of you know, I live with my wife, daughter, a Rottweiler and two wolves. I have the habit to take the rottie (Titus) and the wolves (Yiska and Wahya) for a walk in the neighbourhood almost every day that I can fit it into my schedule and because it is important to me, I literally make time to do it.

This morning while walking with Yiska (four year old Canadian Timber Wolf), I started thinking again about the Pretoria security company that acquired a number of wolves to train and use as security animals. I can only imagine what a disaster this will be and what would happen to the poor non co-operative wolves being forced into a working situation that they do not know how to comply to. Wolves are not dogs, and especially not guard dogs. Even Yiska and Wahya know that Titus is the one with the job portfolio of “guarding”. They will gladly retire into the living room watching through the window while he gives some possible threat walking past the gate a piece of his mind. Wahya (three year old Russian Tundra Wolf) is very territorial and plain scared and shy, especially of anybody and anything strange, even though he is a huge block of a canid. He easily retires to one of his personal “safe spots” in and around the house and we know where to look for him when he disappears.

Can you imagine animals with that type of independent personalities being forced into doing guard duty? When we actively started doing wolf rescues in 2014, two of the first re-homing’s we did were Ghost and Shadow, a brother and sister that were used as guard wolves at a powder coating paint yard on the East Rand. Apparently Ghost turned on and pinned down his handler one day and that was when we were called to please remove them. On your next visit to HuskyRomi, please ask Larry to point them out to you, go into the enclosure and experience this for yourself. He probably just did not want to do what the handler wanted him to do and resisted by pinning him down — nonsense. When I go for my walks with the animals, I have a couple of different routes around the neighbourhood that I usually follow, but I mostly allow the animal that I take out to choose for himself which way he feels inclined to walk on that specific day and then I just basically walk along. It is interesting how they choose a different route almost daily and very often also decide that they want to turn around rather than completing the course. I have learned the hard way that it is totally senseless to try and drag them along if they actually had enough and want to go home. That is their nature and how I allow them to live and I believe that they are happy and contented animals.

I do know of trained wolves being used as guide dogs, but I believe it is a very different situation to being used for guarding. All this said, I however also believe that if they should experience a direct threat to themselves or their pack (which would in our situation be us), they will stand their ground and protect as required, just like I would do it.

Throw your heads back and keep howling.

Frans.

News from the Shire

There are still a few pages left for sponsorship in the 2019 calendar. They will be the same format as this year, A3 hanging wall calendar with 13/14 pages. Even as a NPO we unfortunately don’t get printing for free so we are looking for sponsors or donations to help. You can sponsor a page for R500. For that you will receive a calendar for free as well as your logo or message printed on the page you sponsor. If you would like to donate or sponsor, please send a message to Nolia Meyer on FB, email nolia@pentasure.ws or whatsapp 0726221764. We plan to have the calendars ready by end of October.

Please also consider if you want to order five or more calendars, to put your order in now so that we can have it printed in one batch. We are only ordering a limited amount. The calendars will cost R120, discount on bulk orders.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly newsletter, mail Frans Badenhorst at wolfrescuesa@gmail.com and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

 

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (http://www.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Add your name: Help stop the cruel killing of wolf pups and bear cubs

Another outrage from the Trump Administration – and if we don’t act fast wolves and bears, including pups and cubs, could die.

Take action: Tell the Trump Administration you oppose brutal killing methods in national preserves: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=wofWPGF1K54mMqHbs7er9A

Here’s what’s going on:

The National Park Service (NPS) has proposed lifting a ban on extreme killing methods on Park Service lands in Alaska. If the ban is removed, wolves, bears and other predators will be vulnerable to appalling and cruel killing methods that most people oppose.

The state of Alaska has made no secret of its intentions – they want to aggressively kill predators to artificially inflate populations of moose, caribou and other game animals.

Please take action to help imperilled wildlife: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=BCcFJUsqHmpK_PxhRgaUGg

If the Park Service follows through on its plan, it will be legal to kill wolves and pups and mother bears and their cubs in their dens. It will be legal to bait bears with donuts and garbage and shoot them when they come sniffing for it. It could even be legal to shoot caribou from motor boats while the animals are crossing rivers.

This is unacceptable – please call on NPS to protect bears and wolves in Alaska from extreme killing methods: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Gdyx9LRffIImWiqWjHlwsA

If the current proposal becomes final, the floodgates could open to a despicable wave of killing and death that shouldn’t happen anywhere, and especially not on America’s park lands.

Elke, your voice matters. If you love wildlife like I think you do, please take this action right now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=09-7e28hexukGVIEnvn5kg

Thanks for all you do.

  1. USA: These wolves don’t need to die

This young pack doesn’t even have a name – but just yesterday – the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) authorized the lethal removal of two wolves from this northeastern Washington pack.

Tell the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Director to rescind this decision to kill these wolves NOW: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=XT_6hoAOSZvjqzpOfKGv8w

While the decision to execute these animals comes in the wake of a handful of attacks by wolves on livestock, there are a number of proven nonlethal strategies that ranchers can use to adapt their operations to prevent or eliminate wolf attacks on livestock.

Please take immediate action: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=TtWjRInewb2Ve8rYHALfLg

This ‘kill first, ask questions later’ approach is not only senseless, it’s also ineffective. This specific area of eastern Washington has been the site of repeated wolf-livestock conflicts, and instead of requiring the rancher to adapt their practices to allow for coexistence, WDFW is allowing wolves to be killed off – this cannot continue!

Demand that the Washington Fish and Wildlife Director Kelly Susewind reverse this decision to kill wolves in this brand-new pack TODAY!

http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=8PGl2c_nMI4W-hofuNnX5Q

These wolves don’t have to die. Defenders is on the ground in Washington state implementing non-lethal control measures with proven results in protecting livestock and saving wolves. This new pack demonstrates that wolves are still regaining a foothold in Washington State. By killing them, the state is acting prematurely and the death of these wolves will not solve the problem.

Please take action today to save these wolves here

 

From Change.org (Brigitte Sommer (www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de) via Change.org (change@mail.change.org, translated here from German)

Wolfsschutz Deutschland on Facebook here

Germany: Wolf News – always up-to-date and free!

Surveys have shown repeatedly that most people in Germany, Austria and Denmark are pro-wolf, but one lobby, consisting of livestock farmers who don’t want to protect, farmers associations and hunters, leave nothing untried to change public opinion, partly even with lies, and with the help of the media.

With our blog we have created an antipole. We offer the latest information about the wolf, unmask fake stories, and inspect the fences of livestock farmers who claim theirs to be safe, which in the most cases is not the case. They even provoke killings to underline their demand to shoot wolves. To counteract such practices information is needed that the media often don’t publish or even omit from their articles.

You can easily subscribe to our blog at www.wolfsschutz-deutschland.de; scroll down on the right side and click on BLOG VIA E-MAIL ABONNIEREN. Fill in your email address and you will never again miss out on news.

  1. Please also help the wolves in Austria and sign this petition

Wolves in Austria are under pressure. They are supposed to be shot even before they had a chance of establishing themselves properly.

And that although the majority of people in Austria, like in Germany, are PRO wolf. There was an anti-wolf petition that was signed by about 3000 people. Let’s show friends of the wolves that we are the majority and please sign the petition here

 

From News by the California Wolf Center Mexican Wolf (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

MEXICAN WOLF UPDATE July 1-31, 2018

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project) activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico.  Additional Project information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at www.azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf.   For information on the FAIR, call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit www.wmatoutdoor.org.

Past updates may be viewed at these websites.  Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose.  The Project is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to:  the Alpine wolf office (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653.  For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 338-4385 ext. 226.  To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Updates

On July 12 and 13, the annual meeting of the Mexican Wolf Species Survival Plan (SSP) was hosted by the Brookfield Zoo in Illinois.  The SSP oversees management of the Mexican wolf captive breeding program for the USFWS and meets annually with the primary purpose to discuss population demographics, management and research needs, as well as to make breeding and transfer recommendations for the upcoming year.  The meeting was attended by USFWS, AZGFD and representatives from captive breeding facilities from the United States and Mexico. The next SSP meeting will be held in Mexico during summer of 2019.

On July 18, the USFWS advertised the job announcement for the Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator position.  The application period closed on August 2, 2018.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history.  Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months.  A lowercase letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicates breeding wolves.

Definitions:  A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an established territory.  In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status.  The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars.  The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The year-end minimum population count for 2017 was 114 wolves in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico.  Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as mortality is particularly high on young pups).  Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year.  Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year that accounts for most mortality and survival of young pups.  At the end of July, there were 71 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring.

IN ARIZONA:

Bear Wallow Pack (collared AM1338, M1676, and f1683)

In July, the IFT documented the Bear Wallow Pack in their territory on the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF) and occasionally on the SCAR.  Yearling f1683, M1676, and AM1338 were documented travelling separately. Male1676 made dispersal movements across the central and western portion of the ASNF and on the Coconino National Forest.

Bluestem Pack (collared f1686)

In July, the IFT documented the Bluestem Pack in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  Yearling f1686 made dispersal movements from the pack’s territory this month within the eastern portion of the ASNF.

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In July, M1477 continued to be documented with an uncollared wolf.  The pair has been holding a territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, f1668, and m1671)

In July, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, m1666, m1677, and m1681)

In July, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the pack to reduce potential for conflict. The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Panther Creek Pack (collared AM1382)

In July, the IFT documented AM1382 travelling alone in the pack’s traditional territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Pine Spring Pack (collared F1562 and AM1394)

In July, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF.  The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared F1488 and M1471)

In July, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF.  F1488 and M1471 exhibited behavior and movements consistent with pup rearing. The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for this pack in a proactive attempt to reduce the potential for human-wildlife interactions near residences.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, m1661, and m1680)

In July, the Saffel Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.  The pack displayed localized behaviour consistent with pup rearing during the month of July.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In July, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1489

In July, the IFT documented F1489 travelling in the north and east central portion of the ASNF and in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Single collared M1574

In July, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF, the SCAR, and the eastern portion of the FAIR.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347, F1560, and m1672)

In July, the Baldy Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the north central portion of the ASNF.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291)

In July, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory both on the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared AM1343, AF1283, and f1674)

In July, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion the FAIR.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared M1559 and F1679)

In July, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Copper Creek Pack

During July, the Copper Creek Pack was not located.  Currently there are no functioning collars in this pack.

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AF1456 and AM1354)

During July, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF).  The Dark Canyon Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared M1453 and F1685)

During July, the Datil Mountain Pack continued to travel in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF).

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443 and AM1447)

In July, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona.  The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.  The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Hawks Nest Pack (collared AM1038 and F1473)

During July, the Hawks Nest Pack began travelling separately.  Alpha male 1038 continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF, while F1437 has consistently been located with its natal pack (Elk Horn) in Arizona.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, m1555, m1556, and f1670)

During July, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF.  The Iron Creek Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Lava Pack (collared AF1405 and AM1285)

During July, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF.  The IFT discontinued the supplemental food cache. The Lava Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with rearing pups during July.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

During July, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and fp1684)

During July, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The Luna Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during July.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, f1664 and f1705)

During July, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The Mangas Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during July.

Prieto Pack (collared AF1251, AM1398, F1565, m1669, and m1678)

During July, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack and implemented continuous hazing efforts to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The Prieto Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with denning within their traditional territory during July.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1578)

During July, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  The IFT maintained a diversionary food cache for the San Mateo Pack to reduce potential for livestock conflict.  The San Mateo Pack continued to display behaviour consistent with rearing pups during July.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

During July AF1553, of the SBP Pack and single M1561 continued to use the traditional territory of the SBP pack in the north central portion of the GNF.  The wolves continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with rearing pups.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788)

In July the IFT documented an uncollared male wolf travelling with F1788.  The IFT has continued efforts to determine reproductive status of this pack and to reduce potential for further conflict with cattle by maintaining a diversionary food cache and conducting intensive hazing efforts.

Single collared M1486

During July, M1486 travelled throughout the northern and central portions of the CNF.

Single collared M1561

During July, M1561 has been travelling and rearing pups with AF1553 of the Sheepherder’s Baseball Park Pack.

Single collared M1673

During July, M1673 travelled throughout the southern portion of the GNF, largely within the Dark Canyon Pack territory.

MORTALITIES

There were no mortalities documented in July.  From January 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018 there have been a total of 6 documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of July, there were 7 confirmed wolf depredation incidents on livestock.  There was one nuisance incident during July. From January 1, 2018 to July 31, 2018 there have been a total of 55 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 23 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On July 1, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow and calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow and calf were killed by a bear.

On July 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 4, a horseback range rider working cattle on the ASNF south of Greer had between 4 to 5 wolves approach to within 30 to 40 yards of the range rider and his dogs.  The rider stated the wolves’ attention was focused on his dogs that were barking at cattle. The rider made aggressive movements toward the wolves and yelled which caused the wolves to immediately retreat out of sight.  The wolves were not seen again by the rider. After the incident occurred the rider called and reported the event to the IFT.

On July 7, Wildlife Services investigated an injured calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a probable wolf injury.

On July 7, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 9, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 11, Wildlife Services investigated two dead cows in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined both cows were killed by a bear.

On July 15, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, NM.  The investigation concluded the calf had died from unknown causes.

On July 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a probable wolf kill.

On July 17, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 18, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM.  The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf kill.

On July 19, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf had been killed by a bear.

On July 20, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ.  The investigation determined the calf had been killed by coyotes.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On July 10 through July 12, the IFT completed bi-annual helicopter training.

On July 11, the USFWS participated in an SSP Management Group meeting in Brookfield, Illinois.

On July 17, WMAT presented to Turkey Creek Livestock Association in East Fork, AZ.

On July 18, WMAT presented to BIA Forestry in Whiteriver, AZ.

On July 27, WMAT presented to the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project at Big Lake Recreation Area, AZ.

On July 28, AZGFD personnel presented to the Grand Canyon Wolf Recovery Project at Big Lake Recreation Area, AZ.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In July, Craig Zurek left the IFT to continue his professional career.  Thank you Craig for your dedication and contribution to Mexican wolf recovery.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves.  A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263.  Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

 

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail10.atl261.mcdlv.net) on behalf of; Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Federal Plan Poised to Allow Landowners to Kill Endangered Red Wolves

Another chance to take action – USFWS has re-opened their public comment period!

On June 28, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced its proposal that could result with the extinction of the last wild red wolves. Today, fewer than 30 wolves remain in the wild.

Beyond reducing the red wolf recovery area by nearly 90% and limiting the wild population to just 10-15 wolves, USFWS, the very agency charged by federal law with protecting endangered species, will allow landowners to kill red wolves who stray beyond the newly-designated recovery area – and without any repercussions.

The good news is that USFWS has re-opened their public comment period, so if you didn’t have an opportunity to comment before the July 30th deadline, now is your chance to take action!

Take Action and join the thousands of people speaking up for endangered red wolves before the August 28 deadline. You can find the link to submit comments and talking points here.

No species should face extinction at the hands of humanity, much less twice.

Take action here: https://nywolf.org/support-us/red-wolf-proposed-10j-rule-take-action

  1. USA: Budget Rider Seeks to Remove Federal Protections From Gray Wolves Nationwide

Damaging anti-wildlife amendments (riders) that undermine Endangered Species Act (ESA) are still in play for the House FY 2019 Interior/EPA appropriations bill. One provision goes as far as to remove protection for gray wolves nationwide. Section 117 legislatively removes federal protections for all gray wolves in the lower 48 states except the critically endangered Mexican gray wolf.

If anti-wolf legislation is passed into law, wolves will die at the hands of trophy hunters.

Please help.

Please urge the leading members of the U.S. House and Senate to reject all policy riders in appropriations bills that would undermine the Endangered Species Act, including H.R. 6147 anti-wolf provision in section 117.

Take action here:

http://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51421/p/dia/action4/common/public/?action_KEY=25433

 

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

Nothing to report

International

From Salty Dog via Change.org (change@mail.change.org)

  1. USA: US Secretary Zinke promotes Hunting by blending its Stats with Wildlife Watchers (Petition update)

7 Sep 2018 — Today Secretary Zinke promoted hunting/fishing by misleadingly blending its stats with wildlife watchers, a group he at best ignores and often attacks. He has done this many times. He said that 40% of Americans 16 and older pursue an outdoor activity like hunting, fishing and birding. Bringing in an economic activity of $156 billion.

The truth is 5% are hunting, the rest, 35% are bird watching, etc.

Zinke is a deliberate liar. Much like his boss.

Please, if you haven’t done so already, sign the petition here

 

Wolves and Wolfdogs

  • New research finds Mexican gray wolves aren’t part dog after all

From 1977 to 1980, Roy McBride combed pine and oak forests high in the Sierra Madre Occidental range of northern Mexico, searching for the last remaining wild Mexican gray wolves.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wanted to breed more endangered Mexican gray wolves in captivity to save them from extinction. Eradication campaigns had eliminated them from the wild in the United States, so the agency hired McBride to capture wolves across the border.

McBride caught three of the seven wolves on whose DNA the fate of the entire Mexican gray wolf subspecies would depend. But he was shocked when he saw some of the other founding wolves in the captive breeding program. They looked like dogs to him.

Anecdotal accounts of genetic impurities among these seven founders have long been a cannon for arguments against recovering this Gray wolf subspecies. A contaminated bloodline could undermine efforts to restore the wolf to its historical habitat.

Fish and Wildlife Service officials have rejected the accusations, but new research into the Mexican gray wolf bloodline found what advocates say is ample evidence to support findings that the bloodline is pure.

A University of Arizona study examined the DNA of decedents from each lineage the seven founding wolves created.

Since the 1980s, the captive breeding program, an international effort between the United States and Mexico, has grown to around 250 wolves.

At least 114 wolves roamed wild in Arizona and New Mexico at the time of the latest annual survey. And in February, Mexican officials reported 37 wild wolves south of the border.

The recovery program’s opponents have argued that Mexican gray wolves already went extinct, accusing program managers of raising a wolf bloodline contaminated by dogs or coyotes.

But the University of Arizona study found no evidence that any of the founding wolves were wolf-dog hybrids or that dogs had recently hybridized with Mexican gray wolves.

They analyzed 87 Mexican gray wolves, comparing DNA samples to that of dogs and other gray wolves.

It’s still an open question if wolves have interbred with coyotes and to what extent, but genetic work by the Fish and Wildlife Service suggests they have not.

Their research could have dealt a blow to the recovery program if it had found wolf-dog hybridization.

McBride warned that questions of impurities would always haunt the Mexican gray wolf bloodline.

Recovery program officials have tried to dispel this misperception, but it’s been around since recovery efforts started and repeatedly comes up at public meetings. In 2006, a rancher and a Catron County employee in New Mexico suspected that two animals the rancher had killed were wolf-dog hybrids.

The county employee said he gave blood and tissue samples from the animals to a biologist at the recovery program to test, the investigators noted. But county commissioners later accused the Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Project of destroying the samples.

This accusation and more against the recovery project sparked the investigation by the department’s Office of Inspector General. Among their other claims, the Catron County commissioners more broadly alleged that Mexican Gray wolves had severely interbred with dogs or coyotes.

Apache County also passed an ordinance in 2013 that questioned the legality of releasing Mexican gray wolves in light of the county’s suspicion that the subspecies was really a “wolf-dog hybrid.”

It has happened in the past, but the pups were euthanized in their den, and the recovery program tests every wolf and coyote they catch for genetic purity.

Beyond disproving wolf-dog hybridization, researchers found that Mexican gray wolves’ genetic variety is deteriorating, which could limit their ability to evolve and adapt to their environment.

In general this loss of variation makes Mexican Gray wolves much more susceptible to things in the future, like disease.

Genetic issues, like “loss of adaptive potential,” are a top threat to these wolves. The plan aims to increase gene diversity by releasing more captive wolves into the wild and moving wild wolves around on the landscape to breed.

Mexican gray wolves will remain on the endangered species list until officials release 22 in the U.S. and 37 in Mexico that survive to reach breeding age at 2 years old. Wolf populations must also average 320 in the United States and 200 in Mexico over eight years.

The study’s main findings — that wolves are not hybridized with dogs — are important, but the decline in genetic variety is very concerning.

Excerpt from the original article by Alex Devoid at

You can follow the azcentral and Arizona Republic environmental reporting team at OurGrandAZ on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 153

Finally Sleeping by Megan K McConnell

Eight pups in the pack,
all so innocent,
all so quaint.
Each travelling home for the frigid cold to come,
not a care in the world,
not a worry in their thoughts,
Till the winter traffic began to roar.

The adults went first,
the pups went next,
that’s when the pain full scream cried out.
His bloody paws,
his shallow breath,
drawn with pain at every attempt.

His wails are weakening,
his cries are piercing,
his strength is dying,
his heart is stopping.

His one last breath is drawn deeply,
his deep blue eyes are finally Sleeping.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

By Erin

Nothing new to report this month

Will be continued…