Volume 14, Issue 176, June-July 2019

SAFHOWL

The Monthly Free E-Newsletter of South African Friends of Wolves

Volume 14, Issue 176, June-July 2019

From the Editor’s Desk

Did anybody notice? There was no SAFHOWL in June.

I have a new archenemy: The ministerial bitch that has given in to the anti-wolf lobbyists in Germany and will soon have gunslingers fire away at them – on the mere suspicion that a wolf or an entire pack of wolves might be responsible for a negligent farmer losing some sheep or other livestock. Yeah, sure, why burden those poor farmers with setting up proper fencing or bothering with guard dogs? And why taking the pains of eventually starting to educate the public that wolves eat little red-hooded girls only in the Grimms’ horror stories? She obviously looked to the US and copied their anti-nature example. When will people finally start realizing that nothing good ever comes out of this country?

Speaking of which: the delisting drama that is currently going on in the US really befits the most dangerous man on Earth. Yes, the one who reigns on Twitter, not the one with the turban or the one with the good haircut. Our News section below is full of it, and the details are nothing short of shocking.

Our Wolves and Wolfdogs section this time contains something that Erin and I have had the opportunity to observe first hand, several times: How wolves grieve when they lose a pack member. It is very, very touching and emotional.

A short wolf tale sums up who the monster really is, and Erin provides a summary of what’s been happing here on the cold Highveld over the past few weeks.

Till the next newsletter,

Ed.

Upcoming Events

International Wolf Center (info@wolf.ccsend.com); on behalf of International Wolf Center (info@wolf.org)

International Wolf Center’s Adventure Programs

Say Yes to New Adventures!

Turn your vacation into a one-of-a-kind wilderness experience. The International Wolf Center offers a variety of Adventure Programs led by informative and enthusiastic wolf experts for people of all ages. Visit our website for a complete list of adventure programs here

Wolf Conservation Center (contact=nywolf.org@mail63.sea91.rsgsv.net)

1. Wolf Camp for Kids!

Give the young animal lover in your family a chance to thrive among wolves all week long! The five-day program will include opportunities for your child to learn about nature and wildlife through woodland exploration, scavenger hunts, wilderness games, live animals, etc. Children will learn about various habitats, animal communication and behaviour, food chains, and local wildlife.

Programs will run with a minimum of 4 children and a maximum of 12. All children who complete the program will get a special “Junior Wolf Biologist” certificate. Pre-registration is required.
SUMMER SESSIONS
Time: 
9AM – 3PM
Fee: $350 per child for the week-long program (Monday – Friday)

Information & registration here: https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=2971075dd4&e=c4f881378d

2. Sleeping with Wolves – Our Wild Campout Adventure

Wake up with Wolves!

Sleeping with Wolves, the Wolf Conservation Center‘s popular nocturnal adventure experience gives guests a chance to camp out overnight with the 30 wolves that call the centre home! With all the howls and nature’s night-time chatter, you will feel like you’re camping under the stars with wild wolves!
Pre-registration is required. Space is limited and dates are selling out quickly!

Information and registration: https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=d1c0d9f9d6&e=c4f881378d

  1. Join Us for an Adventure in Yellowstone (https://nywolf.us8.list-manage.com/track/click?u=96aae4d71726eb91ae4d20fec&id=f466f0759e&e=c4f881378d)

The Wild is Calling!

Join us for an adventure sure to impart wild memories!
Join professionals from Yellowstone Insight and the Wolf Conservation Center for unique, educational, and wildlife-filled adventures in Yellowstone National Park!
Have you ever wanted to go to Yellowstone? Bask in the natural wonders of the first National Park? If so, one of these adventures is perfect!

News from the Wolf Front

National

From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary (committee@huskyromi.co.za)

HuskyRomi Newletter May 2019

Sanctuary Update

We are currently facing a few challenges and would like to point out a few things we are in need of. Should you know of anyone who can assist or if you could help us to locate items on the wish list we would be very grateful.

Lavender/ Herb Bushes

The sanctuary is currently looking into alternative ways to incorporate in the fly and pests prevention plan already in place. Due to the heavy rains experienced recently we would like to incorporate these ASAP to improve the living conditions for the fur babies. Yes, we are looking for Lavender bushes or any other herb such as Rosemary that keeps away flies.

Our plan is to plant these bushes and shrubs in between the enclosures that will not only form a barrier between the packs; however they will be aesthetically pleasing to visitors as well as have the added benefit to assist with fly and natural pest’s issues.

So if you are visiting a local nursery please remember to include a lavender or rosemary bush to your trolley; there are many ways in which we can get these to the sanctuary.

Contact Larry at larry@huskyromi.co.za and we can make an arrangement to get these valuable plants to the sanctuary.

Wish list

We are looking for a nice solid wooden door for the rondavel, even second hand will do.

I would like to put a chesterfield in the rondavel for people to sit on and relax after a

tour and enjoy some refreshments.

Jaffel irons, maybe you bought one in the past but never use it/them, let us give them a second chance.

Again please contact Larry at larry@huskyromi.co.za to organize that these items get to the sanctuary.

HuskyRomi Newsletter June 2019

Sanctuary Update

This month has been a very interesting and busy month at HuskyRomi, from freezing cold weather sometimes reaching -4 Degrees and lower, to interesting emergencies we have been through it all this month. Leaving us with so much to discuss and so little time.

As an update the rondavel is coming along nicely with the roof nearly completed, we are looking at making this a really lovely place for visitors to enjoy more information about the wolves and huskies.

We are still looking for assistance in many different areas to complete the growing “TO DO” list. HuskyRomi offers a wonderful volunteer program that is designed to assist people to get to know more about the wolves and huskies as they spend time with engaging with them as well as the added bonus of assisting to get the little smaller jobs that need doing done.

This is a call to all of you out there, thank you for all you already do for the sanctuary we and the animals greatly appreciate your support.

Should you feel you could possibly be doing something more please contact Larry and find out about spending your next weekend away at the sanctuary getting to know the wonderful animals and making their home safer, prettier and more cozy.

We have lots of odd jobs that need to be completed. If you consider yourself a bit of a do it yourselfer and or have some skills with tools or paintbrushes… come on why not make an adventure from your next holiday…

Show Support for HuskyRomi, it’s Easy…

HuskRomi has merchandise for sale, should you wish to purchase any items please contact us on larry@huskyromi.co.za to place your order.

We are halfway through the year and will accept a reasonable donation and you can have the calendar for free.

Check out the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary’s Facebook page for more information here: https://web.facebook.com/huskyromi/?rdc=1&rdr . If you wish to subscribe to HuskyRomi’s monthly illustrated newsletter, mail larry@huskyromi.co.za or committee@huskyromi.co.za and have yourself added to the mailing list. It’s FREE!

  1. From the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

HuskyRomi’s Volunteer Programme

Ever dreamt of working hands-on with wolves?

Here is an opportunity of a lifetime!

Phone or mail for all the necessary information and request an application form

Larry Paul – 0027 71 679 5141

E-mail: Larry@HuskyRomi.co.za or Committee@Huskyromi.co.za

Note that this offer is available to volunteers from all over the globe!

Why not combine volunteer work with an exotic holiday?

Our GPS coordinates are:

27.776026, 28.442818 or S 27°46’33,5’’, E 028°26’34,0’’

From South African Friends of Wolves (www.safow.org)

500 x 50 – Calling on all South African Friends of Wolves

Set up a standing order with your bank and donate Rand 50 every month to support the wolves, wolfdogs and huskies at the HuskyRomi Wolf Sanctuary

Banking details:

HuskyRomi Rescue and Wolf Sanctuary

First National Bank

Account: 62296463989

Branch: 230833

Type: Cheque Acc

Ref: Donation / Your name

…and then get one of your friends to do the same.

Remember, it’s tax-deductible, sustainable, no Rand is wasted, …and it really feels good to support a worthy cause!

International

From Defenders of Wildlife (defenders@mail.defenders.org)

  1. USA: Wolves need your help

If you think stripping Grey wolves of protections under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) might not be a disaster, think again.

Recent findings clearly show that when wolves are delisted, a lot more of them die.

We can fight this delisting – but we need your help.

We’re fighting a war to save gray wolves on two fronts, in Washington, D.C. and out in wolf country. Your emergency donation helps keep up the fight: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=Nq0-aNOk0wiADkr_apBnmw

In Wyoming, where wolves were delisted in 2017, recent numbers show an increase in wolf kills in the years since the delisting. In 2018, 90% of known wolf mortality was caused by humans. Hunters and state sanctioned lethal control efforts killed 159 wolves. In most of the state, you don’t even need a permit to kill wolves.

In wolf-hostile Idaho, the state refuses to release accurate data. But all evidence points to more wolf deaths since Congress stripped Idaho wolves of federal protections.

Aerial gunning of whole packs, bounties on wolves, 365 day a year killing, cruel snares and traps, up to 20 dead wolves allowed per hunter/trapper each year, and no limits on shooting nursing mothers and pups all mean one thing: when wolves are left to the mercy of hostile states, they die.

Just imagine what could happen if wolves lose ESA protection in the rest of the lower 48!

With your urgent support, Defenders has the experience and track record to protect wolves and other vulnerable animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=uECoyNGYxh4zsnI3e2Jn6Q

Your donation makes you a valued protector of wolves by supporting:

If you think stripping Grey wolves of protections under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) might not be a disaster, think again.

Recent findings clearly show that when wolves are delisted, a lot more of them die.

We can fight this delisting – but we need your help.

We’re fighting a war to save Grey wolves on two fronts, in Washington, D.C. and out in wolf country. Your emergency donation helps keep up the fight.

With your urgent support, Defenders has the experience and track record to protect wolves and other vulnerable animals: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=uECoyNGYxh4zsnI3e2Jn6Q

Your donation makes you a valued protector of wolves by supporting:

A legal team that regularly goes to court for wildlife and has a proven track record of winning when the government won’t do its job;

Smart policy ideas aimed at statehouses and at Congress; and

Advocates and organizers who are getting the word out to the public about imperiled animals and what actions we can take to help.

The miracle of western wolf recovery began in 1995, but if we don’t act now we could see it fail. These wolves desperately need dedicated wildlife lovers like you, demanding their protection and drowning out the wolf haters and the ideologues.

Please, donate today, while you can still make a difference: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=vv03uV01LIMNq-gODX1SIg

  1. USA: Which animal would you miss most?

Which animal would you miss the most?

I’ve been asking myself that same question ever since the recent United Nations report confirmed our worst fears: up to a million species are facing extinction – some within the next decade – unless we take immediate action to save them: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=VzGJbGRddOOqQoQ7_f-SzA

It’s painful to imagine a world where Grey wolves have been hunted to extinction, the remainder of the southern resident Orcas have starved to death, or the last of the polar bears simply couldn’t keep up with the rapidly changing climate.

Wildlife needs your help. Support critical lifesaving conservation efforts today!

The truth is, vulnerable wildlife – and our very planet – are in an unprecedented crisis. For many of these species, the only thing standing between them and extinction is the passion and dedication of wildlife lovers like you. Give to save wildlife: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=oVAVXu3yCaei5eSGGZlZhQ

It’s not too late to fight back: Our team of legal experts, biologists, policy advocates and more are working right now in communities across the country to protect wildlife wherever they’re threatened.

Defenders has been successfully helping species return from the brink of extinction for decades – but we need your help to keep winning for wildlife.

You can be a part of the solution for endangered species: Support efforts to protect the wild right now: http://action.defenders.org/site/R?i=bYPFEVUq5J1kAAPTMSRKqQ

Whether we’re challenging anti-wolf groups, Big Oil, corporate lobbyists, administration officials or other anti-wildlife forces, your support makes wildlife safer in the face of non-stop assaults on their lives and habitat.

Do you know which animal you’d miss the most? With your help, we may never have to answer that terrible question.

Please join us today and help change the future for so many species here

From Leda Huta, Endangered Species Coalition [action@endangered.org]

Your email to keep gray wolves protected from hunting and trapping

Gray wolves have barely begun to recover, yet the Trump Administration is proposing allowing states to manage them as they see fit. This would likely lead to wolf hunting and trapping seasons in areas where these maligned animals are now protected. More than 3,500 wolves have been killed in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming following the removal of Endangered Species Act protections.

The public comment period on this proposal runs through July 15th. I’m emailing you today because are records indicate you have not yet submitted a comment here

Please speak out today in support of the continued protection of gray wolves under the Endangered Species Act.

From Wolf Conservation Center (contact@nywolf.org)

  1. USA: Federal Proposal Threatens to Open Trophy Hunting Seasons on Wolves

Oppose USFWS Nationwide Delisting Proposal

On March 15, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) officially proposed removing federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections for nearly all gray wolves across the lower 48 states, a plan that would allow trophy hunting to immediately resume in three states and put the future of the gray wolf and its proven benefits to ecosystems at serious risk.

Delisting wolves has deadly consequences.

History tells us that under the states’ authority to manage wolf populations, wolves die at the hands of trophy hunters. Since 2011, nearly 3,500 wolves have been killed in states where wolves are unprotected.

Moreover, a majority of the scientists tasked with leading a scientific peer review of the proposed rule found that it failed to follow the best available science. They concluded in the 245-page report that the proposal has numerous factual errors and other problems too.

The proposed rule can be found here: https://engage.nywolf.org/site/R?i=WR0vpbaxB7acEhftTTEjBw in the Federal Register, and the public comment period remains open through July 15, 2019.

If federal protections are removed nationwide, more wolves will be trapped and shot.

We’re not going to allow that happen without a fight. Take action now here

Gray Wolves Needs Your Voice!

From the California Wolf Center (californiawolfcenter@yahoogroups.com on behalf of; erin@californiawolfcenter.org [californiawolfcenter] [californiawolfcenter-noreply@yahoogroups.com)

  1. USA: Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, Monthly Update – May 1-31, 2019

The following is a summary of Mexican Wolf Reintroduction Project (Project)

activities in the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area (MWEPA) in Arizona, including the Fort Apache Indian Reservation (FAIR), San Carlos Apache Reservation (SCAR), and New Mexico. Additional program information can be obtained by calling (928) 339-4329 or toll free at (888) 459-9653, or by visiting the Arizona Game and Fish Department website at

azgfd.gov/wolf or by visiting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website at www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf . For information on the FAIR call (928) 338-4385 ext. 226 or visit wmatoutdoors.org.

Past updates may be viewed on these websites. Interested parties may sign up to receive this update electronically by visiting www.azgfd.com  and clicking on the E-news Signup tab on the top left corner of the webpage.

This update is a public document and information in it can be used for any purpose. The Mexican Wolf Recovery Program is a multi-agency cooperative effort among the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), USDA-Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services (USDA-APHIS WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the White Mountain Apache Tribe (WMAT).

To view semi-monthly wolf location information please visit http://arcg.is/0iGSGH .

Please report any wolf sightings or suspected livestock depredations to: the Alpine wolf office at (928) 339-4329, Pinetop wolf office at (928) 532-2391 or toll free at (888) 459-9653. For sightings or suspected depredations on the FAIR, please call the FAIR wolf office in Whiteriver at (928) 388-4385 ext. 226. To report incidents of take or harassment of wolves, please call the AZGFD 24-hour dispatch (Operation Game Thief) at (800) 352-0700.

Overall Mexican Wolf Recovery Program Monthly Update

In May, USFWS staff attended a Catron County Commissioner’s Meeting in Reserve, NM to discuss the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Mexican Wolf Recovery and Management.  The Commission agreed to submit a request to become a Cooperating Entity under the MOU. An entity requesting Signatory status shall submit its request to the MOU Signatories in the form of a document defining the requesting agency’s proposed responsibilities pursuant to this MOU. Inclusion of additional Signatories shall be approved by majority voice concurrence of current Signatories. On approval, the new Signatory must comply with all aspects of the MOU as it was structured when its request for Signatory status was approved.

Numbering System:  Mexican wolves are given an identification number recorded in an official studbook that tracks their history. Capital letters (M = Male, F = Female) preceding the number indicate adult animals 24 months or older. Lower case letters (m = male, f = female) are used to indicate wolves younger than 24 months. A lower case letter “p” preceding the number is used to indicate a wolf pup born in the most recent spring. The capital letter “A” preceding the letter and number indicate breeding wolves.

Definitions: A “wolf pack” is defined as two or more wolves that maintain an

established territory. In the event that one of the two alpha (dominant) wolves dies, the remaining alpha wolf, regardless of pack size, retains the pack status. The packs referenced in this update contain at least one wolf with a radio telemetry collar attached to it. Studbook numbers listed in the monthly update denote wolves with functioning radio collars. The Interagency Field Team (IFT) recognizes that wolves without radio telemetry collars may also form packs. If the IFT confirms that wolves are associating with each other and are resident within the same home range, they will be referenced as a pack.

CURRENT POPULATION STATUS

The end of year census for 2018 was a minimum of 131 Mexican wolves in the wild (64 in AZ and 67 in NM). This was about a 12% increase in the population from a minimum of 117 wolves counted at the end of 2017.Annual surveys are conducted in the winter as this is when the population experiences the least amount of natural fluctuation (i.e. in the spring the population increases dramatically with the birth of new pups and declines throughout the summer and fall as pup mortality generally occurs in this period). Thus, the IFT summarizes the total number of wolves in the winter at a fairly static or consistent time of year. Counting the population at the end of each year allows for comparable year-to-year trends at a time of year when the Mexican wolf population is most stable.

At the end of May, there were 28 identified wolf packs (14 in AZ and 14 in NM) and four single collared wolves. There were 81 wolves with functioning radio collars that the IFT was actively monitoring. Not all of the wolves are collared. Studbook numbers following individual pack names below denote wolves with functioning radio collars.

IN ARIZONA:

Eagle Creek Pack (collared M1477)

In May, the IFT continued to document M1477 travelling with an uncollared wolf in the pack’s territory in the east central portion of the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest (ASNF).

Elk Horn Pack (collared AF1294, F1668, M1671, m1695, f1696, and f1697)

In May, the Elk Horn Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF in Arizona and New Mexico.

Hoodoo Pack (collared AM1290, AF1333, M1681, F1830, and m1789)

In May, the Hoodoo Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for livestock-related conflict. The Hoodoo Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning in May.

Panther Creek Pack (AM1382 and AF1683)

In May, the IFT documented the Panther Creek Pack in their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster efforts. The Panther Creek Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Pine Spring Pack (collared AM1394, f1794, and f1825)

In May, the Pine Spring Pack was located within their territory in the north central portion of the ASNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for this pack to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

Prime Canyon Pack (collared AM1471, AF1488, m1790, f1791, and f1823)

In May, the IFT documented the Prime Canyon Pack within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF. The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce the potential for conflict. The Prime Canyon Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Rocky Prairie Pack (collared F1489)

In May, the IFT documented F1489 in the east central portion of the ASNF. The Rocky Prairie Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Saffel Pack (collared AM1441, AF1567, f1792 and f1833)

In May, the Saffel Pack was located within their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. This month, one neonatal pup, born in captivity at the Wolf Conservation Center in New York, was cross-fostered by the IFT into the Saffel Pack den. The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. The Saffel Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning after the cross-foster operation.

Sierra Blanca Pack (collared M1571 and F1550)

In May, the Sierra Blanca Pack was located in their territory in the north-eastern portion of the ASNF. The Sierra Blanca Pack exhibited behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Single collared M1574

In May, the IFT documented M1574 travelling in the east central portion of the ASNF and the SCAR. M1574 was documented travelling with F1959 during the month of May.

Single collared F1686

In May, the IFT documented sub adult F1686 in the east central portion of the ASNF and on the FAIR.

Single collared M1829

In May, M1829 was documented making wide dispersal movements in the GNF in New Mexico and in the east central portion of the ASNF.

Single collared F1959

In May, an uncollared female wolf F1959 was caught, collared and released in the east central portion of the ASNF. F1959 was documented travelling with M1574 during the month of May.

ON THE FAIR:

Baldy Pack (collared AM1347 and F1560)

In May, the Baldy Pack was located in their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and north central portion of the ASNF. The Baldy Pack was not documented as denning this season.

Maverick Pack (collared AF1291 and f1828)

In May, the Maverick Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and east central portion of the ASNF.

Tsay-O-Ah Pack (collared M1559 and AF1283)

In May, the Tsay-O-Ah Pack was located within their traditional territory in the eastern portion of the FAIR and occasionally documented north of their territory on the FAIR. The Tsay-O-Ah Pack was documented localizing during the denning season, but no den was found in the area of the localization.

Tu dil hil Pack (collared F1679 and AM1338)

In May, the Tu dil hil Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR.

Poker Pack (collared F1674)

In May, the Poker Pack was documented travelling in the eastern portion of the FAIR and the SCAR.

IN NEW MEXICO:

Dark Canyon Pack (collared AM1354, AF1456, and m1717)

In May, the Dark Canyon Pack was documented travelling together within their traditional territory, in the west central portion of the Gila National Forest (GNF). The Dark Canyon Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Datil Mountain Pack (collared F1685)

In May, the Datil Mountain Pack travelled within their traditional territory in the western portion of the Cibola National Forest (CNF) and the western portion of the ASNF.

Frieborn Pack (collared AF1443, f1701, and f1702)

In May, the Frieborn Pack was documented within their territory in the east central portion of the ASNF in New Mexico and Arizona. The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den. The Frieborn Pack continued to exhibit behaviour and movements consistent with denning in May.

Iron Creek Pack (collared AM1240, AF1278, M1555, F1670, M1821, f1721, m1710, and f1712)

In May, the Iron Creek Pack continued to utilize their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness and the southern portion of the GNF. The Iron Creek Pack exhibited behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Lava Pack (collared AM1285, AF1405, and m1715)

In May, the Lava Pack was located within their traditional territory in the south-eastern portion of the GNF. The Lava Pack continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning in May. The IFT did not locate m1715 during May.

Leon Pack (collared M1824 and F1578)

In May, the Leon Pack was documented within the north-western portion of the Gila National Forest in New Mexico.

Leopold Pack (collared AM1293 and AF1346)

In May, the IFT documented the Leopold Pack within their territory in the northern portion of the Gila Wilderness. The Leopold Pack continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Luna Pack (collared AM1158, AF1487, and m1831)

In May, the Luna Pack remained in their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The Luna Pack continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Mangas Pack (collared AM1296, AF1439, F1705, and M1832)

In May, the Mangas Pack was located within their territory in the north-western portion of the GNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Mangas Pack to reduce potential conflict with livestock. The Mangas Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Prieto Pack (collared AM1398, AF1251, and m1827)

In May, the Prieto Pack was located within their traditional territory in the north central portion of the GNF. The IFT continued to maintain a diversionary food cache for the Prieto Pack to reduce potential for conflict with livestock in May. The Prieto Pack continued to show behaviour consistent with denning in May.

San Mateo Pack (collared AF1399 and f1822)

In May, the San Mateo Pack continued to utilize their territory in the north central portion of the GNF.  This month, two pups, born in captivity at the Sedgwick Zoo in Kansas, were cross-fostered by the IFT into the San Mateo Pack den. The IFT maintained a supplemental food cache near the den as part of the cross-foster effort and to reduce potential for wolf-livestock conflict. The San Mateo Pack continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Sheepherders Baseball Park (SBP) Pack (collared AF1553)

In May, AF1553 was confirmed travelling in the traditional territory of the SBP Pack in the north central portion of the GNF. During May, AF1553 exhibited behaviour consistent with denning.

Squirrel Springs Pack (collared F1788 and M1349)

In May, the Squirrel Springs Pack was located in the north central portion of the GNF. The Squirrel Springs Pack continued to exhibit behaviour consistent with denning in May.

Whitewater Canyon Pack (F1684 and M1827)

In May, the Whitewater Canyon Pack continued to travel in the north central portion of the GNF.

MORTALITIES

There were no documented mortalities during the month of May. From January 1, 2019 to May 31, 2019, there have been a total of six documented wolf mortalities.

INCIDENTS

During the month of May, there were nine confirmed and one probable wolf depredation incidents on livestock. There were two nuisance incidents in May. From January 1, 2019 to May 31, 2019 there have been a total of 79 confirmed and six probable wolf depredation incidents in New Mexico and 19 confirmed wolf depredation incidents in Arizona.

On May 1, Wildlife Services investigated a dead bull in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the bull was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 1, the IFT took a report of three wolves in the town of Alpine, AZ. The IFT responded and removed an old elk carcass from the property. No wolves were present when the IFT arrived at the location of the sighting. Collar data indicated wolves from the Prime Canyon Pack had been in the area of the sighting.

On May 2, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 4, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 6, Wildlife Services investigated a dead cow in Apache County, AZ. The investigation determined the cow was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 8, the IFT took a report of five wolves chasing elk in an open meadow and feeding on an elk carcass in the town of Alpine, AZ. The IFT responded and removed the elk carcass from the property to eliminate further attractant of wolves returning to the area. The wolves had left by the time the IFT arrived. Collar data indicated the wolves observed in town were from the Prime Canyon Pack.

On May 16, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 16, Wildlife Services investigated an injured cow that was later put down in Catron County, NM. The investigation determined the cow was a probable wolf depredation.

On May 22, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

On May 23, Wildlife Services investigated a dead calf in Greenlee County, AZ. The investigation determined the calf was a confirmed wolf depredation.

COMMUNICATION AND COORDINATION

On May 7, AZGFD staff provided a Program update to the Apache County Board of Supervisors in Saint Johns, AZ.

On May 7, WMAT staff gave an update on the KNNB Radio Show in Whiteriver, AZ.

On May 13, USFWS staff and residents of Catron County met with Congressional Representative Xotchil Torres-Small in Las Cruces, NM, to discuss livestock depredations by wolves and compensation.

On May 17, AZGFD staff provided a Program update to the Gila County Cattle Growers in Miami, AZ.

On May 21, USFWS staff met with USFS staff in the USFS R3 Regional Office, Albuquerque, NM.

PROJECT PERSONNEL

In May, Ed Davis rejoined the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program to work for the USFWS as a Mexican Wolf Biologist.  Welcome back Ed.

In May, WMAT welcomed a seasonal Tribal Youth Intern to the Program.

REWARDS OFFERED

The USFWS is offering a reward of up to $10,000; the AZGFD Operation Game Thief is offering a reward of up to $1,000; and the NMDGF is offering a reward of up to $1,000 for information leading to the conviction of the individual(s) responsible for the shooting deaths of Mexican wolves. A variety of non-governmental organizations and private individuals have pledged an additional $46,000 for a total reward amount of up to $58,000, depending on the information provided.

Individuals with information they believe may be helpful are urged to call one of the following agencies: USFWS special agents in Mesa, Arizona, at (480) 967-7900, in Alpine, Arizona, at (928) 339-4232, or in Albuquerque, New Mexico, at (505) 346-7828; the WMAT at (928) 338-1023 or (928) 338-4385; AGFD Operation Game Thief at (800) 352-0700; or NMDGF Operation Game Thief at (800) 432-4263. Killing a Mexican wolf is a violation of the Federal Endangered Species Act and can result in criminal penalties of up to $50,000, and/or not more than one year in jail, and/or a civil penalty of up to $25,000.

From Brigitte Sommer via Change.org (change@e.change.org)

  1. Germany: Germany’s wolves under fire. This is what you can do to prevent it!

We have received so many enquiries regarding LEX-Wolf that we struggle to answer all of them within reasonable time. This degree of interest shows how many people want wolves to stay here in Germany, and that makes us very happy.

Here a list of the most important questions and answers:

Suing LEX-Wolf: we cannot sue because we are not yet three years in existence. That must be left to the big associations, and why they don’t sue or when they are planning to do so you can find out by contacting NABU, GzSdW, Bund, IFAW and the like directly. Of all parties only the Tierschutzpartei has so far announced that they are going to sue.

The fact that we cannot sue does not mean that we don’t do anything. For months, we have been protecting wolves, checking on fences, finding facts, demonstrating at Fridays for Future, doing research and wolf-protection patrols in Saxony, laying charges, putting up rewards for finding wolf poachers, and informing the public about wolves. With our initiative www.menschen-fuer-woelfe.com we counteract misinformation disseminated by the media.

We will design a protest letter to the EU that everybody can make use of, and you can find all information you need about LEX-Wolf with arguments to use in your own letters to the officials here

here

here

and here

Other News

National

Nothing to report

Next Door

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International

Nothing to report

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves are making a comeback. Here’s where to see them

Grab your binoculars and track thriving populations in Yellowstone, Denali, and beyond.

You might say that National Geographic Explorer Doug Smith is obsessed with wolves. After all, he’s spent his entire career studying them. A wildlife biologist, he leads the Wolf Restoration project (https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/nature/wolf-restoration.htm) in Yellowstone National Park, trekking on foot, riding horseback, and leaping from helicopters to research and protect these native canines.

Though several scientists argue the animal’s recovery is not yet complete  (see here) , gray wolves are no longer considered endangered in some states, and a 40-year conservation effort has seen their numbers boom—meaning there’s no better time to encounter them in their native habitats.

“The wolf is the poster child of wilderness,” says Smith. “When you see one in the wild, it awakens the senses and everything feels right.” Here are a few of his favorite places to spot them in the United States.

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks

If you explore these majestic landscapes for three or four days, “you’ll be rewarded with more than just a glimpse,” Smith says. For the best wolf sightings, visit in summer or midwinter and search during the early morning. In Yellowstone, look for packs living in the Lamar Valley, Hayden Valley, and Blacktail Deer Plateau. In Grand Teton, head to Willow Flats. (Learn how the Yellowstone we don’t see is a struggle for life and death: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2016/05/yellowstone-national-parks-part-2/)

Trip tips: Drive the Great Loop Road to pass through Lamar Valley for a chance to glimpse its local wolf pack, then head southwest to the Mount Washburn Trail, a six-mile loop to a fire lookout tower that provides a sweeping, 10,000-foot vantage point over Yellowstone. Book well in advance at Old Faithful Inn (May-October) to experience the national historic landmark for yourself. At Grand Teton, be on the lookout for other wildlife from beavers to bison, then make your way to Jackson Lake to fish, sail, water ski, and windsurf.

Denali National Park & Preserve

In this remote Alaskan wilderness—at 6.1 million acres, one of the largest national parks in the U.S.—expect fewer people and more wolves. Drivers on the Denali Park Road frequently report sightings. If you spot wolves, don’t give chase. “They’ll run away,” Smith says, “and it ruins the moment for everyone.” If you’re on foot, scout river banks for clues such as paw prints. Bring binoculars or a spotting scope to zoom in on the action. (Here’s how to do wildlife tourism right: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/lists/activities/how-to-do-wildlife-tourism-right/)

Trip tips: Visit in summer, when Denali Park Road is open. You can drive the first 15 miles, then hop on a shuttle or tour bus. After a day of hiking, stay the night at Wonder Lake Campground for commanding views of Denali itself, at 20,310 feet North America’s tallest peak. Pack insect repellent to ward off the persistent mosquitoes and be sure to make use of the bear-safe food lockers available in the campground.

Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness

Bundle up if you go in winter, the prime time to see wolves in this pristine part of Minnesota. Try a sled dog excursion and follow wolf tracks in the snow. During late summer, book a guided canoe trip and you may be treated to the rare sound of wolf pups learning to howl. The presence of wolves, Smith says, gives the area that “wild, north woods feeling.”

Trip tips: As its name suggests, the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness is best seen from the water. Reserve the required permits to enter and overnight, then strike off on your own or book a guided canoe tour. Motorboats are mostly banned in this massive, glacier-carved backcountry. In the winter, trade the boat for a dogsled, a pair of skis, or snowshoes to traverse the serene expanse.

Original article by Kitson Jazynka at

Wolves and Wolfdogs

Wolves Feel Sadness And Grieve Like Humans

by White Wolf Pack

We have much in common with wolves. Wolves have emotional lives, can experience emotions such as joy and grief.

Wolves mourn lost pack members. After the death of a wolf, the remainder of the pack walk with their heads and tails held low – a sign of depression. They no longer howl as a group, but each cries in their own way. This behavior often lasts for a few weeks.
Jim and Jamie Dutcher describe the grief and mourning in a wolf pack after the loss of the low-ranking omega female wolf, Motaki, to a mountain lion. The pack lost their spirit and their playfulness. They no longer howled as a group, but rather they “sang alone in a slow mournful cry.
” They were depressed — tails and heads held low and walking softly and slowly — when they came upon the place where Motaki was killed. They inspected the area and pinned their ears back and dropped their tails, a gesture that usually means submission.

It took about six weeks for the pack to return to normal. The Dutchers also tell of a wolf pack in Canada in which one pack died and the others wandered about in a figure eight as if searching for her. They also howled long and mournfully.

Original article by White Wolf Pack at

Wolf Myths and Legends, Part 162

The Truth

by Vanya Bosiocic

There was a time long ago when I fought the greatest wolf one has ever seen. He was white, with amber eyes that pierced my soul and a strong body that blazed with power and dominance. I trespassed on his territory and angered him, he growled, warning me that were I stood was his land, and there I had no right to be.

“But I am a warrior” so I said to the wolf, “this forest is all mine and I shall walk where I please, for I am a man and you are only a beast,” so the wolf growled at me again and bared his fangs at me, warning me for the last time that this was his territory. So I showed him that I was a man and a warrior, I fought him, bare-handed, without my knife or sword. It was a good fight, full of courage and heart, and the victor was excellent and noble. So noble was he that, at the end, when he had my throat between his teeth and could have killed me with one effortless move, he let me go and walked away. I stared back at him in shock, unable to comprehend why the monster had speared my life, “why did you do that, wolf, for I am your enemy, if you were a man I would have been dead instantly.”

He stopped and looked back at me one more time, his wise amber eyes pierced my heart more deeply than any sward and arrow I ever took to my flesh, “I give you back your life, my enemy” he said to me, “because you are only a man, and I am a beast” and in that instant, as I watched him retreat into his darkening kingdom, I realized who the monster really was.

Readers’ Contribution

A Wolfdog Diary

by Erin

Boy, can it be cold here on the Highveld – for two weeks, night temperatures dropped to below 0, the mornings were freezing cold, and the days weren’t much better, at least not when this strong cold wind was blowing. But what really amazed me (and also puzzles me) is that Taima had nothing better to do in this cold but to start shedding her thick undercoat. Last year she started on and off because the weather was rather unpredictable, with some nights being unusually mild and others freezing cold, but the days were quite nice. This year she started in the middle of winter (so to speak) and it looks as though she may be finished within a week or so. The fluffy undercoat is sticking out of her in big bunches and Ted “plucks” it out every morning, harvesting handfuls of wool at a time (for spinning wool), like spring would be just around the corner. Kajack has also started and even Ascar is losing hair left, right and centre. So, you can imagine what our house looks like in the moment. Once more, wolf hair has become the most commonly digested kind of fibre here.

In the moment the weather is rather mild (which Ted and I welcome very much), but who knows how long that will last. On the other hand we are already in the middle of July, and it would not be the first time that spring indeed starts as early as August. Well, for Ted’s and my sake I hope for the best; we are just not made for winter and nothing can “paralyze” us as cold temperatures can. I think winters should take place only in areas where not only the four-legged but also the two-legged inhabitants can go into hibernation, hehe.

Will be continued…